With content droughts always a concern shortly after the release of a brand new system, we predicted earlier in the year that 2014 would play host to a slew of PlayStation 3 re-releases. While this hasn’t quite played out just yet – with Tomb Raider: Definitive Edition and Dead Nation: Apocalypse Edition being the most noticeable upgrades – there are hints that a number of publishers are working on PlayStation 4 ports. For example, Sony hasn’t officially unveiled it yet, but it’s clear that Naughty Dog’s survival horror opus The Last of Us is on its way, while Metro: Redux was recently confirmed for the console as well. With these repurposed products certain to become even more common over the coming months, we’ve pulled a chunk of our team together to talk about the titles that we’d like to see re-mastered for the Japanese giant’s latest super machine.

Bayonetta

Nathan Michalik: Plagued with problems at launch, Bayonetta was an insanely good game that was held back by development issues with the PS3 hardware. Fortunately, the improved capabilities and more streamlined architecture of Sony’s next-gen system would fit the madness of Platinum Games’ character action excursion like a catsuit made of human hair, so I’d love to see this classic make a comeback on the PS4.

Beyond: Two Souls

Sammy Barker: It may have been the gaming equivalent of yeast extract on toast, but I really enjoyed David Cage’s emotional rollercoaster. Granted, the title tried to tackle too many genres at once – hopping between horror, sci-fi, and even bad romantic comedy – but in spite of the mixed script, the Hollywood cast really succeeded in bringing this ghoulish tale to life. The release already looked great on the PS3, of course, but it could come close to photorealism on Sony’s next-gen machine. More than anything, though, I just really want an excuse to play this again, because I’ll forever regret not kicking that British partygoer into touch if I don’t.

Dark Souls

Alex Stinton: My number one candidate for a PS4 definitive edition is Dark Souls. An unstable framerate – especially in the infamous Blighttown area – and muddy textures didn’t exactly detract from this tough role-playing game when it was originally released, but the thought of a better looking and smoother version is something that I’d snap up in an instant. Who knows, maybe even developer From Software could incorporate the full lighting model which failed to make it into the sequel.

God of War III

Brett Young: One game that I think could benefit immensely from the PS4 treatment is God of War III. While it looked stunning to start with, a next-gen port would look absolutely phenomenal. Moreover, the previous entries in the series made the jump to the PS3, so what’s stopping this one from putting in an appearance on Sony’s latest super machine? That opening boss fight is an experience that I’d happily pay to revisit.

inFAMOUS

Joey Thurmond: inFAMOUS: Second Son is, without a doubt, one of the most graphically beautiful titles that’s ever graced a console. However, its recent release has prompted me to think back to the first game, and – while impressive for its time – how it suffered from texture pop-ins, awkward animations, and a muted colour palette consisting of way more than fifty shades of grey. With the PS4, all of these flaws could be improved, allowing newcomers to enjoy the franchise’s origins without having to slug through the original release’s putrid presentation. Throw in control refinements, touchpad integration, and new voice acting from Eric Ladin, and this could be a great port.

Journey

Kell Andersen: Journey is a gorgeous game – on this we can all agree. So gorgeous, in fact, that it may seem like a waste of time and energy attempting to make it any more pretty on the PS4. Alas, after seeing Flower on the next-gen machine, I can't help but wonder what thatgamecompany's meditative masterpiece would look like on new hardware. And if nothing else, it would hold us over until the inevitable sequel: Journey 2: The Reckoning.

Just Cause 2

Simon Fitzgerald: The one title that I would like to see on the PS4 is Just Cause 2. I loved this game so much; with its free roaming traversal and explosive gameplay, I just couldn’t put it down. A re-release would really benefit from upgraded visuals and the added features of the DualShock 4, and I wouldn’t say no to some additional content – perhaps a new area or even that multiplayer mod that’s proving popular on the PC. Either way, this was a great adventure on the PS3, so why not make it even better?

Mass Effect Trilogy

Robert Ramsey: For me, there's only one series that needs to be reborn on the PS4, and that's Mass Effect. Luckily, with the franchise's fourth instalment expected to land within the next couple of years, the thought of seeing Commander Shepard's story put in an appearance on Sony's next-gen machine may not be too unbelievable. The trilogy was enthralling on the PS3, despite the fact that we had to wait several years for the first game, but with the PS4's technical prowess backing it, the sci-fi-'em-up could far surpass its original console incarnation due to a much more stable framerate and far fewer glitchy moments.

Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance

Edwin Garcia: Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance has to have one of the crazier names in recent memory – and that nonsense is only matched by its gameplay. Still, considering its parent property’s pedigree, this wasn’t quite the looker that franchise fans may have expected, but the power of the PS4 could put paid to any complaints about its presentation. Toss in the DLC starring robotic dogs and this could be a really great package – especially seeing as a fair few missed out on the madness first time around.

Ni No Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch

Katy Ellis: For me, there’s one game in particular that’s crying out for a PS4 makeover, and that’s Studio Ghibli and Level-5’s magical Ni No Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch. A game so rich in colour, depth, and detail would look truly divine on Sony’s latest system, and would give gamers another opportunity to enjoy a release which sincerely deserved all of the acclaim that it received back in February of last year. I can only imagine how crisp the lights of the Fairyground market would look on next-gen hardware, and I’m practically drooling at the prospect of flying with Tengri across the world map with a DualShock 4 in hand. If nothing else, though, the PS4 could do with a few JRPGs.

Tales of Xillia

Nicola Hayden: I believe that Tales of Xillia and its direct sequel Tales of Xillia 2 should receive a PS4 makeover. Alright, the latter’s not been localised yet, but the twosome are widely regarded as the franchise’s crème-de-la-crème, and would undoubtedly take great advantage of the system’s upgraded visuals. Improvements to the locales, character animations, and cut-scenes would help to draw you even deeper into the narrative and gameplay, while a second shot at stardom should hopefully ensure that these classics aren’t forgotten in the sands of time.

The Unfinished Swan

Graham Banas: The Unfinished Swan is my favourite game ever, so I’d love for it to find a way onto Sony’s latest system. I think that the interesting visual approach combined with an increase in the draw distance would make this adventure even more of a sight to behold. I know, it already looks outstanding, but there were a few technical niggles with the original that the power of the PS4 could easily clear up. And if nothing else, I just really like tossing paint.


Are there any titles in particular that you’d like to see upgraded for Sony’s next-gen system? Do you wish that publishers would focus on new PS4 titles, rather than ports? Spruce yourself up in the comments section below.

Which of these PS3 titles would you most like to play on PS4? (83 votes)

Bayonetta

8%

Beyond: Two Souls

7%

Dark Souls

7%

God of War III

12%

inFAMOUS

10%

Journey

5%

Just Cause 2

6%

Mass Effect Trilogy

20%

Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance

6%

Ni No Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch

13%

Tales of Xillia

2%

The Unfinished Swan

2%

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