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Topic: User Impressions/Reviews Thread

Posts 921 to 938 of 938

Arugula

@RogerRoger No risk in adding Erica to your library! I add everything free regardless of interest level on the off chance that I may develop an inkling at some point.

Arugula

JohnnyShoulder

@Arugula I only add games that I've an interest in. I've got too many games that I've not started to be adding stuff that i have zero interest in.

We are now in a world of people being offended for other people who they think should be offended, who arent offended.

There is no longer a good time to release a game. There are only less s**t times to release a game

PSN: JohnnyShoulder

Ralizah

I add everything. There's literally no reason not to.

Who knows? I could get brain damage one day and wake up wanting to play a sports game, and then I'll be glad I have NBA 2Kwhatever on my account.

Current Games:

Astral Chain (Switch)

DOOM 3: BFG Edition (PC)

Paper Mario: The Origami King (Switch)

PSN: Ralizah

RogerRoger

@Ralizah No, the horror elements of Erica weren't what stopped me (although you're one of the few sources to prominently mention them). I just felt that, if I wanted to watch a half-decent movie, I wouldn't wanna be periodically interrupted by the need to push buttons. Despite my attempts at tolerance towards all media, I recognise that I can be quite curmudgeonly when it comes to things picking a lane. Be a movie, or be a game. Don't try to be both, and end up failing at being either.

Remasters and re-releases are fast becoming more viable during the current pandemic, as they're easier to accomplish remotely and less labour-intensive for developers, so maybe that Mega Man Legends compilation is closer than you think. I'll keep fingers crossed for you!

***

@Arugula I wish I could do that, but my OCD demands I keep a tidy Library. There have been a couple occasions where I've gone to purchase things that were once offered via PS Plus, and I've mentally kicked myself for doing so. I'm trying to be a bit more assertive, though. There are a couple titles in my Library which I may never play, but are semi-likely to get a look-in once I've cleared more of my backlog.

PSN ID: GDS_2421
Making It So Since 1987

RR529

Shantae & the Seven Sirens (Switch), the latest entry in the cult series.
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Ret-To-Go!

Gameplay

  • It's a pretty standard side scrolling "Metroidvania" action/platformer, though it has a touch of classic Zelda as well (you obtain most of your required upgrades while exploring themed dungeons where you ultimately use your new ability to reach & defeat it's boss).
  • In addition to the ability upgrades you get by working through the game's dungeons, you can upgrade your health by collecting Heart Squids scattered around the world (each dungeon has three, and there's a bunch in the overworld too), augment your abilities by obtaining equippable stat altering Monster Cards (most are dropped by enemies, but the most powerful ones based on the game's bosses can only be obtained by trading Golden Nuggets, another of the game's collectables, for them in Towns), and by buying permanent upgrades in Town Shops, such as increased attack power & speed, and even a shield that invokes total invincibility (these are optional upgrades, and you can turn them on & off in the menu, if you decide you don't want to use them).
  • In addition to your various upgrades, you can buy consumable health & magic regenerating potions and weapons (such as fireballs or boomerangs) in Town Shops, and enemies regularly drop health regenerating food items as well. Along with the various upgrades mentioned before (one of which is an ability that lets you heal yourself with magic), it is entirely possible to be completely OP by at least the half way point if you so choose, as you have so many options to heal & reduce damage.

Audio/Visual

  • It's by no means a technical marvel, but it has a pleasingly crisp bright & happy look and for the most part runs smoothly (there are one or two spots with a lot going on where it can briefly slow down), and there are some unique biomes in the overworld that buck cliche trends, such as a laboratory and even a small area themed around an Otaku/Nerd's hideout, pictured below.
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  • Of particular note are the high quality (although generally short, given it's budget) anime style cutscenes, such as the one pictured below before a boss fight.
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  • I'd say it's soundtrack fits the game, but as I've mentioned before I'm not someone who gets really fussed over music in a game.

Story

  • The story itself isn't anything particularly noteworthy, though there was no indication that the underground city was really a ship, so it does have it's twists, but where it shines is in it's self awareness. It knows you're here to have a fun time so it revels in the silliness of the female characters wearing almost nothing for armor, and other punny moments, such as the one pictured below where you're tasked with collecting the "Dagron Balls".
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  • Characters are generally fun, if not very deep (I will say I look forward to each game's Squid Baron moments).

Overall

  • It's not the deepest game around, but it's nice comfort food and is just a game to smile along to.
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    Time to celebrate!

Currently Playing:
Switch - Blade Strangers
PS4 - Kingdom Hearts III, Tetris Effect (VR)

Ralizah

DOOM 3: BFG Edition

Platform: PC

Playtime: 15 or so hours

Completion status: Main campaign only so far

DOOM 3 was released in 2004 by id Software for the PC. A reboot of sorts, the game treads similar ground in terms of subject matter to previous DOOM releases, but distinguished itself with its dramatically improved id Tech 4-powered graphics and notable changes to pacing, level design, and overall atmosphere. The version of the game I recently played, however, was the 2012 BFG Edition for PC, a sort of HD remaster of the original that also makes certain controversial changes to the original game. I did previously play the original DOOM 3 when it was still a new and highly advanced PC game, so I also want to briefly compare aspects of the two releases.

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In the first of its many innovations, DOOM 3 (as well as the BFG Edition) is something of a story-driven experience. You, of course, fill in the shoes of the nameless Doomguy, a random space marine who discovers that he's very, very good at killing demons. As with previous games, you're a random nobody, but there's actually a supporting cast of characters you'll kind of come to know over the course of your adventure. Three personalities stand out: Dr. Malcolm Betruger, the primary antagonist of the game, who is corrupted by demonic influences after being transported into hell during one of his teleporter experiments, and who masterminds the invasion of the UAC facility on Mars by the hordes of hell; Thomas Kelly, your commanding officer, who works in tandem with Doomguy to try and curb the demonic invasion; and Counselor Swann, who was sent to investigate the curious goings-on and the UAC base and eventually find himself indirectly butting heads with Sergeant Kelly.

And what curious goings-on there are. Previous games in the series never really give the player a sense of what happened in the build-up to the apocalyptic events that take place, but the same absolutely cannot be said for DOOM 3. In a heavily System Shock 2-inspired change of course (like Bioshock, the entire game feels like it was heavily influenced by the design of that legendary horror-scifi-fps-rpg), DOOM 3 includes a massive amount of narrative and worldbuilding via the use of audio logs found around the base. The scientists and marines locked inside of this base have noticed weird and alarming goings-on leading to the invasion that starts off the game for months, and, lacking any other outlet, they start spilling their guts into their audio diaries. To be honest, I always find the use of audio logs to be a lazy and inorganic method of worldbuilding and storytelling, but the technique wasn't overdone in 2004, and I can buy that people trapped in a stressful environment like this might record their feelings of apprehension over various events happening around them.

But, uh, DOOM games have always been about the gameplay. Fast, fierce games with marines and demons and hell; the series has always had a very METAL identity. And now players were being given a sequel where they were being asked to slow down and appreciate the ambiance. Even as a person who loves story-heavy RPGs, I found myself quickly growing impatient with the countless audio logs where a spooked scientist would ramble about weird behavior among the higher-ups and spooky sounds at night for a minute at a time, and even moreso with the logs where some technician would start discussing some highly technical aspect of the UAC facility's operation. You don't actually have to stop when you're listening to one of the logs, of course, but good luck trying to concentrate on Dr. Spooks-a-Lot whimper about his personal problems with you walk five steps away from the location you retrieved the log and get ambushed by demons. Perhaps this was the intended playstyle. It would explain why the game feels like it almost completely lacks music (even the ambient moans and screeches of DOOM 64). No time for moody or exciting tunes as you're listening to logs, or listening to NPCs talk, or listening to some sort of automated display. There's a LOT of listening in this game.

Which, to be fair, ties into the original design philosophy of this game. DOOM 3, much to the chagrin of long-time fans, has always been more of a slow paced game. I mean, it's still a shooter (you tote around a rocket launcher, for god's sake), but DOOM 3 has always been a game designed to get you to stop, or at least slow down momentarily. Which is where the first conflict with BFG's changes come into play. The original DOOM 3 famously included a flashlight as an item in a separate weapon slot, meaning the player can't illuminate shadows and use a gun at the same time. Players have joked for years about DOOM 3 Doomguy being too stupid to duct-tape his flashlight to the muzzle of a gun, but, in the context of this game, the decision was the correct one. The player could, theoretically, just charge through the entire game with a weapon equipped, but that's a very easy way to run headlong into the waiting claws of an imp. The player had to stop and scope out their surroundings a bit before proceeding, which tapped directly into the pacing and tone of the game.

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In DOOM 3: BFG Edition, the player has a flashlight mounted on their armor, which can be activated independently of anything else they're doing. Meaning they can simultaneously see in the dark AND use their weapon. I imagine this change in the 2012 remaster was made after years of loud fan complaints about this design choice. But I want to reveal an open secret of sorts, here and now, to anyone listening. An inconvenient truth.

The loudest voices on the internet are usually the ones not worth listening to.

Look, I get the frustration with a DOOM game being a slow-paced horror affair, but, for better or worse, that was the direction the game took, and any QoL changes that conflict with the core design philosophy are not necessarily going to lead to a better game. DOOM 3 was clearly designed around the limitation of not being able to see clearly in the dark environments, and strapping a flashlight to your shoulder kind of ruins certain setpieces in this game as well. For example, in one section, you're in this lab, and some sort of conveyor device is dragging a luminescent tube through an expanse of darkness. The intention of this segment is clear: you're supposed to stick by it and shoot at the enemies who pop out at you from the surrounding darkness when they become illuminated. But the omnipresent flashlight makes this segment pointless. You can just barrel through this location with your flashlight turned on, quickly dispatching the enemies waiting to jump out at you before they know what hit them.

The changes to ammo availability also somewhat goes against the design philosophy of the original. In the original, you actually had to scrounge around to find enough ammo to feel comfortable creeping further into the UAC base's winding corridors. Hunting around dingy rooms for scraps of ammo to use against monsters is a time-tested horror game tradition. For whatever reason, though, the game likes to utterly overload the player with ammo. And not even just shotgun ammo. I was never out of heavy arms, and never felt any particular reason to conserve my ammo and actually, I dunno, fall back on my handgun or other smaller weapons, because the game stuffs its environments with so many high-level goodies. Scarcity confers value on resources and also incentivizes certain types of behaviors. I was always loaded to the teeth, so the only incentive I had to poke around most of the time was to find audio logs where someone would whine for five minutes about their personal problems with the chain of command. That is to say, no such incentives existed.

Which isn't, of course, to say that the game's horror trappings are always effective. DOOM 3's reliance on generic spooky locations, monster reinforcements that often pop up out of the shadows, random jump scares like demonic cackling that will issue when you enter a room, and hammy intercom taunting from Dr. Betruger throughout the game (the dude actually says "Your soul will be mine!" at one point during the game, like Shang Tsung from the Mortal Kombat movie, lmao) gives the game something of a haunted house flair to it. Not like an actual haunted house, mind you, but rather, like one of those places where you pay to walk around so that people dressed up like zombies or mad scientists can jump out at you and try to scare you. This impression is strengthened as you bear witness to plot events throughout, but always from a safe distance, like in a separate room where you're separated by a pane of glass.

(Dr. Betruger in another life, probably)

Speaking of ammo, I just want to say that I don't like whoever decided it was a good idea to rob me of all my carefully cultivated BFG rounds near the end of the game and make me start from scratch (for plot reasons). The ammo balancing leads to me building up a healthy collection of arms, of course, but those unused BFG rounds still haunt me.

DOOM 3's weapons game is pretty strong, although not revolutionary. Nearly all of the old weapons return here sans the super shotgun (the normal one in DOOM 3 feels sort of... piddly... I didn't use it much). There are two new additions, though: a machine gun, which is really effective against smaller enemies when you don't need the power of the chaingun, and grenades, which... honestly, only got used when there was a long hallway and something slow coming toward me, because these do splash damage, and a LOT of enemies in this game like to aggressively charge the player. For immediate long-range devastation, a rocket launcher was always preferable, and for anything closer, chainguns and beam rifles are just safer.

I'm not sure what it is, but I will say that a lot of the weapons don't have the visceral punch they did in some of the previous games. The chaingun, especially, feels less impactful compared to the one in DOOM 64.

With that said, the last weapon you get in this game, the Soul Cube, is pretty fun. Every five kills or so, you can use this supernatural cube...thing to instantly kill nearly any enemy in the game. It works quite well when you gun down a bunch of smaller enemies on the way to something particular large and annoying, and then take it down with your Rubiks-Cube-of-Death. It even replenishes your HP!

The level design in DOOM 3 can feel a bit claustrophobic throughout (there's a distinct lack of wide-open arenas to run around like in previous DOOM games, opting instead for cramped hallways and rooms loaded with boxes and industrial equipment. This fit, perhaps, with the slower, more horror-based pacing and tone of the original, although it gives it a different flavor than traditional DOOM. The levels start off almost painfully linear, although the maps do eventually increase in complexity and require some backtracking. This is perhaps a good thing, given the frustrating lack of maps (!) in this game. I rarely got lost, though, and backtracking is typically fairly limited and streamlined compared to what you might find in other games (or, indeed, other DOOM games)

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One of the strongest aspects of DOOM 3 is the enemy variety. Almost all of the classic enemies return, often in reimagined form, in addition to a host of new additions.

There are zombies in this game now. A lot of them. Like, classic Romero-type zombies that stumble around and barely know how to even use tools. These are easily dispatched. The demon soldiers are back as well, though, and there's also a lot of them. In an interesting change of pace, you can actually hear their radio chatter when they're in the area nearby, although nothing intelligible is ever said. These guys can pack pistols, shotguns, shields, or, annoyingly, even chainguns. Thankfully, no matter how potent their firepower, it's relatively easy to put them down.

The version of the Arch-Vile that shows up in DOOM 3 is a massive pain in the ass, though. Previously, they only had the power to resurrect fallen demons, and although their attack was un-dodgeable, you could prevent it by breaking line of sight with them. These guys have no such limitations: they continuously spam spells that summon new demons and their attack is now this devastating column of fire that can hit you from several feet away. Very irritating. I used my strongest weapons to put them down ASAP when they showed up.

Lost Souls also get kind of an interesting change. Instead of being flaming skulls like in previous games, they're now fleshy, eerie humanoid faces that fly around and try to bite you. Thankfully, these nuisances have been vastly nerfed compared to previous games, and they hardly register as a threat unless they flank you while you're fighting something else.

The best redesign in DOOM 3, IMO, is the way the Pinky demon was changed. The mostly harmless, melee only enemy from previous DOOM games that was only dangerous amongst an encroaching horde of demons has been reimagined as something more feral and less bipedal, like a large, demonic dog. I remember the first one you encounter in the game scared the crap out of me when I was younger. In an intense setpiece, the thing violently starting ramming itself into the locked door leading into the room your character is in, warping the metal, before moving over to a glass pane and shattering it with a charge, forcing the panicked player to quickly dispatch it. 15 years on from when I first played it, there's not so much panic now, but it's still a cool moment.

Certain other designs tend to stay constant throughout the series. The Revenant, for example, is STILL just a skeleton with rocket launchers on its shoulders, although its lower half is covered in translucent skin instead of gore like the original design. Their missiles are particularly difficult to hit in this game, since they seem to move away from your bullet fire. I have to resort to spamming my pulse rifle in a circular motion to destroy their projectiles.

Imps are also broadly similar in design, although their appear WAY more often in DOOM 3 (seriously, you can't go more than a couple of rooms without running into an Imp in this game; they're easily the most common type of enemy) and if they get close to the player, in kind of a cool change, they're crouch down and pounce.

Barons of Hell, Mancubi, and Cacodemons return without huge alterations, although the Cacodemons are much faster and flit around a lot this time.

DOOM 3 introduces the Wraith, a smaller, melee-only creature that teleports around the level, trying to catch the player off-guard along with the Cherub, which look like small, winged babies that like to flit toward the player and bite them. There are also at least two new spider-like enemies that show up, often swarming the hallways ahead of you. They don't take a lot to kill, but they can easily overpower a less cautious player.

The Commando returns from DOOM II, although his form and function are so different that he's basically a new enemy. Anyone who has played Resident Evil 3: Nemesis is likely to get flashbacks to that game's eponymous monstrosity as this muscular hulk charges toward the player and tries to impale them with a large tentacle arm. These games react so quickly and aggressively that I had an issue with them throughout the game. As soon as I saw one of these, the rocket launcher came out.

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The game has a handful of boss encounters. While they still show up sort of randomly, I'd say these fights are more engaging and memorable than boss encounters from previous DOOM games, and can actually require some modicum of strategy. Crucially, their difficult isn't dependent on being impossible to dodge when hiding behind a column of some sort. So, yeah, this is definitely the strongest DOOM game to date on that front.

The soundtrack in this game is extremely ambient, like DOOM 64's. Now, that worked for DOOM 64 because of how silent that game was when you weren't fighting demons, but this is pretty much environmental noises: the game. There's so much whirring and buzzing and narration in the background that it can be hard sometimes to even find a quiet place to listen to an audio log. Going to youtube, the soundtrack isn't half-bad, but I'd be lying if I said I even noticed music throughout this game, so I'm going to call this the weakest DOOM game for me on that front. Aside from the decent main theme, you're never going to hear anything that gets your blood pumping, or even much that's particular atmospheric, since you're so busy listening to everything else in this game.

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DOOM 3: BFG Edition on Steam features achievements, but good luck unlocking them if you like to take screenshots. For whatever reason, in a widely documented bug that was apparently never patched out, taking screenshots in this game via the Steam overlay triggers an anti-cheat measure that disables the player's ability to unlock achievements.

Technically, DOOM 3: BFG Edition barely feels like an upgrade from the original, being a very slight HD remaster that allowed the game to run smoothly on modern operating systems and widescreen displays. Texture work is still very low-res, too, which becomes clear if you try actually examining most of the displays in your environment. With that said, DOOM 3 was a massive techncial achievement when it first released thanks to a combination of cutting-edge graphics and excellent art design, and, thanks to that, the game still looks really good today. In some ways, the original looked even better: in addition to the shoulder flashlight, the game has been brightened a bit overall, dulling some of the raw dread provoked by its corridors, destroyed by demons and caked in thick shadows But the overall artistic direction still results in a world that's easy to lose yourself in.

What else to mention? DOOM 3: BFG Edition adds in a new autosave system when you hit certain checkpoints in a level, which might have been useful on consoles, but on PC, where you literally only need to hit F5 to quicksave at pretty much any given point, it felt... needless. I guess the good thing is that the player almost never has to worry about losing much progress.

I wasn't sure where to fit this in, but I also really like the security robots in this game. There'll be these interesting setpieces throughout where you'll activate a little security robot, and it'll lead you through the darkness (in the original DOOM 3, anyway). In an amazing turn of events, though, the cute little guys are also armed to the teeth with machine gun rounds, and will viciously mow down any monster that happens to be in its pre-programmed path. I think you're supposed to defend it from enemies, but I found that they killed enemies so quickly that they barely needed any input from me. Granted, I also contributed, as it wouldn't be fair to let them do all the work.

Oh, and, when it comes to difficulty settings, go with Veteran. The only real difference between the difficulty settings (other than the bottom one, which appears to be some sort of safety mode) is in how much damage you take from enemy attacks, and, on the Marine difficulty (or, god forbid, the even lower Recruit difficulty), you can shrug off most attacks with ease. Combine this with the ease of access to health packs and healing centers, and the ammo strewn literally everywhere, and you wind up with a pretty radically easy game, devoid of much of a sense of danger. Veteran difficulty alleviates this by actually making it dangerous to take damage, although it doesn't seem to balance anything else. For all intents and purposes, it's this game's Normal difficulty.

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I was curious how I'd feel about this game. Ultimately, while I think it's an interesting experience in its own right, it's easy to see how this would disappoint someone looking for a DOOM experience in the vein of the previous games. This has all the trappings of DOOM, but it's missing the attitude. Additionally, the HD remaster, while probably a better fit for modern PCs, feels like it's at war with itself, and dialing back elements that made the original DOOM 3 so controversial. But, well, no superficial change is going to alter the fact that this is more horror than it is metal. I'm glad I got to experience it again, though, and I'm hoping to complete its expansions sooner than later.

@RogerRoger

Edited on by Ralizah

Current Games:

Astral Chain (Switch)

DOOM 3: BFG Edition (PC)

Paper Mario: The Origami King (Switch)

PSN: Ralizah

Foxy-Goddess-Scotchy

Very nice review there @Ralizah as always

There is a few things you put in here that remind me of DOOM 2016 like the grenades (That I always forgot about (Though I've never really liked the Rocket Launcher as a weapon either tbh)) & the bosses (That seem to play out in a similar to the brief mention you put there)

You'll be pleased to know that there's only 6 or so audio logs in DOOM 2016 too. Though there are numerous "Data Logs" for extra text based info on the weapons, areas, demons and the likes

I've admittedly only ever heard vague hearsay regarding DOOM 3 before so it's pretty neat to finally get some actual perspective on this entry from the detailed musings of both you and RogerRoger.

It's a bit of a shame some of the unique design of it's original "controversial" incarnation was lost in the porting/updating of it as I did actually find myself quite liking the sound of it from what you've said Ral (I assume the torch is not available as a standalone weapon slot choice now seeing as it's armour mounted).

Not to mention the video you linked showcasing the updated/new Pinky demon is quite effective in setting itself up to me as a slower paced and more horror like tone.

I'll be sure to give a look/purchase sometime in the future to try myself!

Edited on by Foxy-Goddess-Scotchy

"Well that was fun. Horrible, but fun!" Fargus The Jester - Pandemonium (After a summoning a monster that destroyed his home town)

"Words don't make changes. Wounds do." Agent Black - Iconoclasts

RogerRoger

@Ralizah Well, first and foremost, I've gotta say that this is perhaps your funniest, most relaxed and conversational review yet, and I thoroughly enjoyed reading it beyond my "I also played this recently" interest. Several bits made me laugh out loud; loved it, thanks for the tag!

Beyond that, I found myself agreeing with almost every observation you made about DOOM 3. I say "almost" because I doubt I'd have been able to finish the game had the original flashlight still been a thing, so I was actually grateful for its shoulder-mounted replacement. That being said, I recognise the controversy, and how its inclusion damaged what the original release stood for (one of the earliest examples of fan outrage leading to change, perhaps?) and I even had the exact same thought as you did, in the exact same room, the one with the blue luminescent status pods being moved through the darkness.

I'm just too big of a wimp when it comes to horror. I'm also somebody who doesn't like to be frustrated or slowed by challenge and so, despite having settled for Marine myself, I completely agree with your comments about the difficulty levels. Health was plentiful, there was an abundance of ammo and overall, other than wrestling with the atmosphere and jump-scares, it was a ridiculously easy game for me. I also spammed that quicksave function like it was going out of fashion.

So we approached it from slightly different angles, perhaps, but we still agree that it's certainly a unique experience, and one that seems kinda at odds with itself at times. I'm glad to have played it, and am equally glad that you're glad to have, too (...yeah, me English good).

Although I'm sorry to hear you struggled taking screencaps, and am grateful that you managed to snap a few good ones for this review all the same! As much as I'm enjoying PC games of late, I think it was a better fit for me on PS4, especially playing on one of the lower difficulty settings. Not sure if I'd have been able to turn and aim quick enough with a DualShock4 if I bumped it up to Veteran.

Best of luck with the expansions. I'm gonna go watch the Mortal Kombat movie!

PSN ID: GDS_2421
Making It So Since 1987

Ralizah

@Foxy-Goddess-Scotchy Thanks!

😂Thank god the omnipresent audio logs are gone. The way you describe it in DOOM 2016 sounds a LOT like Metroid Prime, where the game left you to play it in piece and then allowed you to optionally scan stuff to learn more about the setting, establish lore, etc. I don't mind optional narrative, but making me stop every ten minutes and listen to a dude slowly ramble to himself so that I can learn a code to a weapons locker (or, sometimes, a door I need to pass through to progress in the game) got annoying quickly.

I forgot to mention this, but there was actually one point where I had to look at an email in my PDA in order to obtain a code I needed! It took me forever to figure that out, because there just aren't very many emails in this game, and, when I'm playing DOOM, the last thing that comes to my mind after chainsawing an Imp is "Gee, I should clean out my spam folder!"

Yeah, the flashlight isn't an item anymore like it was in the original.

I think it's worth a playthrough if you like horror games or shooters. It got a bad reputation for being so different from classic DOOM, but, taken on its own terms, its an effective game, and still highly playable today. And I imagine all of the environmental noises are quite paranoia-inducing with headphones on!

@RogerRoger Great to hear! I feel like my write-ups err a bit on the dry side at times, so I'm trying to balance that out a bit. It doesn't come close to your wittiness, but I appreciate the positive feedback.

I wouldn't mind the inclusion of the shoulder flashlight as an optional thing in the remaster. Honestly, just add an "Original Mode" where the flashlight returns as an item and it'd appeal to everyone, I think. I am glad it allowed you to enjoy the game, though.

So there's a quicksave function on console, too? It's a nice QoL feature, but its presence on consoles makes me wonder why they even bothered adding checkpoint autosaves. For the people who like to press their luck and/or just forget to save their game, I guess. Years of unexpected party wipes in JRPGs have taught me to save as often as humanly possible.

I couldn't change the difficulty officially after starting a file on the Marine difficulty, so I changed the Steam load parameters so that it automatically went to Veteran difficulty when I loaded my save. I don't think I got official credit for completing it on that difficulty, but, as established, the screenshot weirdness meant that I didn't get credit for a bunch of other stuff, either, and years of Nintendo preferentialism alongside my experience with older consoles has made me less emotionally reliant on games awarding me "trophies" than a lot of other people I know.

The ideal arrangement for me in games with shooting is still dual analog + gyro, but I've been trying to train myself to get better at controlling my character with the keyboard. I'm getting better, but I'm still far too reliant on the mouse wheel for scrolling through weapons. I just can't seem to memorize those hotkey locations.

Thankfully, there's not a lot of platforming involved with this game. I might opt for DS4 + gyro aim for DOOM 2016/Eternal, though. We'll see.

RogerRoger wrote:

I'm gonna go watch the Mortal Kombat movie!

Such a classic B-movie.

Edited on by Ralizah

Current Games:

Astral Chain (Switch)

DOOM 3: BFG Edition (PC)

Paper Mario: The Origami King (Switch)

PSN: Ralizah

RogerRoger

@Ralizah I wasn't actually kidding, Mortal Kombat is on my Prime watchlist! Didn't get around to it yesterday like I'd planned, alas, but it'll be up soon. I'm really looking forward to it.

You do yourself a disservice; you're funnier than you think!

I think you're right, I fail to see why an "original" flashlight toggle wasn't added (on PS4, when you cycle through all your weapons, there's an awkward empty space where I assume the flashlight used to be; it's just been wholesale deleted, which feels cheap). Speaking of, I'm not sure whether you'd call it a "quick" save, but you can totally pause the game and manually save your progress anywhere and everywhere, as many times as you'd like. As a fellow cautious saver, I barely noticed the checkpoints either!

Ah, the beauty of PC gaming... the other day, I downloaded a save file from a fan site, in order to circumvent a glitch in something I was playing. Sounds similar to the trick you pulled. It's amazing how trophies have transformed my approach to some games. I'm playing two titles at the moment; one on PC, which I'm enjoying and messing about with, and one on PS4, for which I'm nervously checking trophy guides every thirty seconds, making multiple saves in case I miss a cumulative criteria. It's nonsense, and I wish I could just be happy with whatever random percentage I get upon completion, but there we are.

The original shareware DOOM and Star Wars: Jedi Knight - Dark Forces II (the pair of PC shooters I grew up with) both had weapon selection mapped to the number keys, so it's what I go for by default. I will admit, scrolling through an inventory with my mouse wheel does feel pretty cool, though!

Yeah, from the looks of things, the new DOOM games are all about speed and precision with a "proper" controller, so that might be your best bet. Hope you get on with them alright!

PSN ID: GDS_2421
Making It So Since 1987

Ralizah

DOOM 3 - Resurrection of Evil expansion pack
Platform: PC
Playtime: Took roughly six hours to complete on "Veteran" difficulty

This expansion for the original DOOM 3 is included in the BFG edition, along with a new expansion pack, which I'll play next.

Untitled

Resurrection of Evil is set shortly after the events of the original DOOM 3. You play a new marine who discovers an ancient, demonic artifact that accidentally re-opens a portal to Hell again (whoops!) Gameplay is largely the same as the base game, although with two new weapons (three if you include The Artifact) and, mercifully, with far less of the audio log bloat. Things progress along at a nice clip in this expansion, and, for that reason, I actually kind of preferred it to the main campaign.

So, one of the new weapons you unlock is the Super Shotgun, returning from DOOM II and 64. It's not quite the powerhouse that it was in those games, but it still packs a punch, and despite the long and frequent reloading times, it's a great option when you need to bumrush a smaller enemy and dispatch them quickly. But, since it only holds two shells at a time, and fires both shells at once, you won't want to use this if there's more than one enemy in close proximity.

The other weapon is a lot more creative. It's called the Grabber, and if anyone has played Half-Life 2 and remembers that game's Gravity Gun, it's sort of like that, although more limited. You can grab some objects in your environment and use the gun to propel them into enemies, which usually kills the smaller ones. Speaking of small enemies, you can actually grab the lost souls with this gun, which is hilarious. Finally, you can use it to toss enemy's projectiles back at them. Specifically, the fire and plasma balls the Imp, Vulgar, and Hell Knight like to toss at the player. This is kind of clumsy, though, and the game still rains so much ammo down on the player that they're never wanting for massive firepower. I was actually able to use the Grabber to maneuver some crates in such a way as to reach inaccessible doors, although, unfortunately, they never opened to me. I was hoping it would be used for environmental puzzles, but, alas, that never really ended up working out.

Finally, you have The Artifact, a gross, beating heart that gains powers when you slay the Hell Hunter bosses who are pursuing you in this game. There are three of these big boys, who you fight in surprisingly Zelda-esque encounters (they have specific patterns and weaknesses to be exploited; you can't just mindlessly shoot at them), and each time you unlock a new power via the heart. The first boss grants you the ability to activate bullet-time, slowing the world around you to a crawl so that you can safely dispatch multiple enemies at once. The second power is one that grants you the berserk status effect, meaning that you can run around killing enemies in one punch with your bare fists. Finally, the third boss taken down grants you invulnerability for that period. All of thes abilities are cumulative each time you activate the artifact, so, after it's fully powered up, you're slowing down time and invulnerable, smashing enemies left and right with your unstoppable death punches.

This is all horrendously OP. of course, which is why some pretty strict resource requirements are imposed on the player. In order to activate The Artifact one time, you need to absorb a human soul, which you'll only find via standing over the corpses of various dead marine comrades that you routinely encounter across the game. You can also only hold up to three souls at a time. This requirement helps the player to not abuse The Artifact, but it still really helps out in a pinch.

Otherwise... yeah, it's more DOOM 3, but with fewer frustrations involved.

@RogerRoger I should re-watch it, too. In general, I need to rewatch, replay, and reread a bunch of my favorite things. I press on too much with what's new, aside from a few classics.

So, this Star Wars: Jedi Knight - Dark Forces II. Is it... worth experiencing? I've never heard of it. My experience with SW games has been limited to Galactic Battlegrounds from way back when I was in my Age of Empires phase. I really need to go on a good SW game-playing binge.

And yeah, I'm actually really looking forward to nu-DOOM. I've had DOOM 2016 for years, but just never got around to playing it. I think the release of Eternal is really what pushed me: the game just looks phenomenal, but I wanted a sense of where the series had come from first. I think it's fair to say I've achieved that perspective.

RE keyboard play, I think the big issue for me with the keyboard is that, largely growing up as a console gamer, I grew accustomed to the shape and feel of a controller. Hitting random keys on a long board just feels alien to me. The precision of aiming with the mouse makes up for it, though.

Edited on by Ralizah

Current Games:

Astral Chain (Switch)

DOOM 3: BFG Edition (PC)

Paper Mario: The Origami King (Switch)

PSN: Ralizah

RogerRoger

@Ralizah Once again, I'm in complete agreement with you. Nicely put. I felt the plot-to-gameplay ratio was much better in the expansions (if you don't have much of a story, don't drag it out) and agree that the Grabber was a missed opportunity, whilst the Artefact was an "instant win" button. I thought it was a bit cheeky of them to expand upon and ultimately show Betruger's fate in a DLC pack but then everybody was up to similar nonsense back in the day. Doesn't make it right, but there we are.

You'll have more than enough perspective for the new DOOM games, and then some! By and large, have you enjoyed your trek through the franchise's history?

Considering that mouse aiming (or mouse-based camera control) wasn't a thing back when I played shooters on PC, that's the part I often feel so awkward with. It was all "arrow keys for movement, Ctrl for fire, X to jump" and very stop-start, no matter how good you got.

Which yeah, brings us to Jedi Knight. It's the sequel to Dark Forces, which is considered one of the best DOOM clones of its day, and itself led to Jedi Outcast (which I didn't like so much, but others did) and Jedi Academy (excellent game). They're often held up as the best single-player Star Wars action games on PC and, helpfully, they're all available on GOG.com for a reasonable price. I have very fond memories of Jedi Knight, admittedly soaked in childhood nostalgia, but I still enjoyed a recent replay for what it was. I don't wanna say too much more, because it'll give key mechanics away... but sure, the next time you're in the mood for a late-90s PC action game, you could do far worse.

@nessisonett recently re-completed the game, I believe. I'm tagging them just to ensure that I'm not leading you up the garden path with any of this!

PSN ID: GDS_2421
Making It So Since 1987

nessisonett

@Ralizah @RogerRoger Yep, Jedi Knight is enjoyable for what it is, a reasonable Star Wars game with slight awkward controls, labyrinthine maps and hard as nails boss fights. I still enjoyed my time with it though, it feels like Star Wars and as long as you make good use of quick save then you shouldn’t be in too much trouble. If it’s cheap, I’d recommend it.

Socks before or after trousers, but never socks before pants, that's the rule. Makes a man look scary, like a chicken.

RogerRoger

@nessisonett Thank you!

It's less than a fiver on GOG.com and I'd call that a fair price.

PSN ID: GDS_2421
Making It So Since 1987

Ralizah

RogerRoger wrote:

You'll have more than enough perspective for the new DOOM games, and then some! By and large, have you enjoyed your trek through the franchise's history?

Yeah, I've become something of a fan. Granted, IMO, the first two games are far weaker than 64 or DOOM 3, but that's to be expected in any series that's broadly improving over time.

So far, I'd rank them:
DOOM 64
DOOM 3
DOOM II
DOOM

Although that list is a bit deceptive. I liked 64 a lot more than the other three games, and consider it to be one of my favorite first person shooters now. 2016 and Eternal are going to have to really impress to top it.

@RogerRoger @nessisonett Nice. I'll grab the lot of them next time there's a SW or site-wide sale, then.

Edited on by Ralizah

Current Games:

Astral Chain (Switch)

DOOM 3: BFG Edition (PC)

Paper Mario: The Origami King (Switch)

PSN: Ralizah

Foxy-Goddess-Scotchy

Oh thanks Ral, good to know all that extra info about DOOM 3. I'll be sure to not forget about that PDA whenever I get round to playing it!

There was one point I forgot to mention/bring up from your DOOM 3 review

Ralizah wrote:

This impression is strengthened as you bear witness to plot events throughout, but always from a safe distance, like in a separate room where you're separated by a pane of glass.

I do recall a teensy smidge of that last line in particular occurs in DOOM 2016 where you get a small speech from behind a pane of glass by the villain. Pretty sure that only happened the one time from what I recall.

You do get a few words every now and again from the supporting cast via radio or whatever but otherwise Doom 2016 is pretty light on the story beats & when you do get talked to by the very small cast half the time the Doom Marine is just not paying attention in the slightest/does his own thing which is completely against what he's being told.

For being mute I did think the Doom marine is portrayed fairly well in that.


And nice didn't realise there was already a post from you @Ralizah about one of DOOM 3's expansions! 😅

I fear there's not much I can really say about this other then yay for the super shotgun returning and the new weapon and item which both sound fairly interesting? After all you say it's basically the same as the base game with a shorter runtime and few extra bits and bobs.

I think it's safe to assume the second expansion is similar in not being too far off with a few extra bells and whistles? It's not like it becomes a point and click adventure game or anything?

Edited on by Foxy-Goddess-Scotchy

"Well that was fun. Horrible, but fun!" Fargus The Jester - Pandemonium (After a summoning a monster that destroyed his home town)

"Words don't make changes. Wounds do." Agent Black - Iconoclasts

Ralizah

@Foxy-Goddess-Scotchy

It seems like DOOM Eternal is, in a way, another story-driven entry in the series, so I'm curious to see how that manifests, since nothing I've seen or heard of the game indicates any tendency for the action to have to slow down while the player listens to people drone on for minutes at a time.

Anyway, the muteness of Doomguy in the older games seems somewhat different from the muteness of the Doom Slayer in the newer games, based on footage I've seen and bits I've played of 2016. If Pre-2016 Doomguy is the FPS equivalent of Link from The Legend of Zelda, then the Doom Slayer of the newer games in the FPS equivalent of Michael Myers. He's creepy, lacking in humanity, and utterly unstoppable.

Current Games:

Astral Chain (Switch)

DOOM 3: BFG Edition (PC)

Paper Mario: The Origami King (Switch)

PSN: Ralizah

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