“I think [Motion Scan is] an interesting solution to a problem for now. But it’s also an interesting dead end,” the visionary head told CVG.

“That’s exactly what I feel. Their technique is incredibly expensive and they will never be able to shoot body and face at the same time.”

To be fair to Cage, the disjointed method Team Bondi using to connect body to head is our biggest concern with the otherwise phenomenal looking L.A. Noire.

“We see a huge difference between shooting the face and body separately and shooting everything at the same time. Suddenly you’ve got a real sense of acting that is consistent. You can’t imagine how related what you say with your face is to what your body does,” he said.

“[MotionScan] will never be able to do that."

Cage added that Motion Scan does not allow for real-time lighting, and makes it impossible to reposition eyes to ensure a character is looking in the right direction.

“I think L.A Noire looks good – honestly, it does – but I don’t think they’ll go much further than where they are.

“With the technology we use, we can improve; there is a lot of room for improvement and we hope to show very soon where we are now.”

The crux to Cage's comments culminated in the director stating that the team had made "significant progress" since Heavy Rain, and that he expects to match Avatar [the movie] over the next few years. Lofty claims, Cage. We're looking forward to see what you have to show us.