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Topic: User Impressions/Reviews Thread

Posts 1,801 to 1,818 of 1,818

RogerRoger

@Ralizah Aww! [blushes] I'm just grateful to have somewhere to share them in some limited capacity, otherwise I think I'd feel rather silly (well, more silly than I already do)!

Absolutely no apology necessary. In fact, I should be saying sorry to you, as my propensity for conversational writing probably hasn't helped keep my answers clear. Not only that but, having kept track of the trilogy's interconnectedness in real-time over the years, I might find explaining it all a little easier, but it still doesn't make it easy! Even I think I'm missing a few bonus suits and novelty items, but I can't be bothered risking the headache to figure out what, where and when.

Put simply, to get access to everything, purchase Hitman (2016) GOTY Edition, Hitman 2: Gold Edition and then Hitman III, and play it all through Hitman III.

I don't know whether the free individual levels given away on PS Plus would unlock in the subsequent games, I'm afraid, and it's clear that they've deliberately stopped short of giving away the game's final level (Hokkaido) to ensure that people pay up. Providing you've bought it all, you can play through the trilogy's entire story in Hitman III. There's a "Campaigns" sub-menu which allows you to run through all three games in sequence, with all of the cutscenes and narrative versions of the missions listed.

The level remixes I mentioned are separate contracts which simply use the existing infrastructure of the story's main mission (for example, there's one set in Sapienza which transforms the town into a movie set, and you're tasked with assassinating the lead actor whilst he's filming a scene). They're not essential to the core storyline, and were basically the first game's DLC content, alongside the seasonal stuff and Elusive Contracts. You can totally enjoy the trilogy without them, but you'd forever see some greyed out missions on your game's menu, and they're kinda fun, so if you can get them, do so.

If you're anything like me, it'll be best to think about all this when you're ready to make a purchase, which'll be when you're ready to play through an entire trilogy of stealth games. On that day, if you need any further (needlessly verbose) assistance, give me a shout.

And I promise not to suggest buying it with Bitcoin!

***

@Rudy_Manchego Thank you! And I totally understand your hesitance, by the way. I think that's what happened to me when I first tried Hitman (2016), and why I didn't like it at first. I don't mind admitting that I've leant on guides more than a few times, when trying to trigger the really intricate stuff. I'd never find it naturally otherwise. It's incredibly daunting.

Yeah, roll on Project 007. I'm not one to pre-judge anything... but it's gonna be awesome!

"Always try to be nice, but never fail to be kind."

PSN ID: GDS_2421
Making It So Since 1987

Th3solution

@Ralizah @Rudy_Manchego If I may butt in and share some of my experience as a newcomer to the franchise, currently playing through the first game with the game club folk on yonder thread. Although, as noted, the game is pretty difficult for the uninitiated, but as @RogerRoger pointed out, there is a mechanic in the games (called “Opportunities” in the first game), where you can select a mini-storyline from the menu within a level and it holds your hand a little more and gives you some guidance on where to go to get certain things done and to acquire certain disguises to accomplish a kill. For me it’s made the game quite approachable and more enjoyable than wandering around with the full creativity and sandbox of doing it on your own. It might be considered like an easy mode for the game. Even when utilizing opportunities it can still be pretty hard, but not in a Soulsborne kind of way where you want to rage-quit, rather in a ‘my score is going to be poor, but I’m just gonna go ahead and kill some civilians because I can’t figure out how to progress otherwise and I’m sick of trying to get this stealth attack just right’ kind of way.

Anyways, just a little added perspective here from someone who’s not a veteran of the series. Definitely worth a go if/when you feel like something a little different from your standard action games.

Edited on by Th3solution

The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

————————

Forum Megapoll 2020 - Best Video Game Box Art: Xenoblade Chronicles 2: Special Edition

RogerRoger

@Th3solution Good shout, thanks buddy!

"Always try to be nice, but never fail to be kind."

PSN ID: GDS_2421
Making It So Since 1987

RR529

Star Wars: Republic Commando (Switch)
Untitled
Tactical FPS set in a galaxy far, far away heads out on a Nintendo platform for the first time ever (originally an OG Xbox console exclusive).

Gameplay:

  • A Tactical FPS, it sees you and 3 AI teammates working your way through three different campaigns (each split up into multiple missions) in largely linear fashion. Each campaign should take you only a few hours each, for a total playtime of 9-10 hours (maybe less, depending on how adept you are at it).
  • While there were small instances of stuff like a teammate getting in my line of fire (and friendly fire IS a thing, so you can hurt each other & yourself with your own grenades & the like) your ally AI is surprisingly good and they're generally pretty good at taking care of themselves. However taking command is a requirement for success, and there are two types of commands you can give out to them.
  • The first of which are more general all encompassing orders triggered by a combination of the "A" button & a D-Pad input. You have "Search & Destroy" (the default command, this leaves your squad to their own devices, for better or worse), "Form Up" (they'll stay close to you), "Secure Position" (they'll defend the spot you're currently aiming at), & "Cancel Manoeuver" (this cancels all commands currently engaged). Also, pressing "A" while aiming at an enemy will cause your squad to focus on it exclusively. I personally like to have everyone "Form Up" after clearing a room, as once too often I'll be rooting around for any dropped ammo only to learn that my squad took it upon themselves to advance to the next room engaging the enemy before I was ready.
  • The other type are more specific orders given to a single member. You'll see symbols littered throughout the environment that denote things such as sniping & grenade positions, mountable turrets, hackable computer terminals, surfaces to place an explosive charge, & more. Simply aim at one of these symbols & press "A" for the nearest squadmate to take up position. Many of these things you can also do yourself (as seen below), & you'll have to decide whether it's better for you to place a charge or hack a terminal yourself, or to help provide cover for an AI ally to do so instead (most charges & terminals can be activated in 10 seconds, but some take into the minutes to activate). To cancel these more specific positions, aim at the location & press "A" again, or use the "Cancel Manoeuver" command (this affects everyone though). If everyone is already locked into a position when you pick a new one, the furthest back squad mate will drop his current position for the new one. If you don't call off a squadmate's command they will stay there even after you've moved on, so make sure you keep tabs on them.
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  • You'll need to make use of these commands too, else you'll run into situations where you'll be routinely slaughtered until you think of the right strategy. It isn't an easy game (I played on Normal) & there are some sudden difficulty spikes in spots, but it does a lot to ease the frustration. Firstly, it isn't a game over until everyone is dead as you can indefinitely revive your allies (to half health) & they can revive you as well. Secondly there are healing stations (called Bacta Tanks) installed liberally through the levels that have unlimited uses (usually every couple rooms, or even stationed around an area you're expected to hold for several minutes). Allies will heal up automatically if they're gravely injured, but you can also command them manually to top off too. Finally, auto saves come pretty quickly & you can make manual saves at any time as well, which particularly comes in handy as this is an older game & the auto save system will put you into some unfavorable positions at times.
  • I also want to point out that in terms of structure I think it fits the Switch surprisingly well. Each of the three campaigns has 4-6 missions, and each of those is usually broken down into several smaller segments (probably for loading purposes). Each segment is usually just a few rooms big, which (alongside the frequent saving ability) makes the whole thing pretty digestible in more bite size sessions.
  • The UI is organically built into the presentation as well. You view the world through the helmet of your Clone Trooper, and UI elements such as your (easily depleted) sheild power, health (as well as that of your squad), & equipped grenade type appear to be part of your helmet's display. Also, a wrapon's total ammo (as well as what's left in it's current clip) is built directly into it's design, all of which you can see in the screenshot below. While this is mostly cook, one small problem with this approach is the one timed objective in the game. The first campaign is capped off with a task that must be completed in 5 minutes (IMO, the hardest part of the game, since it requires a more gung ho approach that kind of runs counter to the tactical nature of the rest of the game), but it isn't made immediately apparent as the countdown is presented sort of in the background by the computerized voice of the facility you're in (there's no on screen representation of it), and you don't really realize the countdown isn't just for effect (as there'll be ominous warnings elsewhere presented similarly which are just that) until it's too late.
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  • Let's talk ordinance, shall we? There are three weapons you'll have on you at all times (technically, 3 configurations of the same weapon), the first of which is an Assault Rifle (the default configuration, you access it by pressing up on the D-Pad), a Sniping configuration (press right on the D-Pad), & an Anti-Armor configuration (launches charges that really obliterate enemies but only holds 4 shots at a time, press left on the D-Pad to access it). Ammo for these weapons tend to be lying around after every other skirmish, usually near Bacta Tanks or in the corners/slightly hidden nooks of larger rooms you may be fighting in for awhile.
  • Other than those you can also pick up enemy weapons (of which you can hold one at a time), which are accessed by pressing down on the D-Pad. These range from Assault Rifles, Shotguns, Bowguns, Laser Cannons, Concussion Rifles, to Rocket Launchers. My favorite was a heavy duty Chain Gun which could really mow down foes. To replenish ammo simply walk over a dropped weapon of the same type you're currently in possession of.
  • If you run completely out of ammo you'll revert to a basic laser blaster that has unlimited ammo, but an overheating feature so you can't just spam it. You can also access it at any time by double tapping down on the D-Pad if you want to conserve ammo elsewhere or for whatever other reason.
  • You also have 4 grenade types at your disposal (of which you can hold up to 5 of each), and you cycle through them with "L" (the game never tells you this though, and you don't automatically switch over to the next type when you run out of another, so it took awhile to figure out). Thermal Detonators are your basic grenades & EMP Grenades are extra effective against Droid based foes, but you also have Sonic Detonators (I'm not sure what specific effect these have, but I'm guessing they may be extra effective against organic enemies?), as well as Flash Grenades that temporarily blind enemies. Extras are often found alongside the ammo for your main 3 weapon types.
  • You'll need to know when and where to use what weapon, as some enemies (particularly the tougher Droid types) are absolute bullet sponges unless under the effect of an EMP Grenade or picked off by a couple of well aimed shot of the Sniping configuration. The game likes throwing new enemies (or altered versions of current ones) at you at a pretty regular pace throughout the first 2 campaigns, and while the final campaign only introduces one new enemy type, it's an absolute doozy that'll ask the most of you whenever it shows up (plus, enemy types introduced in the first campaign that skipped the second return here, so it throws everything you've been introduced to at you).
  • Other things to note are that "L2" & "R2" are used to lob grenades & fire your weapon respectively (pressing the right stick as a button lets you aim down your sight), "R" cycles visor modes (in addition to your standard view you have a "Low Light Mode" that gives everything a lo-fi black & white look that lets you see in dark places, and a "Tactical Mode" that adds some extra noise to your view, though I'm not sure it's exact purpose), "B" performs a melee attack, "Y" is jump (I literally got stuck at a downed pipe for 10 minutes as I didn't know you could do this, lol), & "X" reloads. Oh, and you have to press the left stick as a button to crouch (and hold it down to keep doing so), which is a bit of a pain.
  • You unlock development extras such as videos of concept art or developer interviews after clearing each campaign, but much like the pre rendered cutscenes in titles such as Onimusha & the Devil May Cry games, no attempt has been made to remaster these videos into HD. Also, I think there might be a glitch as the last one didn't unlock after I finished the last campaign which the game stipulates as it's unlock condition (not a huge deal though).

Story:

  • Set during the events of the "Clone Wars" in Star Wars canon (though I'm not sure if the events are still considered as such after the big Disney retcon), the game does away with lightsabers & Jedi & instead follows "Delta Squad" (of which you're the commander), a specially trained strikeforce of Clone Troopers who take on missions of insurmountable odds in support of the Republic's war efforts. You exist on the periphery of the overall Star Wars narrative and as such there's no game long story arc (each campaign, though played through in a set order, is largely stand alone), and what few famous figures do appear (such as the shot of the villainous General Grievous below) do so in fleeting cameos. What the game lacks in overall narrative & recognizable faces it makes up for with a strong brotherhood between your squad (who'll begin to rib each other with playful "Bro" talk as you get further in) & a surprisingly gritty war torn atmosphere for the Star Wars universe.
    Untitled
  • The first campaign takes place during a major battle on the rocky desert world of Geonosis (I believe it's supposed to be the same battle featured during the climax of the Star Wars: Attack of the Clones! film), and while your team is first sent in for an assassination mission, the powers that be decide you may as well destroy the enemy HQ while you're there. Despite the generally limited scope of being a linear shooter it does a great job of making you feel like you're in the middle of a massive battle, and it's all that action on the periphery that I believe helps contribute to Switch's frame rate woes (while frame rate hiccups do appear elsewhere, they feel most prominent during the opening campaign).
    Untitled
  • The second campaign takes place on a Republic Assault Ship which has sent out a distress signal, and it's my absolute favorite of the bunch. Your team is split up at the onset of the mission, and due to the isolation & the foreboding atmosphere of "something" gone wrong (such as dead Clone Troopers), which builds up to seeing other Clone Troopers assailed by myserious assailants just out of your reach, and ultimately a tense solo trek which sees enemies surprising you by jumping out of grates & other sudden encounters, it gives off an almost Metroid vibe that's unlike anything else in the game, and it feels good to finally meet back up with your squad to kick some butt and take the ship back. Untitled
  • The final campaign sees you off to Kashyyyk, the forested homeworld of the Wookies, where you must free the imprisoned resistance & help them retake their occupied home. I'm sure it'll put a huge smile on any Star Wars fan's face to team up with the famous creatures, and it is neat to see them toss around foes like ragdolls (and similarly sad to see them die due to their tendency to rush headfirst into danger). Untitled
  • The narrative unfolds organically as you play, and as such there's a minimum of cutscenes (and nothing pre-rendered). The game does have brief prologue & epilogue scenes that bookend the adventure, but even in those you can move the camera around to some degree. Each campaign will also start you off rooted in place as your squad huddles around a hologram of your commanding officer (usually riding in a transport vessel where you can look out the door to the action outside), but once it puts things in your control it never wrestles the controls from you to focus the scene, as more modern adventure games tend to do.

Visual Audio:

  • It has a grittier take on the franchise to really focus on the wartorn aspect of it all, and while there can be a bit of hallway deja vu in the design every now and then, I generally feel it changes things up just often enough where it never feels too repetitive. There's at least one screenshot from each of the three campaigns below, but picking them out I had to keep myself from making it all Assault Ship shots. While it is the most "hallway-ized" campaign in the game, due to the simpler geometric shapes that make up it's environments I felt like it held up the best graphically (I didn't post a screenshot of one, but there are these vents you occasionally crawl through in the early portion that have a heat effect, and I thought these looked really good). Untitled
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  • There's a great attention to detail in the action as well, as your visor will be smeared by raindrops in rainy areas & enemy "blood" (black from Droids, orange from the insect like Geonosians, & green from the lizard like Trandosians) whenever you get a kill up close, which is quickly wiped away by a an electric "wiper" (this you can see back in my UI screenshot).
  • There's a lot of recognizable elements from the wider franchise present, whether it be the unmistakable blaster sounds & musical cues, to common enemies such as the Battle Droids, Super Battle Droids, & Droidekas (which I've always called "rolly poly robots" until now, lol) which appear prominently in the prequel films, as well as the aforementioned Wookies & the unmentioned R2 units that roam the halls of the Assault Ship.
  • The big convo regarding the Switch version is in relashion to the aforementioned frame drops, and while a patch is promised for early May to fix the issue, as I write this I can say that the issue is currently pretty prominent. It wasn't enough to keep me from enjoying the game & I felt like they became less frequent the further I got, but if you have any issue with this at all it may be better to wait for the patch (and as an OG Xbox game the problem shouldn't have been there to begin with in all honesty).

Conclusion:

  • It may have it's share of technical hiccups and general dated elements, but this is still a really strong example of the genre. I may not rate it quite as highly as other gen 6 HD conversions like FFX & Okami (though genre bias will play a part in your own ranking), but I'm more than glad to have been able to play it on Switch and as always hope to see more games from the era cleaned up and given a new lease on life.
    Untitled
    Accomplished, your mission is.

Currently Playing:
Switch - Blade Strangers
PS4 - Kingdom Hearts III, Tetris Effect (VR)

RR529

@RogerRoger, great write-up on Hitman III BTW. They really don't look like my kind of games, but I'm glad you had fun with them in spite of the online requirements. They do look very pretty though.

Currently Playing:
Switch - Blade Strangers
PS4 - Kingdom Hearts III, Tetris Effect (VR)

timleon

@RR529 Great One Piece review!

I've had this downloaded onto my Switch for a while, but now I think I might actually pick it up. The colourful aesthetic and the (by the sounds of it) relatively simple gameplay make it seem like a nice casual pick-up for the spring months. I'm not the biggest follower of One Piece but I like the setting and enjoyed Pirate Warriors 3, so I'm sure I'll have a decent time with this.

Previously "Buizel" and "HunterLeon"

Currently playing:
Switch: New Pokemon Snap, Persona 5 Strikers, Pokemon Mystery Dungeon: Rescue Team DX
3DS: Pokemon Crystal, Pokemon Trading Card Game

RogerRoger

@RR529 Ah, nuts. You beat me. [screws up pages of Star Wars: Republic Commando notes and throws them out an open window]

Only kidding! Seriously, great write-up of the game there. I have very little to add, other than to note the perfect timing of the release, what with The Bad Batch preparing to debut next week. I have a feeling it's the closest we'll ever get to seeing where the infamously-cancelled Imperial Commando sequel might've gone, at least in terms of broad story strokes.

Between us, we've played everything but the Xbox version. I can't decide whether I prefer the PS4 remaster or the original PC port, as both have merits lacking in the other. It's a shame Aspyr haven't managed to patch the Switch framerate issue yet. They're usually faster than this.

Awesome stuff, and very well-covered... oh, and thanks for the Hitman III feedback, too!

"Always try to be nice, but never fail to be kind."

PSN ID: GDS_2421
Making It So Since 1987

RR529

@timleon, thanks for reading! The bosses can get pretty tough, but nothing you can't cheese with a bunch of healing items. Other than that though it was a nice filler/time killing game.

@RogerRoger, given your extensive Star Wars knowledge I'm glad you didn't notice much oversight in my write-up (it means I was pretty thorough).

Out of curiosity, as far as you know would Imperial Commando have starred the same squad? From what little I know of the Star Wars universe it doesn't really seem like clones are a part of the Empire's forces, and while I know that's because they weren't thinking that far ahead (or in this case behind) back when making the original films, I always kind of wondered what the in-universe explanation was for having these hundreds (thousands?) of clones (not to mention Battle Droids on the other end) be effectively non-existent a mere 20-30 years later (I know Boba Fett is one, though one with a regular aging process). Did they somehow lose the ability to make more?

Edited on by RR529

Currently Playing:
Switch - Blade Strangers
PS4 - Kingdom Hearts III, Tetris Effect (VR)

RogerRoger

@RR529 Apparently yes, it would have. It's why one of the squad suddenly goes missing right at the end, which was a deliberate sequel hook. Details are vague, but it's likely you would've started the game still loyal to the Republic, trying to rescue him, until Order 66 gets activated and you turn on the Jedi. Which might explain why it got cancelled, as that'd be an incredibly dark thing to enact.

There have been numerous answers to your question over the years, via varying levels of canon, which is why I think The Bad Batch is gonna be so interesting (because it's basically the premise of the show). The most logical explanation I've heard is that, because of the rapid ageing, the Empire simply had to phase them out during the twenty years before A New Hope, and it was too expensive to grow replacements, so they just started recruitment drives instead. Others point to Imperial racism, or the political desire to cast off anything associated with the "old ways" (especially evidence which could be used to expose Palpatine's treachery). If you think about it, the Clones were genetically bred to be traitors, so I'm sure the creeping paranoia of a totalitarian regime would've had a field day with that, too.

But there's a whole chunk of "history" there which we've never explored and, according to some books and comics, some Clones continued to serve the Empire for a good few years before retirement. As for the Droid Army, that was just a simple switch-flick; Vader shut them down, and they all got melted in order to build Star Destroyers and whatnot (although some battalions were retained by private warlords, and have turned up in various media set throughout the ongoing timeline).

"Always try to be nice, but never fail to be kind."

PSN ID: GDS_2421
Making It So Since 1987

Ralizah

@RR529 Interesting piece! I've never heard of the game before, but a "tactical FPS" sounds interesting. While I do love the mindless, frenetic DOOM approach, I can also appreciate the idea of a FPS that forces you to take positioning and environmental factors into account as well. The larger mythos connected to the prequels would probably be wasted on me, though.

As usual, lots of great detail, and you did good job capturing the 'look' of the game in your screenshots.

There are a few remasters of games coming out from that generation that have technical issues, and it really is quite surprising, isn't it? Even the relatively weak Switch is still vastly more capable than consoles from a few generations back. Makes me think there are issues with the coding that makes certain titles from that era harder to remaster without issue.

Edited on by Ralizah

ACTIVELY PLAYING
Persona 5 Royal (PS4)
Switch FC: SW-2726-5961-1794

PSN: Ralizah

timleon

New Super Lucky's Tale
Platform: Nintendo Switch

For a while it seemed like the 3D Platformer genre was dead - but from Nintendo's big splashes with Super Mario Odyssey, Super Mario 3D All-Stars and Super Mario 3D World (+ Bowser's Fury), to Activision-Blizzard's revival of the Crash and Spyro franchises, to the upcoming release of Ratchet and Clank Rift Apart, it seems this genre is getting the most love its seen since the early 2000s. The original Super Lucky's Tale - an Xbox One and PC exclusive - seemed a timely release in 2017, not only capitalising on the emergence of this trend, but providing a charming homage to classic 3D platformers on a platform that was in desperate need of compelling exclusives. Despite this, the game sorta just came...and went. I played an hour or so of Super Lucky's Tale at the time and, while it seemed interesting enough, I never took it past the first few levels or so - it was, after all, competing with Super Mario Odyssey for my interest.

Come 2019 and Super Lucky's Tale was to reborn as New Super Lucky's Tale on the Nintendo Switch - not only would the game make it to a non-Microsoft platform, but it would be portable, and include a fully controllable camera. These features made the game all-the-more compelling so I took a dive and picked it up for Nintendo Switch. The Switch port is serviceable enough, with the art style scaling well in both handheld and docked mode (the latter of which, I believe runs in 1080p), and the game generally running at a steady 30fps. The added camera control adds a whole new layer of depth and immersion to the game, which is certainly welcome.

New Super Lucky's Tale is a modern 3D platformer with collectathon elements. In typical platformer fashion, the player controls the titular fox character, Lucky, progressing through numerous worlds, stages, and bosses to complete the game's main objective, while collecting magical "Pages" along the way. The game is divided into 5 worlds, each of which contains numerous levels, puzzle challenges, and a boss fight.

At their most basic, levels require that Lucky complete an objective (usually reaching the end of the level), to collect the level's completion Page. However, each level will also contain three other pages: a Letter Page (for collecting 5 letters, each spelling out Lucky's name, akin to the KONG tokens in Donkey Kong Country), a Coin Page (for collecting at least 300 coins), and a Hidden Page (for completing some sort of hidden task, often a platforming challenge requiring the collection of coloured coins under a time limit). Although these are optional, a number of Pages are need to complete the game, and, as standard in the collectathon genre, you will probably find yourself motivated to collect everything anyway (especially as none of these tend to be too far out of your way).

The levels themselves come in various different flavours, from more open designs to more streamlined, 2D design. On the one extreme, you have more open, objective-based levels akin to those in Spyro 2/3, Banjo Kazooie and Super Mario Sunshine, where many collectables are obtained by performing certain tasks such as finding an NPC's chickens. Other 3D levels are more akin to Super Mario 3D World's focus on purer platforming challenges. Some stages are in 2D, granting a feel similar to the side-scrolling levels of Crash Bandicoot games, or the Donkey Kong Country series; and many of these levels are auto-scrolling. This juxtaposition of predictable objective structure and varied level designs is welcome - while the varied levels keep things fresh, the familiar objectives add a level of comfort to the game's progression, ensuring that no part of the game is too strenuous or frustrating. Unfortunately, however, I will say that the 2D sections tend to be weaker, as Lucky's platforming isn't quite tight enough for the challenges in these levels to be as satisfying as other games in the genre. Moreover, the 2D level design doesn't seem to blend quite as well with the collectathon nature of the game - in the autorun stages especially, these will be over within a couple of minutes, and rather than testing your platforming skills by having you get a perfect or near-perfect run, I always found that playing 2 or 3 times through was enough to get all of the Pages anyway.

Outside of levels you have puzzle stages and boss fights. Personally, I found puzzle stages to be a welcome break from the platforming, although I can see a lot of people not wanting to do these. One puzzle type - involving moving statues across paths to reach a certain point - requires more thinking than platforming skill, and I really enjoyed this - in fact, I found this to be the most challenging part of the game before the final boss. Other puzzle levels replicate your typical ball rotation maze / collectathon (think Monkey Ball physics). Personally these aren't my thing, but they weren't overly abundant in the main game (although did overstay their welcome in the post-game, in my opinion). Boss fights are generally solid - being mostly based around platforming and maintaining your footing as the boss attacks you, before finding an opportunity to hit them. The final boss unfortunately was an exercise in frustration, being the most difficult part of the game only because of the need to attack numerous floating enemies, viewing from a fixed camera angle in which the player has very little perception of depth.

One great thing about this game is how Lucky controls. Lucky has a fairly standard repertoire of 3D platformer moves - a double jump, and a tail whip attack, for example. But his notable technique is his ability to dig underground by pressing the ZL or ZR buttons. This allows him to pick up items underground, to attack enemies from below, and to get underneath certain barriers. In practice this feels very much like swimming through ink in Splatoon. What's also great about this move is that, when on hardened surfaces that Lucky can't dig through, he instead skids, adding a bit of acceleration to his movement. This adds a great sense of flow and momentum to his movement, and generally Lucky is great to control. As alluded to earlier, however, while his moveset is greatly fine-tuned for 3D platforming, I find that his jump arc and double-jump are less suited to precise 2D platforming - not terrible, but his strength is definitely in a 3D space.

Overall you've probably got the impression that this is quite an easy game, and...that's because, for the most part, it is. In fact I'd say it's perfect for someone's first platformer, or for someone (like me) looking for a comforting game after a difficult day, or something that won't have you exert too much mental energy. The post-game adds a few extra challenges which do dial up the difficulty a little - however this part of the game also lacks Page collection so, personally, I didn't find it as compelling as the main game, despite the welcome addition of some extra challenge. Regardless, this game is pure 3D platforming comfort food and I'd recommend it to anyone who's not too bothered by a game being easy for that reason.

Finally, you'll note that I've mentioned a lot of other games in this review. This is partly because I'm a big fan of the genre, but also partly because the game borrows so much from other games in the genre, but not in a bad way. I don't think this game does anything particularly original, but what is original about this game is how it weaves everything together - definitely a case of the sum being more than its parts. You may feel like you've seen everything this game has to offer before, but IMO it didn't detract too much from my enjoyment.

Verdict: New Super Lucky's Tale is pure 3D platforming comfort food. While not particularly original, nor are its 2D sections particularly strong compared to some other games, it is a charming game that brings together some of the best aspects of the genre into a compact, charming, and easy-going experience. B+

Edited on by timleon

Previously "Buizel" and "HunterLeon"

Currently playing:
Switch: New Pokemon Snap, Persona 5 Strikers, Pokemon Mystery Dungeon: Rescue Team DX
3DS: Pokemon Crystal, Pokemon Trading Card Game

RogerRoger

@timleon Great review, especially because you drew the right comparisons at the right moments. I haven't played Super Lucky's Tale for myself, but I've enjoyed hearing people's thoughts on the game, and have watched some gameplay knowing that I'll get it someday. Your descriptions and overall analysis have only reinforced my resolve to do so. Thanks for sharing!

"Always try to be nice, but never fail to be kind."

PSN ID: GDS_2421
Making It So Since 1987

RR529

@timleon, great NSLT review! I played it early last year & I think my thoughts were pretty much in line with your own (I think my write-up on it is in this thread somewhere).

Currently Playing:
Switch - Blade Strangers
PS4 - Kingdom Hearts III, Tetris Effect (VR)

timleon

@RogerRoger Thanks! Definitely recommend it for those moments where you're after something laid back or inoffensive.

@RR529 Thanks also. Just managed to track down your review actually - yeah, I'd say I pretty much agree on all points!

Previously "Buizel" and "HunterLeon"

Currently playing:
Switch: New Pokemon Snap, Persona 5 Strikers, Pokemon Mystery Dungeon: Rescue Team DX
3DS: Pokemon Crystal, Pokemon Trading Card Game

Ralizah

@timleon Great piece on New Super Lucky's Tale! It's one of those games I keep intending to pick up and failing to do so, but it always struck me as a decent (if not hugely original) take on the sort of collectathon 3D platforming adventures that blossomed in the late 90s and early 00s.

I usually enjoy games like this when I play them. Hearing your praise, I might need to pick it up sooner than later.

ACTIVELY PLAYING
Persona 5 Royal (PS4)
Switch FC: SW-2726-5961-1794

PSN: Ralizah

timleon

@Ralizah Thanks, and that's great! Do post on here if you ever give it a try!

Previously "Buizel" and "HunterLeon"

Currently playing:
Switch: New Pokemon Snap, Persona 5 Strikers, Pokemon Mystery Dungeon: Rescue Team DX
3DS: Pokemon Crystal, Pokemon Trading Card Game

crimsontadpoles

IA/VT Colorful. It's a rhythm game for the PS Vita starring the vocaloid IA. Unfortunately this was never released outside of Japan. The actual gameplay doesn't require understanding Japanese, as it's just pushing the indicated buttons to the tune of the music. The menu headers are in English, but all the important text is in Japanese. Most things can be figured out with trial and error, but it'll be worth players having a quick read of a guide online to understand the different aspects of the game.

The gameplay is fairly standard rhythm game stuff. Prompts will appear on the screen corresponding to the face buttons and directional buttons, and players have to press the buttons to the rhythm. Unlike most other rhythm games, there's no health meter. If you miss too many notes, you just get a bad score at the end of the song. It's also more forgiving with the timings than the Hatsune Miku games, making it easier to get high combos.

The two main modes of the game are "Free Play" and "Step Up" mode. Free Play lets you play the songs normally. More songs unlock as you level up. There's 3 difficulties for each song, though Hard difficulty is only unlocked after beating that song on Normal difficulty. Step Up mode is a sequence of challenges. These require playing specific songs, along with specific additional criteria. Most of the challenges aren't too difficult, but some of the later ones can get insanely hard.

I managed to get the Platinum trophy for it, which is my 15th Platinum trophy. There were some tedious trophies there, such as playing every song on Easy, Normal, and Hard difficulty, or using every single costume. The hardest trophies involve completing enough challenges in the Step Up mode. Thankfully it doesn't require doing every challenge, but it does need to do some of the super tough ones.

There's 60 songs in the main game (and another 19 songs available via DLC, though that was too much hassle for me since it require a Japanese PSN account). I was quite impressed with the tracks, and there's plenty of catchy songs in the game. I'll post a few of them below.

Main theme tune:

Another good one:

And my personal favourite. At over 7 and a half minutes, it's by far the longest song in the game:

Edited on by crimsontadpoles

RogerRoger

@crimsontadpoles Congratulations on your fifteenth platinum! My experience with rhythm games is severely limited, but I do love the concept. Do you speak / read any Japanese, or did you literally have to have a translation in your other hand whilst navigating the menus?

"Always try to be nice, but never fail to be kind."

PSN ID: GDS_2421
Making It So Since 1987

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