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Topic: What PS3 game(s) are you currently playing?

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KratosMD

@kyleforrester87 I think I've already been spoiled about what happens at the end (it's a seven-year-old game after all, kinda hard to avoid spoilers this long) but I haven't seen it so I'm looking forward to it!

@Splat Yeah, RDR is for me one of the best games Rockstar has produced. That and GTA V, which also has amazing story and online experiences.

Edited on by KratosMD

Best games as voted by the PushSquare community:
PS1: Metal Gear Solid, Final Fantasy VII, Castlevania: Symphony of the Night, Final Fantasy IX, Tomb Raider II

Th3solution

@KratosMD Yeah, RDRedemption is one of greatest, especially the end. Hmmm sounds like a topic for a thread if there's not one already. 🤔 I'm curious what people think are some of their favorite game endings.
Anyway, enjoy Red Dead! Can't wait for the sequel.

The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

Th3solution

@KratosMD And there's actually more than one aspect of the ending that is awesome. There's an ending, then another ending — like an epilogue sort of, which I loved. So maybe you haven't had everything spoiled

The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

KratosMD

@Th3solution Well I already know that the protagonist will die which I'm guessing is the major thing about the ending. I don't know more than that, so hopefully there will be more to the ending.

Best games as voted by the PushSquare community:
PS1: Metal Gear Solid, Final Fantasy VII, Castlevania: Symphony of the Night, Final Fantasy IX, Tomb Raider II

RogerRoger

I'm really struggling with Red Dead Redemption.

Probably 50% the game, 50% me. As with most open-world sandbox games, there's simply too much information dumped on you in the first hour. I missed half a dozen pop-up notifications in the top-left corner, with the tiny text that barely hangs around, so much so that some major mechanics of the game still elude me. I have no idea how to actually do a stand-off. I just take aim with L1 and spam Dead Eye in the hopes that I'm quicker than my opponent; the two that I've had to do as part of story missions took three or four attempts, and the one I did randomly in the street resulted in my death and re-spawning at the nearest room I'd purchased.

Speaking of which, I also missed the notification about Camping (in fact, I missed that I had a Satchel at all for a long while) and spent forever riding back to the nearest town to advance time and save my progress between missions, most of which invariably ended in the middle of nowhere. Coupled with the ever-frustrating "come back between 5am and 12pm tomorrow" restrictions on some missions (I don't care if it's late; I can see your light on, I know you're home!) and I'm sure I've wasted far, far more time than I should have. When a friend told me about Camping, I could've screamed.

Despite those self-imposed delays, I really feel like the single player storyline is dragging on, unnecessarily so. I'm all for longer games, but a lot of the missions in Red Dead feel like padding. I've lost track of the amount of times I'd start one with the promise of advancing the plot, only to complete a few objectives and have somebody say "Great, thanks for that... so listen, y'know I said I'd help you find those people you're looking for? Come back tomorrow and do me another favour, and we'll see about whether I'll consider thinking about trying to start to wonder about finding out some vague clues for you, okay cheers, bye!" None of it seems to have any bearing on John Marsden's storyline; they're all just obstacles to overcome in the hunt for your former friends, to the point where I feel slightly detatched from the core plot by the time more of it swings around.

It's quite telling that the game only rewards you with story-related trophies once in a blue moon. I've cleared a good two-thirds of the game (I've just finished off the Mexico storyline and am heading to Blackwater) and yet I've only got four bronze trophies, two suddenly back-to-back, and for a good twenty-odd missions in the middle there, I got nothing. That stings a little more when I look at the extensive trophy list and realise I'm never gonna get the majority of them, because they're mostly rewards for multiplayer or Undead Nightmare, modes I have no interest in.

Also, I really hate saying this one because it makes me sound crazy, but the world is too alive. That might be a result of the game's age. Back when open-world sandbox games were all the rage, developers loved to pack in little touches that made everything feel more real, and Red Dead has some great ones, but they're too frequent and can cause real headaches to those just trying to make their way in the Wild West (yes, I know, it's realistic... but, at the risk of sounding like one of those horrible customers from Westworld, I'm trying to play a game in my downtime, I'm trying to relax and ride some horses and play some poker, not stress over whether I'm gonna get robbed on my way back to the ranch). More modern games of the genre, like Horizon: Zero Dawn, have found the perfect balance. I feel that Red Dead 2 really needs to tone down some of the hazards, or at least the penalties for failure in smaller tasks.

I also had to drastically lower the camera sensitivity for some bizarre reason, to avoid doing a complete one-eighty whenever I happened to cough near the right analogue stick (I've had man-flu recently... maybe that's why I'm so grumpy about this game?).

There are, however, things I do like. I like John Marsden. I was expecting Rockstar to serve up another unsympathetic drug-dealing, drunken pervert protagonist, and when he started talking about "doing bad things in my past" I got a little concerned, but he has a moral compass and is trying to do right by his nefarious history, his wife and his child, which I appreciate. I love the little touches, like when he visits a house of ill repute and the members of the oldest profession call to him, and he replies with "Sorry, ma'am, I'm married." Being able to play him as a good man, avoiding killing innocent people and animals, is something I wasn't expecting. It's nice, especially when most of the other characters you encounter are just downright awful people (with a few notable exceptions; Bonnie and her father are great, and the old gunslinger who you find upon arriving in Mexico, who just spends his days helping people out, was awesome).

I'm gonna finish the story and then gather as many of the additional trophies as I can, such as Bandit Camps and Strangers, before putting it to bed. I'm still looking forward to the sequel, but I think I'll wait to see a few reviews and snippets of gameplay before taking the plunge. Here's hoping all the tweaks and changes they've made aren't just graphical.

Edited on by RogerRoger

"It is possible to commit no mistakes and still lose. That is not a weakness; that is life."
Cpt. Jean-Luc Picard, Stardate: 42923.4

Th3solution

@RogerRoger Argh.. it pains me to read your critique of one of my fondest PS3 memories. You monster. What do you know of true greatness... humph 😤
😉 But seriously, I actually quite enjoyed reading your experience. I did love RDR but it has been so long since I played it that there may be some rose-tinted glasses reminiscence going on. I poured a boat-load of time into it, but don’t remember ever feeling like it was stale or that the narrative was sluggish, as you have so humorously relayed.
It seems like there is a auto-aim setting I used which made the game actually quite easy, iirc. I know you’re not likely to have co-op or MP available with the game this old (pretty sure the servers are long gone), but I have some of my greatest online memories from doing co-op missions and playing games with an online friend back then, and I don’t even like online gaming.
That said, I completely understand the frustrations you describe. I went out of my way to trophy hunt and played quite a long while on the game and still only achieved 60% of the trophy list. The platinum has a 0.4% achievement rate, so it’s pretty scarce.
And I know you’ve heard this many times before, but the payoff is really worth it in the end. The story is not necessarily my favorite video game story as a whole, but the ending is definitely one of my favorites. Along with — Bioshock Infinite, The Last of Us, and Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons, RDR was the cream of the PS3 crop as far as endings go, imho.
Hang in there and keep us updated how your impressions change (or don’t change) as you reach the end.

The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

RogerRoger

@Th3solution Well, after my rant yesterday, I had a clear evening and so pushed ahead... and ended up finishing the story in a four-hour chunk of gameplay (I never usually play for so long at once any more, which gives you a clue as to how much I enjoyed the finale).

I guessed John would die two missions before he actually did, because I chatted to Death, or at least the Stranger who was so blatantly Death. Having recently played L.A. Noire and seen the ending to that storyline, I put two and two together. What was a surprise, however, was to return as Jack Marsden three years later, to take revenge and continue the unfinished side quests... that was a stroke of genius, and a wonderful extra touch that most developers wouldn't even think to do (rather than record brand new incidental dialogue for a new character, and change all the side quest character exchanges, etc. almost all open-world sandboxes just boot you back to the point before the finale, which is what I was expecting to happen). To that end, I hopped back on for a couple hours this morning, just to see how different Jack was, and kinda enjoyed wrapping up the Bandit Camps and Stranger quests I had yet to complete with a totally new character. I really like Jack, perhaps moreso than John, and now I'm hoping the rumours about Red Dead 2 being a prequel aren't true; I'd like to see a sequel with Jack continuing his father's legacy.

Whilst I'm in these spoiler tags, however, I feel like I should give the storyline some knocks. Having now seen it all conclude, I feel that a lot of the hype and praise lavished on the game is because of the last hour of a twenty-something-hour storyline. The core plot is "John Marsden must hunt down his old gang for the government, who are holding his family hostage. John achieves this, and has a moment of peace, before the government then turns on him. Years later, John's son returns to have his revenge." Can anybody please tell me what anything that happened in Mexico had to do with that?! I know storylines in big games like this need to be diverse, and the characters were all certainly unique and interesting, but I felt that the Mexico diversion was simply because Rockstar wanted to pad things out and have a couple more places on the map. Gameplay impacted narrative; I know that's the eternal struggle of story-driven games, but this was a really glaring example of one beating out the other.

I felt a little guilty about my previous criticism of the slow mid-section of the story, because I hadn't seen the end and hadn't therefore seen how it all came together, but the truth is that helping revolutionaries south of the border had nothing to do with anything, except stringing John along for a good two-dozen missions. I'd have felt more emotional at the finale, everything would've had more impact, if it hung together better. As such, during those famous, epic last hours on John's ranch, I was either fed up of following my dog back into the tall trees for the eleventh time, or just left going "hey, that was cool, I guess" and wondering what my final trophy percentage would be. Oh, and stop telling me that my family member isn't around at the moment when they're standing right there!

A friend of mine was texting me last night, and she played it at release and said it was "amazing" but that she hadn't ever replayed it since, which I found quite telling. She asked me "Did you love the bit where you're riding your horse back from that mission and that song plays?" and that question just reinforced how I feel, namely that a lot of the praise Red Dead receives is for small moments of genuis in an otherwise-sprawling wasteland of mediocrity. That bit she was referring to was ninety seconds, tops. Last night, I played the very best four hours of the game and (mostly) loved them, but I came away feeling like the twenty previous hours it took to get there were a chore. Whilst I'd never be arrogant enough to tell another person what they think, your comment about not having played it for a while and therefore admitting the possibility of nostalgia goggles influencing your opinion might be right on the money.

And hey, there's nothing wrong with that, not in the slightest. My favourite Star Wars film is The Phantom Menace; not because I think it's a cinematic masterpiece, but because I was eleven when it came out. I was the target audience, the marketing worked like a dream and everything about it was my life for two years, and that's tough to get over, no matter how many qualifications in media and film I've subsequently achieved. Because of that, I really wish that I'd played Red Dead at launch, because I'm almost certain I'd have thought it was wonderful (story pacing issues aside). I can tell that, at the time, it was the pinnacle of open-world sandbox gaming.

Part of me does wish the multiplayer servers were more active, so that I could at least give some of the co-operative modes a try, because I'd imagine they could be quite fun with the right group of friends (similar to you, I'm generally not one for multiplayer either, and I doubt I could even cobble together a friend to play with, let alone the two or three required for a posse). I guess I'm focused on the narrative of the single player because it's all that remains of what is obviously quite a complex, multi-layered experience. There's a trade-off between gameplay mechanics and telling a cinematic story, and I have to say that Rockstar always take on some of the very best cinematic genres (western, film noir) and then deliver on the atmosphere, but never the substance. I felt the same after L.A. Noire and it's a shame (although I should acknowledge that writing thirty-odd hours of content for an interactive experience is way tougher than writing a two-hour, sit-down-shut-up-and-just-watch film, so perhaps I shouldn't criticise too loudly).

Early last year, I replayed the PS2 western GUN. That's an even older game, but I felt it captured the sweeping, romantic nature of the Wild West much better than Red Dead did. That's probably down to the music. For the record (pun semi-intended), I don't like vocals in music, so that aforementioned example I gave before left me cold and, overall, I was underwhelmed by the subdued, minimalist music in Red Dead. On the other hand, I've got a copy of, and listen regularly to, GUN's big, bold orchestral soundtrack, which sounds like it was ripped straight from the most clichéd of Hollywood films. It's just another illustration of what I mentioned in my previous post; I can only speak for myself, but I love my games to be escapist fantasy, with everything dialled up to eleven. GUN was that. Red Dead was not. Perhaps the latter is a more remarkable achievement, and huge credit to the accomplishment of the developers, but the former is where I'll always hang my hat.

In other words, as I opened with yesterday, my problems with Red Dead are 50% the game's fault and 50% my own. The ending did a lot of heavy lifting to elevate the rest of the experience, but it made the whole thing worthwhile. I'm glad I played it, glad I enjoyed the moments that I did, and glad that I've ticked another important piece of gaming history off my to-do list.

Final note: those other games you mentioned with great endings? Never played any of those, either. I can't go anywhere near The Last of Us (which still pains me to this day; I adore Naughty Dog, but I can't do horror / zombies... the Creepers and Husks in Mass Effect and the Descendants in Uncharted: Drake's Fortune were bad enough, and we all know how tame they are). Somebody told me the ending to the first Bioshock and, as such, I've never felt the need to play the franchise. Funny how a tiny sentence, a spoiler or a tease, can do that!

Edited on by RogerRoger

"It is possible to commit no mistakes and still lose. That is not a weakness; that is life."
Cpt. Jean-Luc Picard, Stardate: 42923.4

Th3solution

@RogerRoger Great mini review there and I can agree with you wholeheartedly. The epilogue or second ending with the son taking revenge was the icing on the cake. And I can agree with you the journey getting to those final epic moments was a bit arduous.
I won’t rehash anything more than to say I think your thoughts are valid. As a further example, I did try to play Undead Nightmare, which as far as DLC goes was very well done, but after a few hours into it, I didn’t feel inclined to stay with it after having experienced the original game’s completion, and I certainly haven’t played the full game again, nor do I desire to. Now to be fair, my personal preference is not to replay games and I don’t do it very often, even NG+ modes. Shadow of the Colossus I’m replaying on PS4 now is one of the first in a long time that I am enjoying experiencing a replay of.

I expect RDR2 to definitely be heavy on the online component and I just hope the emphasis there does not detract from the single player campaign. If R* can evolve a little and make the story a solid and meaningful narrative throughout as you outlined, then we will surely have a potentially transcendent game on our hands.

As far as the other PS3 games I listed, you’ll have less of an issue with padding in the story on those. Those 3 story endings just came to mind as ones that stuck with me from the last gen.
Brothers is only a 4 hr game so there is little room for padding. It’s pretty fun too. The gameplay is unique.
Bioshock: Infinite, although related to Bioshock, can be enjoyed as a story that is pretty much separate and all it’s own, so even knowing the ending of the first game you can still get a solid experience from B:I and one with a very impactful conclusion all it’s own, and is about a 15 hr commitment. But a word of caution — In retrospect, B:I’s story may not be quite as interesting to someone from outside the U.S. because it is occurs in a fictional and strange early 1900s America that has cultural references and subtle nods to our history that may be more meaningful to us ‘mericans, I don’t know.
As for The Last of Us, .... well, what can I say more than what had been said a million times about that game. And at this point, it’s probably a minor miracle if you haven’t had the story spoiled for you. I will say that I am also far from a horror fan. I don’t like scary games in general. I have liked The Walking Dead and I surprisingly liked Until Dawn, but beyond those, I don’t play all these zombie and horror games. The game has its share of gruesome infected enemies and some jump scares and very creepy heart pounding encounters, but it never seems gratuitous. The horror or zombie type moments are only a part of the overall narrative. The story (about 20 hr commitment) is more about the characters, their relationships and development. The post apocalyptic setting is very fleshed out but for me, that’s not what I enjoyed the most, rather it was the story and the epic conclusion. Of course, since this is the PS3 thread, I would say the remastered PS4 version would be probably a better experience. I don’t know, since I played it on PS3 and like I said, I don’t replay games typically.

The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

kyleforrester87

I watched my friend play this (having cleared it myself) and he was right at the end about to take his revenge, literally had his hand on his six iron about to draw and a random cougar jumped out from the edge of the screen, grabbed him by his shooting arm and dragged him to the floor, killing him, game over. All in slow motion too. It was glorious.

Then we reloaded and shot him deeeeeead.

Edited on by kyleforrester87

kyleforrester87

PSN: WigSplitter1987

Rudy_Manchego

@RogerRoger While I loved Read Dead Redemption, I haven't played it since finishing it soon after launch and I know I played it to death but that was a good few years ago now (to put it in perpsective, I can remember turning it off to watch the first ever episode of The Walking Dead). However, in a lot of ways, I too preferred Gun on the PS2. It was really cinematic for the time, the gun play was fun and the open world as smaller and more focused. Also, the voice acting was great and you are spot on with the music.

I'd love a remake or a sequel to that game.

Now I may be an idiot, but there's one thing I am not sir, and that sir, is an idiot

https://jambags.co.uk

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RogerRoger

Thanks to all for not lynching me; I often find my opinions going against the grain and, as I played Red Dead, I felt as though it'd be yet another example of me being out-of-step with the majority. Having a couple of folk come here and say that, despite loving it, they can completely understand where I'm coming from... well, that doesn't happen very often, and I'm very grateful.

The universally-great moments, like the ending, are what give me hope for the sequel. With any luck, Rockstar have given proper focus to the single player and crafted a story that's more focused on those epic, emotional bits of gaming legend. Concerns about an online component detracting from the single player are valid (the state of gaming in 2018 should make that a concern of any game with online multiplayer) but it's pretty clear, reading the replies here and other retrospective reviews, that most of what makes the original Red Dead so fondly remembered is the single player storyline. Enough opposition has built up towards microtransactions in the past year, and Red Dead isn't as ubiquitous as GTA, that Rockstar would be fools to produce something light on story and heavy on multiplayer, no matter how good either component actually is.

@Rudy_Manchego Glad I'm not the only one with fond memories of GUN. I think I was definitely expecting something more akin to that, going into Red Dead, because I could totally understand how people would fall in love with it. I often thought of it, or hummed some of the music to myself, whilst I was riding back and forth between missions in Mexico.

@Th3solution Thank you for the additional detail on those other games. Despite being a Brit, your caution over the American cultural and historical references in Bioshock: Infinite actually makes me more interested to play it, as I've always had a strong connection and fascination with American cultural and social history (perhaps moreso than my own country's). Knowing that it has nothing to do with the first game's twist ending, I will keep it in mind and look into it, once I've made a dent in the rest of my current backlog. As for your thoughts on The Last of Us, all I will say is that miracles do happen, as I have no idea what the story is even about, let alone any of the details about how it ends. When I say that I avoid zombies like the plague (pun semi-intended), I mean it, but if I ever find myself re-considering that position, I'll come here and share my experience with you guys once again.

"It is possible to commit no mistakes and still lose. That is not a weakness; that is life."
Cpt. Jean-Luc Picard, Stardate: 42923.4

KratosMD

Speaking of Red Dead Redemption, I just started playing Undead Nightmare now and I'm really loving it. All the characters are so nonchalant about the zombie outbreak just because they wouldn't know what zombies were back then or that infections are what is causing them to act like they do, which is really interesting to observe. And it's pretty fun going from place to place clearing hordes of enemies and you really don't get a lot of ammo in this DLC which makes it more intense. The story is not really that in depth but it is what it is.

Also playing Rayman Legends on the 360 (since it's on PS3 as well I might as well mention it here) and I'm at the second to last world. The levels have been so much fun and I really love this game. It's definitely one of my favourite platformers of all time.

Edited on by KratosMD

Best games as voted by the PushSquare community:
PS1: Metal Gear Solid, Final Fantasy VII, Castlevania: Symphony of the Night, Final Fantasy IX, Tomb Raider II

RogerRoger

@KratosMD Thank you for confirming what I'd feared. Part of me was slightly tempted to try Undead Nightmare (heck, it was on the disc, I paid money for it... felt bad that I was ignoring it) but now, having read your description, hordes + limited ammo = stress I don't need!

My personal terror of the digital undead aside, I'm glad to hear that the concept of a zombie outbreak has been well-integrated into the Wild West setting and that it wasn't just a tacked-on cash-in on the popularity of the zombie genre at the time; hope you continue to enjoy.

"It is possible to commit no mistakes and still lose. That is not a weakness; that is life."
Cpt. Jean-Luc Picard, Stardate: 42923.4

KratosMD

@RogerRoger Thanks! I've played it more now and from what I've gathered, even though ammo felt limited in the beginning, the more towns you clear hordes in the more ammo you'll get so it's rather easy to grind for it. The new issue is then that the game can get quite repetitious by clearing hordes, get new weapons and then you rinse and repeat. Even the story missions are like that where they first involve returning characters speaking for a while and then you're off to do new side quests that have unlocked where you clear even more hordes.

I mean I don't really mind this type of gameplay since I like grinding in general and it's been a while since I played this game and I've been in a mood to play it. But for a person like you who has just played the main game, I think you will find the DLC rather distasteful unless you also like grinding.

Best games as voted by the PushSquare community:
PS1: Metal Gear Solid, Final Fantasy VII, Castlevania: Symphony of the Night, Final Fantasy IX, Tomb Raider II

Th3solution

@KratosMD Yeah, I tried to play Undead Nightmare right after the main game, and burned out on it pretty quick. I never finished it, but I bet I would like it if I went back to it now. All I remember was the zombified animals were a nice touch. The zombie bear was awesome as I recall.

The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

Gamer83

I've gone back and played some Killzone 2. It's been a while and it took a bit of getting used to again, but, it's still one of my top 3 favorite FPS of all-time.

Gamer83

KratosMD

@Th3solution I thought the zombie horse was cool but then I realised that you are supposed to use this horse throughout the entire DLC and it keeps veering off to the side at random. Then it became very annoying. The zombie bear was indeed awesome. You should've seen my reaction when I saw a half-eaten undead bear running towards me. Nearly crapped my pants, lol.

Best games as voted by the PushSquare community:
PS1: Metal Gear Solid, Final Fantasy VII, Castlevania: Symphony of the Night, Final Fantasy IX, Tomb Raider II

KratosMD

@RogerRoger @Th3solution I've played the DLC a bit more now and I have to say that it does keep getting better and better. The story missions actually become more involved when you see familiar characters and see some of them turn into zombies that you have to kill. Moreover, there are some really cool things in the DLC, like a flaming horse. It doesn't run out of stamina and it can put zombies on fire when you run into them (on top of looking absolutely gallantly)! You also get to unlock an explosive rifle (basically a grenade launcher) and the explosions look so over-the-top. It basically pulverises anything you use it on, it's great. I don't think this weapon was available in the single player portion of the main game, so that's really neat.

I also think the DLC has been much funnier than the main game overall. The characters keep mentioning controversial things being the reasons for the zombie outbreak (race, religion, nationality) and it makes the dialogues so much fun to listen to just because how topical that stuff is today. And then obviously the people who talk like this get eaten up by the zombies as bad karma, lol. Great stuff.

Best games as voted by the PushSquare community:
PS1: Metal Gear Solid, Final Fantasy VII, Castlevania: Symphony of the Night, Final Fantasy IX, Tomb Raider II

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