It's probably a little bit counterproductive of me, a writer for a video game website, to be getting tired of the hints towards what we should expect at the next videogame extravaganza, but here we are. The Game Awards are taking place tomorrow night, and host Geoff Keighley has been teasing announcements and special guests for the past few days now, but his latest reveal goes a little too far in my opinion. We now know that a new Far Cry game will be shown tomorrow night, and while I wasn't a big fan of the series' fifth iteration, that's still a big announcement. I ask: Why couldn't all of that be saved for the actual event taking place within the next 35 hours?

Many, many people use the rebuttal that you're simply buying into a publisher's hype machine by tuning into these sorts of shows and fuelling the likes of pre-orders, but I simply cannot help it. I get very excited for any sort of event that will play host to new game announcements, I book an entire week off work for E3, and I keep track of every piece of news and industry happening. It's obvious that I share this passion with every one of you too, but for me personally, when I see Mr. Keighley taking to Twitter to tell me that I should expect more footage of RAGE 2, I just sort of sigh.

The wind is taken out of the reveal's sails, tomorrow night I'll be sat there waiting for Bethesda's trailer to pass me by so that we can actually get on to the things we don't know about. Whereas if no such tease existed, two more minutes of footage with a release date at the end is far more likely to have me excited. Of course it hasn't been explicitly stated that they're there to pull the curtain off of Square Enix's Avengers title, but imagine if the Russo Brothers turned up out of the blue, instead of letting the cat of the bag a few days ago. There's a good possibility that the likes of Iron Man, Thor, and Captain America will be taking to The Game Awards' stage, but it has gotten to the point where we sort of already expect it. But then if it doesn't happen, there's the sense of disappointment that stems from something we didn't even know for sure would happen in the first place. That's a whole other topic though.

I completely understand why the likes of Geoff Keighley do this sort of thing, they need to pull in audiences from every demographic of gaming to ensure a high viewer count throughout the ceremony. They need the Fortnite reveal so that Ninja brings with him his viewership, the Russo Brothers so that Marvel fans tune in, and Phil Spencer from Xbox in anticipation of another studio acquitision, but for someone who was going to watch anyway, it just doesn't speak to me in any sort of positive manner.

Of course there will still be those big surprises that nobody saw coming tomorrow night, and I'll revel in them, but to think there could be so many more. I'm fine with celebrity presenter reveals and musical performance teaser prior to the event, but let's save what really matters, the games, for the night itself. The new Far Cry title could have been one of those big announcements we're talking about days later, but now it's just another footnote in an upcoming event we already seem to know much of the landscape of. It's about striking the right balance between making sure certain demographics of people tune in and having surprises on the night, and I don't think The Game Awards has gone about it correctly this time around.


Do you agree with Liam that the amount of teases towards what's coming next is getting a little bit too much? Or do you enjoy them? Predict an announcement in the comments below.