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Topic: Unpopular Gaming Opinions

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FullbringIchigo

RogerRoger wrote:

Have your ultra-realistic, gore-filled, profanity-laced, semi-naked gameplay. Just make absolutely certain that it isn't being sold to kids, please.

yeah but then they wont be able to sell Call of Duty to it's main demographic, the 12 year olds

(just kidding of course but yeah your right the whole system needs an overhaul)

"I pity you. You just don't get it at all...there's not a thing I don't cherish!"

"Now! This is it! Now is the time to choose! Die and be free of pain or live and fight your sorrow! Now is the time to shape your stories! Your fate is in your hands!

KirbyTheVampire

@RogerRoger I agree with that. Mature content is only really an issue if someone views it who isn't mature enough to understand what it is they're seeing and the fact that some things that happen in games should not happen among real people. Little kids should not be seeing things such as boobs or a ton of violence IMO. The ESRB ratings are there for a reason, and should be adhered to. (With exceptions. For example, I don't think you need to wait until you're 18 to play a game like Skyrim. Anyone 13+ should generally be okay with a game like that)

KirbyTheVampire

Kidfried

@adf86 Agree on point 5. I'd even go as far to say this goes for most Nintendo devs. Just a few of them really make a difference, but most of what they do is utter forgetful.

More impopular opinions:

  • It doesn't matter who has the biggest surprises at E3, what matters is the quality of games.
  • New franchises are underrated.

Kidfried

JohnnyShoulder

Not sure if the ratings system for games needs overhauling or anything as games with that kind of content are rated 18 anyhow? I don't remember seeing anything in a game and thinking that there was unsuitable content for the age rating. I agree parents need to take more responsibility and need to be made aware of how realistic games can be.

@RogerRoger I think you have may have been miss informed about The Witcher 3. Sure it has all of those things, but I didn't think it was absoulety full of it. And it certainly has it's fair share of lighter moments and quests, it is not all dark fantasy. And when those moments do happen they are handled in the utter most correct way, something that I feel some games can fudge up.

Edited on by JohnnyShoulder

We are now in a world of people being offended for other people who they think should be offended, who arent offended.
Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and remove all doubt.

PSN: JohnnyShoulder

BAMozzy

The ratings system is somewhat 'harsh' for gaming compared to movies for example. There is more nudity, sex etc in a 15 rated movie than there is in games that's rated 18 because of this - in fact nudity and Sex is virtually taboo in gaming but much more common in movies. To a degree, I can understand as gaming has objectified women and its not easy to do it without accusation. I have seen 15 rated horror movies with more gore than in 18 rated games. I have seen more violence, more graphic too in some 15 rated movies. More swearing/bad language too.

I have heard people justify the difference by saying that games are more immersive or that its 'you' performing the violence by shooting/killing NPC's but on the flip side, you don't get respawning in movies where death is permanent and the fact that people know its a 'game' where movies look more real, more like the news.

There have been 'war' films with much more blood, gore and 'emotional' impact that playing games like CoD or Battlefield - I think CoD is more likely to be 18 rated for its Zombies in recent years but a lot of the 18 rated games are no worse than most 15 rated movies. Its as if the gaming ratings are 30/40yrs behind where the movies are. you look at some of the 18 rated movies in the 80's and compare those to 15 rated movies today...

Being a parent AND a gamer does put me in a good position to know exactly what the content of games is and where my children are at too. I wouldn't let my son play games like Dead Space when they were 10 or 12 but I wouldn't stop him now he is nearly 17 and watches horror movies that are more horrifying and graphic - that are 15 rated but again that comes from knowing exactly what the game is, what my son watches and whether or not those have 'negative' impact.

I do think though that a lot of parents don't know their kids, not gamers themselves and pay no attention to age ratings. They are just 'games' in their mind...

A pessimist is just an optimist with experience!

Why can't life be like gaming? Why can't I restart from an earlier checkpoint??

Feel free to add me but please send a message so I know where you know me from...

PSN: TaimeDowne

Jaz007

@RogerRoger Parents absolutely need to be more responsible. COD and GTA (Rockstar agrees that parents should be more responsible even) are great example of parents being dumb and irresponsible. My parents asked not only what the age rating was, but the descriptions were. I think more parents should do that for sure.
I do think the ESRB is good overall, Pegi seems more messed up. I do think more specifics could be nice the though in both. Exmaple: Strong language, okay this could mean it has the F word once or every other word, very unhelpful and uninformative.

@BAMozzy I agree that the pegi system seems weird. Star Wars Battlefront shouldn’t be 16, it’s the mildest FPS we’ve seen in a while

Another unpopular opinion: I think the industry has lost its balance in terms of content. The ratio of M rated game is a bit ridiculous. We don’t a mature take on everything. I also think more games should have content filters kind of like Treyarch’s COD games have and such. It’s a great option for players.

Jaz007

BAMozzy

@Jaz007 Battlefront is a classic example of the difference between the ratings in Games and Movies. There is absolutely nothing in these that warrants that - at most they should be PG (or equivalent) - although being online could expose youngsters to foul and abusive language from other gamers but the game itself does not merit a 16 rating.

I don't necessarily agree that games should have 'content' filters for the benefit of 'younger' players. At the end of the day, these are for personal preference and not for kids. I guess if you are streaming or have kids watching you play, then there is a reason to have these filters but would you trust your kids not to turn these filters off - unless you plan to sit and watch them play. I used to watch my kids occasionally, keep them in earshot mostly but also happy to let them play on their own. I always arranged my games in 'age' order and my kids new which games they could play. I also wouldn't play the 'adult' games whilst they were around. I wouldn't have had an issue with playing Battlefront if they were 'old' enough to watch the films.

I do think though that the gaming and movie ratings should be very similar - especially so that parents etc can have a better understanding. Most people will have an idea of what a 15/18 film may contain. Even the trailers of films often can relate to the age rating but you see a lot of game trailers or snippets of game-play and you can't understand why the rating is so high. GTA's story trailer is no worse than some 12 rated movies and if you see a bit of game-play where they are just driving around, there is nothing that indicates it warrants an 18 rating. I think if they were treated like movies, rated like movies etc, then parents would have a better idea - even if they do bother to watch a trailer. Most of the mature games should be 12 or 15 max - if they were, then those that should be 18 probably won't be bought by parents because their Kid plays CoD or BF. If they think that these are 'typical' of 18 games then they will be less concerned by buying games that deserve to be 18 rated.

Anyway, my point is that there should be consistency between all media. That would make it clearer for all as to what to expect - inc Parents who buy games for minors. I do believe though that knowledge of your kids is more important. Everyone matures at different rates and someone who is 17yrs364days is no less mature than they are the next day - just legally old enough to purchase 18 rated content. There are 16yr olds that are more mature and can handle the content better than some 20yr olds though so the age rating is more of a guideline. Of course for shops, they don't know the person and their maturity so have to go on 'age' alone - which is where the Age rating is most important. They can't tell if that 17yr old is mature enough or that 19yr old is not so for shops its a 'legal' get out clause - they can't be accused of selling something to someone if they are old enough - even if they are not mature enough...

A pessimist is just an optimist with experience!

Why can't life be like gaming? Why can't I restart from an earlier checkpoint??

Feel free to add me but please send a message so I know where you know me from...

PSN: TaimeDowne

Jaz007

@BAMozzy The content filters are for more than younger players, I’m an adult, but I still don’t plan on playing a game if it has excessive profanity or something like that. If you read why Gears of War has a filter for gore/swearing, it’s because he says he knows different players have different preferences/ lees on those those things and he has respect for those different players. It’s not just a think of the children thing. It’s just for different preferences. A lot of games have the option to turn blood on and off so it’s basically that expanded.
I don’t like answer “it’s just not meant for you” either, there plenty of games where everything but something like that is for me in the game.

Jaz007

BAMozzy

@Jaz007 Its still for self censorship - whether you do it for streaming, for playing in front of kids or because you don't want to hear/see the swearing/blood gore - kind of like censoring a film for TV broadcasts - that's still very different from the rating of a game and affecting that. The point I was making was from the perspective of 'ratings', kids paying games that are rated above their age and being a parent. Its a separate issue if you, as an adult, want to PG a game for personal reasons for your own gaming. Its nothing new as some games offered the opportunity to turn blood green but that still shouldn't affect the rating or whether kids should be allowed to play these games underage.

A pessimist is just an optimist with experience!

Why can't life be like gaming? Why can't I restart from an earlier checkpoint??

Feel free to add me but please send a message so I know where you know me from...

PSN: TaimeDowne

Rudy_Manchego

@BAMozzy I agree in consistency across all ratings for games.

I think ratings and so in games is a big deal and I feel for parents (like myself) who have to police this kind of thing. It really isn't the same as the early nineties hysteria - a bit of blood or gore or some adult scenes etc. in games. These, I think, can be done via ratings and logic/better education. It is more that technology is moving very quickly and I think it is a struggle to keep up. I bought my young daughter Sing Star Celebrations for her birthday recently (why on earth I did this, I have no freaking idea). As it is on the Playstation, I set it all up. As you go through the process, be default you are set up to share your videos and performances online, you have to opt out as opposed to in. You can opt in with one click of a button. You can also post online really easily and make in game purchases. Now, I'm obviously interested in this kind of thing so got the setup but you would be surprised how many parents probably wouldn't understand these things. So I think education and tools for parents to manage is a good thing.

I don't subscribe to the, parents should do better and it is their fault. That is like saying it is your fault if you get mugged because you have nice clothes. It's not your fault, it is the fault of the person that preys on you. I feel the same and I feel publishers and manufacturers, who profit from predatory behaviour, need to make things as transparent as possible.

Now I may be an idiot, but there's one thing I am not sir, and that sir, is an idiot

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LieutenantFatman

@Welkin96
Yes, my wife was quite dissapointed with the end of Persona 5. Some small spoilers ahead. She was very much enjoying the story with me. All was a nice change with a personal story and bringing people to justice, helping people come to terms with their past, etc.

Then at the very last second it turned into a generic, 'Save the world,' job that went completely over the top. Saving the country from corruption was a fun overarching plot but when it was dropped near the end in favour of the usual overused save the universe silliness, it was a shame and seemed to be a wasted opportunity to us. I felt like it had some real potential to be one of the best game plots out there.

LieutenantFatman

Gremio108

This is a very dangerous thread! Most of mine have already been said. Enjoying the love for Sleeping Dogs.

I've never got on with 3D Mario. Granted the last one I played was Super Mario Galaxy, but I've just never enjoyed them. Given the popularity of 3D Mario games though, it seems like this is my problem rather than Mario's, so he can probably relax.

Also, I don't think Lara Croft did anything for female characters in games, and in fact held them back for many years. Only now with the likes of Aloy are we seeing female characters done right, in games that are considered AAA.

Good job, Parappa. You can go on to the next stage now.

PSN: Hallodandy

LuckyLand

I would like most of the games to stick to something like high-end Gamecube graphical standards.
Today there are huge amounts of games that falls into two distinct categories: indie games with ugly 8 bit graphics (I love pixel art but I don't accept anything less good than 16 bit quality) that can be great games but often are painful to look at, and games with graphics so detailed, polished and pushed to the limits that it is often not really sustainable by developers, so either they risk to go bankrupt if their game don't become the absolute best selling out there or they fill the game with loot boxes and other odious means to drain more money from players. Developing times also becomes too long and the quantity of games become smaller. There are not many good games that you can choose, there are only a few absolutely greatest games that either you like or you are screwed because you have no other choice.
I like good graphics but I really feel like pushing this thing so much is not good for the bigger picture. And on the other hand many indie and/or low budget games looks really too bad, so much bad that I can't enjoy them even if they are great in other ways. I really feel like developers, and the gaming world as a whole, has completely lost any healthy sense of proportion and I fear that things will get even worse.

I used to be a ripple user like you, then I took The Arrow in the knee

KALofKRYPTON

@Rudy_Manchego Couldn't disagree more. Parents should do better and monitor what their kids are playing and watching. Most just don't care to or are too weak to deny their child whatever they want.

My girl is 11; as a good couple of examples - I'd say that 70% of the kids her age in her classes have seen the first Deadpool movie, many are already playing Fortnite. While I think she could probably cope with it just fine, I find both inappropriate for consumption - so she doesn't get to see/play them.

Parents shouldn't need 'educating' - they should have the wherewithal and interest to seek information on what their children are engaging in; and none of the set up stuff is actually difficult to understand - certainly no more than setting up their phone or strolling through settings on Facebook and the like.

Too many are happy to shirk responsibility as if they have no agency in their child's experiences.

While I agree that transparency is important - wilful ignorance on the part of some parents is also just as significant.

Sorry if that's a bit ranty, but I'm in an office at the moment listening to indignant nonsense as someone's just had a "...my 12 year old spent £700 on Fortnite..." story pop us on their phone - as if it's anything other than a case of the parent being a fool and the child being a thief.

PSN: KALofKRYPTON (so you can see how often I don't play anything!)

Twitter: @KALofKRYPTON (at your own risk, I don't care if you're offended)

"Fate: Protects fools, little children, and ships named Enterprise." - Cmdr William T. Riker

BAMozzy

@Rudy_Manchego It should be a big thing and not 'questionable' across media either. I do think that to a degree, slapping an 18 certificate on a game almost makes it 'better' where as with movies, if you can knock it down to a 15, you will get better box office. It comes, I think, from those games that achieve notoriety like Mortal Kombat and GTA.

I do think Publishers/Devs have to take a lot more responsibility too. Especially with games aimed at younger or family games to protect them online and with additional purchases - turned off completely for those accounts that are say 12 for example and under, and off by default with the option to turn on for those over that age. Adult games are perhaps less exempt as the Adults 'Should' know better but even then, I do think they need to be more transparent. It may have some indication of these elements but these are often in the (very) small print on the back.

Certain standards though should be consistent across media. Violence is a difficult one as you can have people being shot in a PG (look at Star Wars or some of the War movies) so doesn't necessarily mean its a 15 - Jurassic Park had someone eaten alive and that was only a 12. Bad language seems to have different levels too - not all 'bad' words are equal and context in which they are used to makes a big difference - as does region. Take the word for a female dog that in context is perfectly fine but can be used both negatively and positively in other context and then there is a slang word for cigarette in the UK that has a much more negative meaning in the US (obviously I won't write that here). There is the F-word that is not always 'bad' (not necessarily good/acceptable in polite company or around young children) but generally it warrants a 15 rating - until you go all Samuel L Jackson and put Mother in front and then its an 18. I could go on but the point is language too isn't simple. Nudity - as long as its not genitalia warrants a 15 and sex too can be a 15 in certain scenarios and depending on how much is shown but it seems more defined and easier to categorise. However, these standards - however they are defined and contribute to age ratings, should apply across all media. If you can watch something with some 'nudity, sex, violence, horror and hear quite a bit of profanity in a 15 rated film, then I really don't understand why these end up as an 18 in gaming. Not only would that uniformity be fair across media, parents can use that as a guideline for gaming purchases too.

I do think that games that younger people can play need more information for parents. I don't think its as important for games aimed at adults or even 'young' adults (15+) as they should have more responsibility for their actions and awareness of online, money etc. I don't think it needs more than a mention - especially if legislation comes in surrounding 'loot boxes' and gambling - again that can be used as an extra criteria in the ratings system - any RNG micro-transaction is considered as 'gambling' and automatically rated as 18. If that affects their sales in areas where gambling is banned, so be it - maybe that will stop it entirely!

A pessimist is just an optimist with experience!

Why can't life be like gaming? Why can't I restart from an earlier checkpoint??

Feel free to add me but please send a message so I know where you know me from...

PSN: TaimeDowne

Rudy_Manchego

@KALofKRYPTON I'll agree with you that parental responsibility is always important. Going back to my own youth, there was always those kids whose parents let them do anything and didn't set boundaries etc. then wondered why they went off the rails or didn't behave. Can't disagree that parents need to take an interest in what their children are doing. Clearly 11 year olds shouldn't be watching Deadpool.

I think the Deadpool example is actually a good one. You might not have seen Deadpool but reading the back of a DVD, watching a quick trailer tells you that there are bad things. LIterally just looking at the front of the cover tells you it is a 15 (in the UK).

Games are no longer that simple and if you aren't into gaming, then understanding what is in a game isn't as simple. Sure there is the ESRB or Pegi rating and that relates to content. It doesn't relate though to online components, what users can share, what others can see, what can be bought etc.

I know a few people who have no idea about gaming - they bought consoles or tablets etc. because it was the must have gift. They want their kids to be safe but they have found it hard seeing what they need to protect against. In my example, on Singstar, I had to opt out of sharing personal videos and I had to go into settings etc. Nowhere on the box did it tell me that it would do this, nor did it make it clear that my kid could literally click on a song and buy it. The UI is purposefully designed to make you do this so more revenue can be earned. Now is it my responsibility to check what my kid is doing? Absolutely, you are totally right. That said, if it isn't made obvious to parents (in the same way that seeing a DVD cover that tells me I need to check before showing to someone underage) then it can be harder to enforce it. I feel that games should advertise what online components are used, what can or needs to be purchased, and what form of monetisation this uses. That's my point - I don't feel that many game companies are that transparent.

Also, kids are devious little beggars, I remember going to great lengths to record Pulp Fiction behind my parents back from Sky back in the day.

Now I may be an idiot, but there's one thing I am not sir, and that sir, is an idiot

https://jambags.co.uk

PSN: Rudy_Manchego | Twitter:

LieutenantFatman

@Welkin96
Sadly, not yet. I have told her the plot for Persona 4 is a lot more interesting, will definitely replay it with her if it ever gets a remaster. As fun as 5 was, guessing who the villain is was far too easy by comparison.

LieutenantFatman

roe

Might be a controversial opinion itself but I honestly couldn't care less about game ratings and things like that. I get why they're there, but parenting is a lot more than just controlling what your kids watch/play imo.

I grew up playing the likes of Mortal Kombat, Street Fighter and GTA when I legally shouldn't have, and never had a problem with it.

roe

KALofKRYPTON

@Rudy_Manchego
I would argue that it's disingenuous on the part of many parents to claim to be oblivious to what modern gaming entails. I'm 36, and have plenty of friends who had children before I did. I would very much place myself in a generation of gamers. While everyone may not have played, we've seen the most radical advances in technology ever witnessed - and with that the impact on everyday life. So those who claim ignorance of what their kids games are doing - while tapping away at CandyCrush, and FaceBook etc really must be living under rocks.
And even in the event that they don't know - why? Why don't they know? It's certainly not hard to find out...anything at all really.

It's toxic cultural development. Many parents are ready to abdicate their role. So long as someone else is to blame should something go wrong.

Kids are devious - I had a pretty free reign as a kid, but I was well aware of where my boundaries were. I mean, think of that Fortnite example - Can you imagine lifting £700 from your parents wallets when you were a kid? Me neither.

But that kid went right on buying on his old man's card. It wasn't vague - there's no ambiguity. But it comes to a head with the dad blaming the bank, then Fortnite - anyone but the thieving kid.

PSN: KALofKRYPTON (so you can see how often I don't play anything!)

Twitter: @KALofKRYPTON (at your own risk, I don't care if you're offended)

"Fate: Protects fools, little children, and ships named Enterprise." - Cmdr William T. Riker

KALofKRYPTON

@roe
ratings are important. A parent's knowledge of their child is anther. Also, they type of content is significant.

The controversial Mortal Kombat of the 90s drew headlines for it's depiction of violence. Of course we all played it as kids anyway.
Compare that to the newest trailer for The Last Of Us, broadcast and streamed and advertised by PlayStation from the biggest game show in the world.

There is no comparison.

PSN: KALofKRYPTON (so you can see how often I don't play anything!)

Twitter: @KALofKRYPTON (at your own risk, I don't care if you're offended)

"Fate: Protects fools, little children, and ships named Enterprise." - Cmdr William T. Riker

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