Forums

Topic: Books You're Currently Reading?

Posts 441 to 460 of 482

urrutiap

Sanndman I assume you mean NNeil Gaiman's Sandman? Funny you mention that since I just started reading his novel Neverwhere.

as for the new Star Wars High Republic, I just got the hardcover of the book from Walmart couple of weeks ago. I should start reading that too besides reading Neverwhere

Spaldy wrote:

@urrutiap I literally just finished that yesterday. I've started the Dune Sequence for the first time in prep for the movie. I was less impressed by this compared to the original which I found to be an epic adventure. Messiah was mostly a lot of chapters full of people discussing politics in rooms. I'm hoping Children of Dune improves things.

I'm taking a break from that at the moment though to start Star Wars: The High Republic: Light of the Jedi.

I'm also making my way through Sandman (not sure if there's a comic book thread for that).

urrutiap

Spaldy

@urrutiap yes, Neil Gaiman's Sandman. I haven't read them since college when I borrowed them from the library but I recently began collecting graphic novels so I'm looking to complete the Sandman set. Only on Vol 2 at the moment.

Dark mode or go home.

M0rriss

Battle Ground by Jim Butcher

M0rriss

TheBrandedSwordsman

Still reading James Thurber's Complete Works.

"Ten thousand toadstools, with the right purchase, could lift a man, I suppose. But what good would it do?"

PSN: Draco_V_Ecliptic

M0rriss

TheBrandedSwordsman wrote:

Still reading James Thurber's Complete Works.

Is it hard or not enough time to read? I have been thinking about buying it for a long time, but many of my friends did not like it.

M0rriss

urrutiap

books im busy with at the moment

Neil Gaiman's Neverwhere
Star Wars Courtship of Princess Leia
Reliquary the sequel to Preston and Child's Relic

urrutiap

maryeddington

I finally decided to read The Lord Of The Rings. I am a big fan of movie trilogy but I've never read books

I'm Mary and I love painting, plants, and people.

TheBrandedSwordsman

@M0rriss Hey, sorry for the late reply, you didn't tag me so I only saw this today, it isn't hard to read at all, but it is "of it's time" so many young people today may not like it, not that I am old, I am just able to appreciate stuff from a different time, so if you can do that ,too, you should enjoy it.

"Ten thousand toadstools, with the right purchase, could lift a man, I suppose. But what good would it do?"

PSN: Draco_V_Ecliptic

MarlonJohan

I am not in the middle of this activity, but I have recently been reading tiny bits of pages or paragraphs from my xerox copy. It’s titled Republic by Plato. I don’t know if I would have the absolute level of understanding to comprehend the book's Socratic dialogue, more so when I had a hard time reading between the lines of Socrates’ trial. The language back then was not very straightforward — even harder than the Regency Period, if I may! Anyhow, I am still checking if it’s actually worth it to buy a hard copy of the said book. Any thoughts from you guys?

MarlonJohan

ellisael

Currently reading Meena Kandasamy's Exquisite Cadavers- it is SO MOVING!
I am also reading Born a Crime, especially the young learner's version for teaching it this fall. I of course enjoyed the normal edition more

Edited on by ellisael

ellisael

Elodin

Reading Hail Mary, by Andy Weir. Great so far. As good as the Martian. His second book Artemis was below average, but this one is great.

Elodin

TheBrandedSwordsman

@Th3solution I finished James Thurber's complete works, think I told you I was reading it, very funny book from the noted humorist. I'm now on to re-reading A Laodicean by Thomas Hardy, one of his minor works, unparalleled literary style from the master, of course. Are you reading anything atm? @colonelkilgore How is your sci-fi reading going? Still finding time to catch up in slower moments at work?

"Ten thousand toadstools, with the right purchase, could lift a man, I suppose. But what good would it do?"

PSN: Draco_V_Ecliptic

Th3solution

@TheBrandedSwordsman Actually I’ve been reading a little Malcolm Gladwell lately. Non-fiction, sociology content is what he’s know for, if you’ve not read him. He also has a popular podcast “Revisionist History.” Anyways, Talking to Strangers is his latest that I’m reading and it’s pretty good. I like his earlier works like Outliers, and Davids and Goliaths better, but he always makes me look at the world in a different way.

The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

————————

Forum Megapoll 2020 - Best Video Game Box Art: Xenoblade Chronicles 2: Special Edition

colonelkilgore

@TheBrandedSwordsman nah sadly work has picked right up and I'm getting no chance at all. I am able to listen to podcasts though, so I'm pretty much listening to most playstation and multiplatform shows. I'll be working from home from September onwards too, so if things does quiet down again with work I'll just have more gaming time.

Think reading will be off the docket now until I can no longer hold a controller due to arthritic hands 🙌

smells like… victory!!!!

TheBrandedSwordsman

@Th3solution Malcolm Gladwell certainly sounds interesting, I have a GCSE in Sociology so it sounds like he might be worth reading if I were to re-explore that route.

"Ten thousand toadstools, with the right purchase, could lift a man, I suppose. But what good would it do?"

PSN: Draco_V_Ecliptic

Th3solution

@TheBrandedSwordsman If you do, I’d probably start with Outliers to see if you like his style. He has about 6 or so books though, all with slightly different social subjects that he analyzes. Outliers tried to analyze what the social determinants of statistical outliers are. For example, the mega-wealthy and why certain time periods foster extreme wealth, or why most professional NHL hockey players birthdays are clustered in the same time of the year, for example. Gladwell is Canadian, but his analytics are largely focused on American phenomena so it may not interest you as much, but he does have a lot of international data too and the principles he describes apply universally. (For example the professional soccer/football leagues have the same birthday clustering curiosity too, it’s just in a different time of year). In other words, the book tries to investigate why some things which should show statistical randomness end up skewed one way or the other, and what the reasons might be for that.

Edited on by Th3solution

The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

————————

Forum Megapoll 2020 - Best Video Game Box Art: Xenoblade Chronicles 2: Special Edition

TheBrandedSwordsman

@Th3solution I may look into Outliers in that case, certainly sounds like the right one to start with in order to build up an impression of the man. Also, I took a detour from A Laodicean by Hardy to read Joey: A Loving Portrait of Alfred Perles, Together with some Bizarre Episodes relating to the Opposite Sex by Henry Miller. It's only 126 pages long, and a much more approachable read than anything in Hardy's oeuvre. Although the man is famous for Tropic of Cancer, he wrote a heck of a lot more other stuff, and was a great writer. Sometimes there's too much sex and unfortunately even a little bit of violence thrown in but it's still a great read. He was a man of his time regarding his attitude towards women, unfortunately, but it's still great, vicarious reading.

"Ten thousand toadstools, with the right purchase, could lift a man, I suppose. But what good would it do?"

PSN: Draco_V_Ecliptic

Lolwutz

I’ve recently been reading the Jirel of Joiry stories and I can recommend them to any fans of weird fiction and/or R. E. Howard. Quite surreal and almost Dark Souls-esque in places.

With regards to Gladwell; be aware there is a LOT of criticism of his methods and pretty much everything he has written has been undermined by experts in those particular fields. He is accused of often cherry-picking data, mistaking correlation for causation and using shaky sources.

Edited on by Lolwutz

Lolwutz

Th3solution

@Lolwutz Yeah, I’m aware that Gladwell has his critics. The social sciences have a lot of room for variance in opinion and methods of analysis. Nevertheless I found that his books and speeches don’t necessarily claim a lot of firm conclusions as truth, and rather they mostly lead one to draw their own conclusions or just to prompt interesting discussion points for analysis. I approach his works as fascinating observations of people and the world around us and ways to look at society through a different lens. The political ramifications will always be there, but I don’t get caught up in that.

The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

————————

Forum Megapoll 2020 - Best Video Game Box Art: Xenoblade Chronicles 2: Special Edition

Top

Please login or sign up to reply to this topic