Packed with stunning camera work and tons of tension, the gameplay slice showed a real white-knuckle ride as Lara desperately tried to escape from a hazardous underground cave.

But the demo wasn't faultless, and it did leave some people a little concerned. For example, the game relied heavily on the use of QTEs, a gameplay mechanism that's not necessarily everyone's cup of tea. Speaking in defence of the game, CD's Noah Hughes told Gamespot that Tomb Raider's QTEs aren't the game's "primary tool".

"Quick-time sequences is something we will leverage in the game," Hughes said[url=http://uk.gamespot.com/xbox360/action/tomb-raider-2012/video/6326235/tomb-raider-interview-with-noah-hughes][/url].

"One of the things which is absolutely important to us is to deliver an intense and cinematic experience. At very specific times, we feel we can do that best – while still delivering challenging gameplay – in a quick-time type event.

"Having said that, it really isn't the primary tool we use to deliver drama in the game."

Crystal Dynamics aims to introduce emotional impact in different ways.

"The idea of camera during normal gameplay experiences, and the animation systems and the audio and the big events in the world, these are all things that will deliver emotional impact in a different way."