PlayStation Meetings are rarer than Atlas Stones, so it's always exciting when Sony announces one of the exclusive events. The last shindig that the platform holder held saw the announcement of the PlayStation 4, while the next will almost certainly play host to the PS4K – or Neo, as it's also known. And with the 7th September show just weeks away, we figured that we'd dream up five reveals that the Japanese giant must make in relation to its super-powered system.

All in a name

Step one: we need a friggin' name. Neo is what the console's been codenamed internally, but The Matrix obsession is getting a little cringe now, isn't it? Many people have already awarded the console the moniker PS4K based on leaked speculation pointing to Ultra HD functionality – it's a nice bit of wordplay, after all. But will Sony select it when the device will likely have much more to offer than 4K support? PS4 Plus seems like a bad choice given the existence of PlayStation Plus as a service, while PS4.5 sounds somewhat negative in nature. We need a name, then.

The price is right

Look, it's not hard to be excited by the prospect of new PlayStation hardware, but until we know how much it's going to cost, no one's going to be doing somersaults. Our guess is that Sony will drop the price of the current PS4 model on 7th September, allowing the upgraded console to assume the $399.99 price point. This figure was extremely kind to the platform holder in 2013, so why change a winning strategy, eh? If what PlayStation president Andrew House has been saying about an Apple-esque rollout is true, then it'll need to name its price, because we reckon pre-orders will go live almost immediately.

What's next for the PS4?

While there'll be plenty of people happy to upgrade their current PS4, there'll be an equal number of people concerned about what the introduction of a supercharged model means for their existing console. Sony will need to address this, then – outlining exactly what differences consumers can expect, and reassuring that all software, apps, and peripherals will continue to be compatible with the existing unit. It has a difficult tightrope to tread here: it needs to make the new console look attractive without upsetting those who don't want to upgrade.

Flex those specs

People can argue with us until they're blue in the face, but we maintain that Microsoft announced the Scorpio over a year before launch because it wanted to throw a spanner in the Neo's works. The strategy's simple: promise the world and hope that it's enough to get people to wait. Sony's used the same tactic itself many times over the years. On this occasion it's getting a taste of its own medicine, so it'll be interesting to see how it opts to explain the PS4K's specs. The leaked documentation suggests that we can expect about 4.2 teraflops of power, which is significantly more than the current PS4, but also less than what Scorpio's promising. The Japanese giant will need to lay everything on the line.

What does it do?

This is probably the most important point really: we need to know what the PS4K can actually do. How is it going to make games look better? Which titles are going to support it at launch? Will it have an Ultra HD Blu-ray player? Are there any other features that we don't know about – like improved download speeds or perhaps a revised DualShock 4 controller? There are so many questions that Sony needs to answer, and we reckon a lot is going to depend on how it tackles them as to how this product is received. Our guess is that you'll probably see demos of Horizon: Zero Dawn and Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare to showcase the machine, but don't rule out a patch for Uncharted 4: A Thief's End either.


What do you think that Sony needs to announce at next month's PlayStation Meeting? Are you excited for the event, or a little bit concerned? Upgrade your specs in the comments section below.

[via bit.ly]