Forums

Topic: Games you've recently beat

Posts 1,481 to 1,500 of 1,521

Kidfried

Just finished the Spectre Knight DLC for Shovel Knight. Maybe the most brilliant one of 'em all. Can't wait until they finally release the King DLC now.

And with that and Red Dead done, I can fully focus on... Assassin's Creed Origins.

Kidfried

Kidfried

@Th3solution I will definitely go back to the RDR2 topic, to read on that. Always fun digging up these impressions.

I loved the epilogue story in its own way. Just didn't felt like the right note to end the characters with, I guess. But I'll report back one I have read the RDR2 thread.

And I'm really impressed with how well you know my backlog. Those were exactly the big ones I was deciding between.

I heard a lot about Origins already, and how it differs from previous entries. I'm prepared to be overwhelmed by the amount of content. You'll probably never see me again.

Kidfried

Tasuki

Finished Contra (NES) on the Contra Collection last night. Of course I used the 30 man code but I just wanted to do a quick run.

Push Square Moderator and all around retro gamer.

My Backlog

PSN: Tasuki3711

Ralizah

@Kidfried Oh? Is there a significant chunk of gameplay between RDR2's climax and the end of the epilogue?

Ralizah

PSN: Ralizah

Kidfried

@Ralizah Yes, I feel like the developers put it in there to add some context to the post-game stuff. It's a nice idea, and provides some fan service for those who stuck around until the end, which is nice on one hand, but, like everything in Red Dead Redemption 2, it's massive, while the plot just isn't nowhere near as strong as the main game.

Let's just say, it left me confused.

The main game's story, though, unparalleled.

Kidfried

Ralizah

@Kidfried It sounds like the game is one big rebellion against the idea of less being more.

I do intend to get around to it someday, but I'll confess, hearing about the terrible controls and weighty movement really put me off of it. I like my video game movements to be snappy.

Ralizah

PSN: Ralizah

mookysam

Guacamelee 2 - I loved the first one - which I replayed last summer - so very much looked forward to playing this. Like the first game it is a Metroidvania luchador inspired beat-em-up and plays extremely similarly, even retaining the same moves (which are gradually unlocked as you progress through the game).

Despite the familiarity there are a lot of new ideas and the gameplay is considerably more complex - particularly in its often elaborate level design. At times I thought "wow this is clever", but others I swore repeatedly at the TV. Some of the platforming sections are difficult if not downright frustrating, giving the impression that the developers assumed players will have completed the first game beforehand. There is quite a lot of satisfaction in eventually completing a difficult section.

The biggest criticism I have is that controls are a little slow, with a slight delay when using certain moves. In a game that often requires moves to be used in quick succession, it's something that could be a little tighter.

Aside from level design the area that has seen the most improvement is the "chicken transformation". In the first game it was largely a gag and used to move through small paths, but here the chicken has its own moveset and is very effective in combat.

Like the first game there are a lot of "optional" rooms and areas where after completing a particularly difficult platforming challenge you are rewarded with a prize (typically coins, heart or stamina pieces). One late game "chicken illuminati" dungeon is perhaps the most difficult platforming I have ever done in any game.

On the subject of chicken illuminati (yes, a chicken cult), the game has a rather offbeat script that is infused quite a lot of humour.
The game has a pleasing visual style that has been embellished since its predecessor. The vast majority of the music is the same as the first game, however, which I found a little disappointing.

Overall, despite its often high difficulty I enjoyed Guacamelee 2 a lot.

mookysam

PSN: mookysam

Kidfried

@Ralizah The controls and the game's length, make it impossible for me to recommend it to anyone without hesitation.

I'm now playing Assassin's Creed Origins, and it's so satisfying in contrast. Within just a few minutes I experienced a level of being comfortable with its controls, something I hardly ever had in Red Dead.

But those things have been well documented already of course. Still a very extraordinary game regardless.

Kidfried

Kidfried

@mookysam So uh, you mentioned a delay on the controls. I remember the fighting in the first one also had that a bit. Is it worse now in this game, or largely the same?

Kidfried

mookysam

@Kidfried It's about the same, though I thought dodging was slightly off at times - particularly with enemy projectiles. However, because many of the platforming sections are a lot more intricate - requiring lots of different moves to be used in quick succession - the slight delay is sometimes more of an issue there.

mookysam

PSN: mookysam

RogerRoger

How bad does a console port need to be when it doesn't even bother to include the CGI story cutscenes that are supposed to be shown between missions?

Turns out, very bad indeed. And that's Splinter Cell: Double Agent on PS3 all over.

After writing about my initial disappointment earlier in the week, I soldiered on and completed it, post-credits epilogue mission and all. A big part of me wishes I hadn't. This single, poorly-optimised mess of a game has taken all of the goodwill I have towards the Splinter Cell series and dragged it into the shadows, knife at throat. I'm not even sure I'd want the franchise to return, and my disappointment at E3's silence on the Sam Fisher front has kinda been replaced by relief... because whilst great Splinter Cell is indeed great, I don't think my love of the franchise could take another average-to-bad hit like this.

To the credit of Double Agent, the fresh ideas kinda held firm throughout. There were good, solid decisions to be made, right up to the end. Stripping away the story meant that some of them had zero context; for example, I had absolutely no qualms about setting up one of the terrorists to take the blame (and subsequently a bullet to the head) for my duplicity, only to discover she was supposed to be Sam's major love interest. Not that I'd have made a different decision (it was tactically the best outcome), but it would've made me stop and think for a moment, and given the betrayal more weight and context for Sam. Then again, I didn't even know why Sam was on a self-destructive undercover assignment to begin with, because the game neglected to show me the important post-prologue cutscene where his daughter is killed in a hit-and-run. I only discovered this last night, by complete chance, whilst browsing around on YouTube. As a result, I feel like I've read a novel in German; sure, I was able to pick up a few key words, but I couldn't accurately describe the plot to you.

What's worse is that none of this moral hand-wringing had any payoff. There's a frustrating anticlimax to the final couple missions, the most generic of the lot, before the screen goes black and says "TO BE CONTINUED..." and I just found myself saying "So what?" out loud to nobody in particular.

The screen goes black a lot, by the way. There's no escaping the mid-level checkpoints, as they intrusively crush any possible sense of immersion and give you nothing to look at but a spinning wheel and the word "CHECKPOINT" in big green letters. To be fair, breaking immersion isn't gonna be a primary concern anyway, not when the framerate is practically set to "PowerPoint slideshow" for almost all of the game. Busy external environments you kinda expect, and there are some particularly chaotic areas later in the game, but even the most grey-brown of corridors stutter and stall. Add to this an antiquated control scheme which sees you wrestling with your DualShock to perform the simplest of tasks, and there's little satisfaction to be had when you eventually do manage to pull off something stealthy and smooth... it's more a sense of relief than anything. "Thank goodness; now I can make a save so that I never have to do that again." Not a happy feeling to have about a game at all.

In fairness, some levels were pretty neat. Highlights included a Shanghai skyscraper, down which Sam had to rappel, dodging helicopters and open windows alike as fireworks erupted over a detailed cityscape. It was very atmospheric and came at a point where the short, simplistic level design had started to allow for the gameplay to gel. I didn't have to restart a checkpoint or manual save more than once or twice (whereas in other levels, it was a frustrating exercise in patience and perseverance to overcome the finickity enemy A.I. and muddy, inconsistent geometry). There was also a cruise ship which was quite impressive, if it weren't for the fact that its sheer scale made it one of the worst-performing environments from a technical standpoint.

But, aside from the terrorist headquarters rest-stops, it's all really linear. There aren't any levels which give you, say, an embassy or office building and challenge you to find a way through. There's often only one route to your objective, with maybe some side rooms you can poke your nose in for extra credit. I feel like I've seen every single corner of every single environment rendered, whereas I know there's dozens of places I never even had to enter in the previous three games, but could if I wanted to. I don't mind scripted, cinematic gameplay in the slightest, but Double Agent seems to be constantly wrestling with itself, whether to be open-ended stealth or tightly-controlled adventure (perhaps fitting for the premise, if not frustrating for the player). There's nothing here to match the quality of the series' best, such as the train from Pandora Tomorrow, and that's a real shame.

All this aside, and my faith in the franchise shaken, I'm still determined to play a half-decent spy thriller. So, up next? The controversial Splinter Cell: Blacklist. Despite my fears, I'm looking forward to it, because I've seen some gameplay before and it at least looks playable (even without Michael Ironside behind the goggles).

Heck, after Double Agent, it's gonna feel practically current-gen by comparison. Don't be concerned; this isn't some tirade against older, less-intuitive games.

Even at launch, this game should've gone dark and stayed dark. Mission failed.

PSN ID: GDS_2421
Making It So Since 1987

Th3solution

@RogerRoger Have I mentioned I thoroughly enjoy reading your game impressions when the game is bad. 😂 Great stuff!

The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

RogerRoger

@Th3solution Thanks. I'm quietly proud of what I wrote the other day, in the "What (Non-PS4) game are you playing??" topic, when I said that trying to steer Sam around "has felt like trying to steer a milk float with burst tyres. Whilst wearing oven gloves. On the Moon."

Not sure I was able to best that quote here, but it was fun to try.

PSN ID: GDS_2421
Making It So Since 1987

KALofKRYPTON

@RogerRoger Wow!

I only ever played the first one on the OG XBOX - enjoyed it, but just didn't bother with the series afterwards.

PSN: KALofKRYPTON (so you can see how often I don't play anything!)

Twitter: @KALofKRYPTON (at your own risk, I don't care if you're offended)

"Fate: Protects fools, little children, and ships named Enterprise." - Cmdr William T. Riker

Th3solution

@RogerRoger Lol, awesome. And I should amend my statement. I enjoy reading all your game impressions, not just the bad ones. But the descriptions and analogies like steering a milk float are especially humorous and insightful. 😛

The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

Kidfried

Even with all the context at your disposal and a more recent frame rate (I played it on 360), I can assure you, it wouldn't have made the game fun.

I can appreciate certain ideas in the game, but none of them resulted in a fun experience unfortunately.

Just replay Pandora Tomorrow and Chaos Theory, is the best advice!

Kidfried

Ralizah

@RogerRoger Jesus christ, that sounds awful.

Great write-up, though. Just add a little more mean-spiritedness to your reviews and you could be the 'Roger Ebert of bad video games.'

Edited on by Ralizah

Ralizah

PSN: Ralizah

RogerRoger

Thanks to all who responded to my write-up / angry rant yesterday!

@KALofKRYPTON Now that I've calmed down a little, I can genuinely recommend Pandora Tomorrow and Chaos Theory as excellent stealth games. The remastered HD Trilogy on PS3 is a worthy purchase, especially if you can find it for twenty quid someplace. Just... yeah, as it stands, don't bother going beyond those first three games (this coming from me, the sworn defender of mediocrity).

@Kidfried I got that distinct impression. I won't bother seeking a more stable / complete copy in future. The overall design and implementation was just lacking, even in a non-technical sense. It was as though a couple artistic directors had a meeting, threw a bunch of cool ideas up on a flipchart, and then went on a really long lunch, leaving the work experience kids to scramble around and figure everything out as best they could before home time. I'm actually thinking of going back and reminding myself of why I love Splinter Cell, before continuing forward, so good advice! Cheers!

@Th3solution @Ralizah As somebody who prides himself on being "the nice guy" all the time, defending underdogs wherever possible, there is something rather cathartic about allowing myself to be cruel towards something. I'm just glad I haven't reached the scathing wickedness of Roger Ebert... yet!

PSN ID: GDS_2421
Making It So Since 1987

Top

Please login or sign up to reply to this topic