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Topic: Games you've recently beat

Posts 1,321 to 1,340 of 1,371

Ralizah

@crimsontadpoles The Nov. 20th interrogation with Sae?!

Oh, yeah, wow, you're nowhere close to the end of the game.

For future reference, you pretty much can't not get the true ending if you go back in and make different choices.

Ralizah

PSN: Ralizah

BranJ0

@Ralizah Thanks for the detailed writeup! I found it really interesting since you're one of the first people I've seen who seems to agree with my opinion on the game. I bought Okami HD last summer and being a huge Zelda fan thought I'd adore it, but I just couldn't get into it. The pacing was really weird, the dungeons were painfully linear with all of the puzzle solutions being incredibly easy, the general combat was mindless and, most of all, I despised Issun. The game was charming and gorgeous, but it just wasn't enough to get me through it, so I stopped playing at the point when you go inside the emperor's mouth, which I assume is roughly halfway through the game? I'll probably finish it at some point because I hate leaving games without seeing all they have to offer, but I felt like I'd played enough for me to justifiably feel disappointed, and that the game had been overhyped as "a masterpiece"

BranJ0

Ralizah

@crimsontadpoles To be fair, these games are pretty inordinately long, even by JRPG standards. My first playthrough of Persona 5 took roughly 115 hours to see to completion.

@BranJ0 Yeah, I think the game's reputation skates by so smoothly largely because of the incredible presentation, and because it was the only really Zelda-esque experience on the PS2. I've heard people refer to it as "the best Zelda game" only half-ironically. The thing about traditional Zelda games, though, is that the spectacular dungeons are crucial setpieces and are largely what those games are remembered for. Breath of the Wild was able to get away with sub-par big dungeons both because the majority of the focus was on adventuring outside in the larger, more open world of Hyrule and because there are a ton of mini-dungeons found throughout that feature enemies and puzzles that'd normally be found in larger dungeons anyway (although I actually think the Divine Beasts are still better than the dungeons in this game, because they're still creative and actually designed like big, interconnected puzzles). Okami's overworld segments are designed like those in ordinary Zelda games, though, so it feels like a big part of that equation is missing when the big setpieces are gone or scaled-back to the point where they hardly even stick in the memory.

I'd say you quit a little over halfway through the game. I don't regret beating it, but I do think its reputation is largely undeserved (except, again, for remarks about the presentation).

Edited on by Ralizah

Ralizah

PSN: Ralizah

BranJ0

@Ralizah I would agree with you for the most part that the dungeons are huge setpieces that you mainly remember, but I find it interesting that I adored wind waker, the game with by far the worst and most linear dungeons in zelda history. I can't quite pinpoint what it is about wind waker that makes me love it so much that is missing in Okami.

If I was a bit halfway then I'll probably finish Okami at some point this summer then, if only because having it sat unfinished on my switch dashboard is driving me mad!

BranJ0

Ralizah

@BranJ0 The design of most of Wind Waker's dungeons are still quite a bit better than the majority of dungeons in Okami. Tower of the Gods and the Earth Temple are both pretty good Zelda dungeons, and I quite like the Forsaken Fortress. I can't think of anything similarly strong in Okami HD. There's a dungeon near the end that is... decent. It's almost like a real Zelda dungeon. But it's the only one, and it only sticks out to me because of how much better it is than the dungeons throughout the rest of the game.

Additionally, while both allow you to use tools you've gained to access secrets in the overworld, Wind Waker gives you a seamless, open ocean to explore, whereas Okami is segmented into several distinct zones.

You can explore in Wind Waker without constantly being ripped away to a separate battle screen, like in Okami.

The characters in TWW are fun, charming, and often memorable. Not so in Okami.

Edited on by Ralizah

Ralizah

PSN: Ralizah

BranJ0

@Ralizah Haha, that pinpoints it quite nicely! I actually am not a big fan of the earth temple (mirror is annoying to control and the puzzles for it are very simple, design is quite boring and the boss is pretty uninspired) but I LOVE the wind temple, so that makes up for it. I'll look forward to the one good dungeon in Okami then as well when I finally get round to finishing it off

BranJ0

Tjuz

I started the very first BioShock about a week ago, and finished it today. It definitely is quite a good game. I didn't fall in love with it as many seem to have done, but I can't deny that it kept constantly kept me interested and wanting more. Unfortunately the big twist was already spoiled for me way ahead of time, so that may have eliminated some of the real story impact in my experience. In addition, I did find it hard to really follow the story and lore. This is completely on me, but I'm not someone who is easily invested in storytelling by tapes, which is pretty much what BioShock went for for most of it's run. I'm definitely more of a sit-back-and-relax-while-watching-a-cutscene kind of person. Because of that, I did need to make a big effort to really follow what was going on, and even then I'm not quite sure I've properly understood all the dynamics and character relationships. I still don't know what Diane McClintock's deal is supposed to be, really.

Luckily, a lot of the storytelling was also in it's environments, which to me is really where the game shines. The levels in this game were expertly crafted and filled to the brink with detail. It was a real pleasure to explore every nook and cranny in this world, even if the underlying concept of Rapture itself wasn't all that interesting to me. Fort Frolic was probably my favourite level in the game, thanks to it's great atmosphere and fantastic antagonist. It's a shame he was only in there for one level (and a cameo later on), because he might be my favourite character in the entire game. Everything about him was just so refreshing in a depressing world like Rapture, and the level itself was beautifully decorated with all kinds of fun things.

The Big Daddies were truly terrifying at first, but once I figured out that either using Electric Gel or Exploding Bucks was the most effective tactic, they lost a lot of their tension. I did also run into the extra little sister glitch, where by (accidentally) avoiding scripted little sister/big daddy events you could get an extra one to spawn and possibly break the game. I had this problem the very first instance it could happen (in Neptune's Bounty), and luckily I looked up why I saved 4/3 sisters and found sound advice to avoid doing that afterwards. Apparently the game will let you have 1 extra sister, but any more and you automatically receive the bad ending. That would've put a real tamper on the entire experience had it happened.

The combat in this case is truly satisfying. I'm not one for experimenting with combat systems in games, and the same happened here. What you give me at the start, I'll use for the entire game. The wrench as well as electric shock is what I used to kill every enemy except Big Daddies, because that would've been an impossible task in their case. Stunning and hitting splicers with a wrench never got old, and I'm sure I there's a lot more fun combinations like that if I had experimented more. Arkham-style combat is usually my favourite (and frankly, the only kind of combat I really enjoy), but this was very well executed.

Overall, I did enjoy BioShock (or I wouldn't have gotten anywhere close to finishing it), but it didn't quite live up to the hype for me. Constantly good, with shades of greatness. I did already start BioShock 2 this evening, and played through the first level. I did prefer the introduction of 2 to 1's introduction, so maybe the second one will end up being somewhat more up my alley. I do enjoy the thought of playing as a Big Daddy, even though the Big Sisters are already annoying the hell out of me. The entire concept of Big Sisters feels cheap and like they were simply trying to get a new enemy on the level of Big Daddies in the laziest way possible, but maybe I'll be proven wrong later on. Being closer to the Little Sisters might help me become more emotionally invested in the second one, which is a component I was missing to the first one. I never felt challenged emotionally by the first one whatsoever, except for the one time you had to escort a Little Sister. I suppose I'll see!

Edited on by Tasuki

Tjuz

Tasuki

Ok guys I had to go through and delete a few posts here. Keep in mind when posting in this thread

Stay clear of posting a review and rating games (1 out of 10 that sort of thing) which is against the rules here if your post comes off as a review I will edit/delete it.

Unfortunately users reviews aren't allowed here and is considered spam. Please post a few sentences even a paragraph is ok on your impression of the game and leave it at that. Please do not post a score or anything like that just your thoughts

If this just becomes a user review posting thread then I will have no choice but to lock this thread.

Thanks for understanding

Push Square Moderator and all around retro gamer.

My Backlog

PSN: Tasuki3711

Gremio108

Nioh.

What an ordeal. Great game, it's very nearly up there with the Soulsborne games for me. The only thing holding it back really is the repetitive enemy design. You're basically fighting the same enemies all the way through the game. The standard enemies I mean - the boss designs are exceptional across the board. I can't remember a bad one. Great game. I'm glad it's over.

No way I'm going for the platinum, kudos to anyone who has it.

Good job, Parappa. You can go on to the next stage now.

PSN: Hallodandy

Thrillho

@Gremio108 That was pretty much how I felt too. Damn those skull-wheel enemies to hell! Like you say, boss fights were generally great though.

The use of main mission maps for side missions could be a tad repetitive too.

Edited on by Thrillho

Thrillho

Gremio108

@Thrillho I must admit I started letting the side missions slide a bit towards the end. And yeah those skeleton wheels are real prats. Just as bad as the ones in Dark Souls. I'm yet to see a skeleton wheel enemy in a game that isn't annoying. Skeleton wheels must be pretty angry with how they've been represented in gaming up to this point.

Good job, Parappa. You can go on to the next stage now.

PSN: Hallodandy

Kidfried

@Gremio108 @Thrillho Cheers to you both, as I have just started this game. I'm only in the third main mission now, so haven't encountered any wheels yet!

Decided to gift myself that game for beating Virtues Last Reward, which was quite an investment. It took me over 30 hours to get all the different endings, woah.

I liked the game, although I felt that 999's story tree design was stronger. Some of the endings felt more like ticking boxes than anything.

I loved the approach with regards to the theme of time travel, though. And I generally though the escape room were on par with, if not better than, those in 999.

I also liked how they went overboard with the metaphysics; that became really over the top towards the end, but it served its purpose.

I do feel that the character development wasn't as strong. Sigma was a very well rounded character, and I liked Luna and Phi[/spoiler] too, but a lot of the others never became more to me than their respective roles. [spoiler]Try to name one other trait of Quark besides 'being a kid'. And I also thought Junpei didn't act in line with his personality in 999. I could go on about the characters, but bottom line is I just wished there was a bit more depth to them as persons.

Aside from that and the fact that I wouldn't have minded the game being a bit shorter, I had a jolly good time with the sequel. Now I am standing for my next dilemma.

I am online trophy removed from the platinum in this game, but unfortunately it's a missable one, so I'll have to start over. I want that plat, but I can't say I'm looking forward to it..

Kidfried

Ralizah

@Kidfried Great impressions! Glad to see you finally finished the game.

Kidfried wrote:

Decided to gift myself that game for beating Virtues Last Reward, which was quite an investment. It took me over 30 hours to get all the different endings, woah.

Out of curiousity, did you stop at "END or BEGINNING" (i.e. the canonical true ending to the game), or did you go for the "Another Time" bonus ending as well?

Because, if you didn't go for the bonus ending, I won't discuss it.

Kidfried wrote:

I liked the game, although I felt that 999's story tree design was stronger. Some of the endings felt more like ticking boxes than anything.

A fair criticism, although, given the structure of the game, I'm not sure how it could have been avoided. It is one of my bigger criticisms of the game, though: the initial rush you get when you're first playing the game and are forced to play mind games with other people in the AB Room gives way to "box ticking" as you peck around for other strands to continue unraveling the game's complex knitting.

Given the focus on exploring the consequences of your actions in different timelines, though, I tend to think of it as a sort of spandrel in the game design: a necessary by-product that arises when you combine other aspects of the game together. I can think of ways around this issue, of course, but they all affect the fundamental design and flow of the game itself, so that's no good. A lot of what I love about the game would change in that case. I'd prefer a flawed design that I love to a tighter, less flawed design that isn't as ambitious and engaging.

Although it could be argued that it's not a flaw at all, but a fundamental aspect of the game's evolution as an experience. Consider that Sigma, at the beginning of the game, has no conscious awareness of his deep experience with and connection to morphogenetic tunneling (i.e. the consciousness jumping to different instances of himself in different timelines). The AB game is this intense game of the prisoner's dilemma that he's been forced into, and he doesn't understand the purpose for it or any way to deal with it. Similarly, the player kind of has to blindly make choices about whether to trust or betray the people they've spent time around. In a move that deliberately identifies the player with the character, though, the action of "box ticking" different endings in our universe is the in-game equivalent of Sigma bouncing between timelines, looking for ways to escape his situation. This is addressed explicitly when the game reveals that the timeline manipulation game mechanic is actually a 4D look at what Sigma has actually been experiencing throughout the game. Characters remember things that the player has done previously, further demolishing the barrier between the ludic elements of the game and the experience of the character within the game itself. Granted, other games have satirized, subverted, and or played with the idea of ludonarrative dissonance, but I don't think I've ever played a game that so completely both disintegrated it and made that disintegration an integral part of the game (and experience of the game) itself.

Kidfried wrote:

I loved the approach with regards to the theme of time travel, though. And I generally though the escape room were on par with, if not better than, those in 999.

VLR has the best escape room design in the series, imo. There's more of them, and they're often a good deal more elaborate than anything found in 999/ZTD.

Kidfried wrote:

I do feel that the character development wasn't as strong. Sigma was a very well rounded character, and I liked Luna and Phi[/spoiler] too, but a lot of the others never became more to me than their respective roles. [spoiler]Try to name one other trait of Quark besides 'being a kid'. And I also thought Junpei didn't act in line with his personality in 999. I could go on about the characters, but bottom line is I just wished there was a bit more depth to them as persons.

Putting aside the fact that Uchikoshi isn't exactly known for the amazing character writing in his work (they're OK, but I don't think the casts of these games are exactly unforgettable, y'know?), I found some of the characterization choices interesting. Particularly with Sigma, who is... well... an a-hole. He's often rude, selfish, excessively vulgar, and don't even get me started on the times he almost randomly starts sexually harrassing the girls around him. It must be an experience playing the game today in that regard, considering the blatant harrassment made me incredibly uncomfortable even when I was playing it back in 2012. And there was none of the consciousness-raising about how women are treated in the news back then. Feminist talking points weren't nearly as commonplace as they are now. I guess all I'll say in that regard is that, from what I can recall, the other characters usually reacted with anger and/or disgust when he did this (his perviness must have been even creepier for them when you consider what HE ACTUALLY LOOKS LIKE), and the behavior isn't.... unexpected given the fact that he's mentally a late teens/early 20s college bro who was clearly never taught to respect women as people. I can dig a game where the protagonist is an extremely flawed and often unlikeable individual, but, considering the game never really addresses that behavior in a broader way, I do wish it wasn't present in the game. Especially since I could see it turning off a lot of people from what I consider to be an incredible unique and well-crafted experience.

RE: Junpei... considering how much older he is in this game, and how much crazy stuff he's seen, it doesn't surprise me that his behavior is different. Same with Akane. If Junpei's characterization bothered you in this game, though, all I can say is that I'm eager to see how you react to how he is portrayed (in much, much younger form) in Zero Time Dilemma.

Kidfried wrote:

Aside from that and the fact that I wouldn't have minded the game being a bit shorter, I had a jolly good time with the sequel.

The game absolutely has a terminal case of what might be termed "scope sprawl," but that's part of what I loved about it. 999 is a tightly-crafted thriller where the characters hardly ever have room to breathe, so to speak, and the game's focus is primarily on one central mystery. VLR, on the other hand, does an extensive amount of worldbuilding, crafts an intricate metaphysical system around its complex nest of mysteries, and, oftentimes, just slows down to allow the characters to discuss stuff. A game without scope sprawl likely wouldn't feature a scene where a robot with a cockney accent talks at length about Searlian thought experiments about the nature of consciousness, for example.

Kidfried wrote:

I am online trophy removed from the platinum in this game, but unfortunately it's a missable one, so I'll have to start over. I want that plat, but I can't say I'm looking forward to it..

What trophy? VLR doesn't have any missable trophies (how could it?), and online resources are informing me that this is true for the Nonary Games collection as a whole.

Edited on by Ralizah

Ralizah

PSN: Ralizah

Kidfried

@Ralizah Thanks for the reply. Great as always. I'll try to address most of your points.

1. I did all of the extra endings. Though I must say that those extra endings confused the heck out of me. Are they important for the next game, like the ending in 999 was?

2. I totally get the concept of the game is why this game felt a little repetitive and long at some points, and why sometimes it felt like my choices were insignificant, as I would have to make the other choice as well to get all the endings. All the same sometimes it resulted in some truly magical moments too, for instance the first time when you make a different choice in the AB game, but your opponent does as well. You completely share that moment of disbelief with Sigma, which was pretty cool.

I get that it's kind of a trade off too. It often is in game design, that trade off between fun and the pay off. Like now with Nioh too. Some of the game design choices are downright frustrating, but they're there for a reason too. Wouldn't want to have it any other way.

3. I totally should have made my appreciation for the escape room more clear: I love them. Also, love how at the start of every room I would feel some anxiety: will I be able to finish this without a guide, it looks so complex. But I would always be able to manage quite well.

4. I agree that Sigma has some weird lines, and I feel like the game would have been better off without them. Still, I didn't minded it too much, because the woman characters in the game were the best developed characters and the smartest too.

5. I always liked the long winded conversations. The Chinese room stuff, etc cetera. That never felt too long. But the parts where they were exploring all rooms in between AB games, often felt unnessecary. And was pretty repetitive.

6. The trophy I still need is from 999. I know all guides say it's 'not missable' but it actually is. I accidentally got the real ending in 999 after only two or three playthroughs. I never got the worst possible ending. Thing is, I can't get it anymore, because once you have unlocked a certain branch, you can't go down the 'bad' path anymore, unless you replay the game.

So, that's definitely a missable. It feels kinda like a punishment for making the right choices the first time around.

7. Closing comment: I really liked VLR. I sometimes think I might sound too dismissive or negative talking about games here online. That's me being insecure, because I'm not a native English speaker. So, yes, really liked this game.

Kidfried

Ralizah

@Kidfried

Re 1: The hidden ending is never addressed in the sequel. Uchikoshi says this is because the scene was supposed to be an "extra" for the fans who thoroughly completed it, but considering how narratively dense the scene is, that explanation doesn't really fly with me. Considering how... unrealized... ZTD feels compared to previous games in the series, my guess is that he abandoned that narrative thread for some reason..

Re 3: The design of the rooms is interesting, as you have to kind of combine a bunch of smaller problems or puzzles with a larger guiding theme to make them feel integrated. It's like walking a tightrope between Professor Layton and The Witness, so to speak.

Re 5: I have often wondered how many of the hours I spent playing that game were actually consisted of watching a dot slowly move across a map of the facility. There's undoubtedly, you're right, a ton of padding that makes the game feel bulkier than it needs to.

Re 6: Oof! That sucks. If you clear the game data, does the remake give you the option to skip text by default? If you could fast-forward your way through the early parts of the game, it might make obtaining the trophy more bearable.

Reminds me of Odin Sphere: Leifthrasir. I played the heck out of that game and got the majority of the trophies (44/47 non-platinum trophies), but I deleted it without realizing, at the time, that doing so also deletes save data (I played on PS Vita), and I didn't subscribe to PSN at the time. So now I'm blocked out from the platinum because I didn't find one or two recipes and texts.

Hell if I'm going back to it just for trophies, though. I completed it in every sense that actually matters.

Re 7: Nothing wrong with being critical about games. It allows you to accept their flaws while also more fully understanding what they did right.

Also, I know insecurities aren't typically what you would call rational in nature, but you're one of the most articulate people on this forum. I'd NEVER guess English wasn't your first language. It's really impressive how fully you've mastered it (in written form, anyhow).

Edited on by Ralizah

Ralizah

PSN: Ralizah

Kidfried

@Ralizah Re 1: We'll never get another sequel, right?

Re 6: You're totally right that I can skip most of the text. That's a relief indeed. And I will probably get to it, but it's pretty counterintuitive to do something I have no fun in doing, just for the plat.

Oh, that Odin Sphere situation is way worse than mine. You must have put hours and hours into that game to even get those 44 trophies. At least 999 is really short.

And on my English. First, that's very sweet of you to say. It means a lot. Secondly, I learnt a lot from writing in English on this forum.

Kidfried

Ralizah

@Kidfried
That's my understanding. It's a miracle that ZTD was even greenlit, apparently, considering how poorly VLR was received in Japan. When word came out that the third ZE game likely wasn't being made, there was a massive online campaign from Western fans to revive the project, and that seems to have been successful in convincing Spike Chunsoft to allow development to resume. I'm guessing that most of the team behind VLR had moved on to other projects by then, though. There's actual written story content in that game that's relegated to some sub-menu, instead of being actualized in the full game, which points, again, to a rushed development cycle.

Yeah, if trophies aren't hugely important to you, it's probably best to leave it. If you ever get the hankering to play the game again one day, you can get it then, right?

I spent 55+ hours completing that game. So, yeah, it kinda sucks.

Well, the best way to learn almost any craft is to just... do it. Actual experience with writing, or painting, or composing music, or whatever is far more valuable than anything else. I guess posting on a foreign language forum is about as close as you can come to written language immersion!

Ralizah

PSN: Ralizah

mooserocka

i actually have a huge problem with beating games lately. I dunno why ill play get almost near the end and then just stop and play something else. I always say ill come back and finish but i never do. Last one i actually finished is persona 5 : / wow so long ago every rpg since i got to the end ish and just left it .

mooserocka

Tjuz

I finished BioShock 2 yesterday. I quite enjoyed that. I think it was a step up from the first one for the most part. While I can see why people didn't enjoy the story as much as the first, I do appreciate they didn't try to replicate the ''Would You Kindly''-reveal with some knockoff twist. They kept it it's own thing, and added their own stakes. Pretty much the opposite of what they did with Big Sister, which was a completely unnecessary and pointless addition to the franchise. In the penultimate mission, when they throw two of them at you, I was disappointed in how unimaginative they made that fight. It could've been something really special, and instead we just got knockoff Big Daddies. I did appreciate Eleanor ''turning into'' a Big Sister, though. That was very clever, and it was nice to be able to have her in combat from there onwards.

The combat is practically improved in every possible way. I did have a bit of a problem with a big difficulty spike inbetween games, and as someone who is not a fan of being served too big of a challenge, I therefore turned the difficulty down to easy. I probably could've gone back up again later in the game, since it became incredibly easy, but it was fine as it was. I did find that this game encouraged me to use different plasmids and weapons far more than the original. In the original I easily managed to get through it only using Elictricity Bolt and the wrench (imagine my disappointment when I realised the sequel did not have my familiar wrench), but here I pretty much used every plasmid I had equipped in every big fight. The noticeable difference between plasmid levels definitely helped there I think, as well as the new (and improved) research system actively motivating you to be varied in your combat strategy. As someone who usually gets stuck in what they know with combat, it was nice to see a game basically force me to try and use different things, and so I did as a result.

That said, the new enemies in this game (aside from the Big Sister as previously mentioned) weren't very interesting. I feel like there could've been done a lot more with that. Brutes, Alpha Series and Rumblers were fine the first time, but they threw them at you so consistently that the curiosity factor quickly wore off. I would've liked to have seen them come up with something original for some new enemies, or even a new interesting variation on splicers. I believe it was all just the same, including the return of the incredibly annoying Houdini Splicers. Seriously. I hate them.

A huge quality of life improvement to me (which probably helped a lot in me following the story much more closely this time around) was the quietening of the game volume while an audio tape was being played. So many times in the original I ran across audio tapes to listen to and then being quickly attacked afterwards, and because of that not being able to pay attention to the audio tape as it was became unintelligible thanks to all the combat sounds. They made sure that didn't happen this time, and it was very much noticed on my end. I loved hearing all the background lore on the audio tapes about the politics and dynamics in Rapture, as well as slowly hearing the audio tapes catch up to the present and even their referencing Jack from the first game by the end. I made sure to carefully listen to all of them this time around, and it really added an extra layer that I appreciated.

I enjoyed that the morality aspect of the game was expanded upon in this sequel. The choices between sparing and killing three NPC's throughout the game, which in turn also affects the ending along with how you treated the Little Sisters, were great. The last two NPC's gave me a real moral dilemma, but I ended up killing both of them. The first NPC I spared, which luckily spared me from the worse good ending, but she also clearly deserved to be spared. She really didn't do anything wrong, unlike the second NPC. Like I said, I got the best ending possible ending. I looked up the other endings on YouTube too, and they were all interesting. I especially liked seeing the absolute worst ending. They very cleverly used the choices in the game to really shape Eleanor, and I always like a good choice and consequence.

I did like playing as a Big Daddy. It didn't make much of a difference gameplay-wise, outside of your wrench being replaced by the drill (which I grew to love), but the idea of these you being the person in the suit and having this bond with the Little Sisters just really spoke to me. The harvesting sequences weren't all that fun, but just having a Little Sister with me talking about angels and everything was incredibly... cute? The levels also felt a lot more expansive, and I feel like it took me much longer to get through all of them than it took in the first BioShock. Luckily they were all fairly well designed, with enough fun areas to explore. I saw a lot of complaints regarding BioShock 2 were also the freshness of the setting having worn out by the sequel, but as someone who never fully fell in love with Rapture as a setting in the first place that didn't really affect me personally.

The final two missions were definitely the best part of the game. I think the sequence where you play as a Little Sister and see the world through their eyes[/spoiler] might be my favourite part of both games. Possibly only beaten by WYK. It was incredibly menacing and intimidating, but at the same time very serene and calming. Probably exactly what they were going for! I did also enjoy the underwater sequences. They were a nice addition and added some nice sightseeing to the game. The culmination of this entire game was very well done, although it once again lacked a satisfying final battle. The first game had the [spoiler]incredibly easy Fontaine boss fight, and this second game just has a wave battle for a few minutes[/spoiler]. It seems like they're never really going to get a hang on that. One minor inconvenience I experienced with the final two missions however, was my game crashing after having visited the first pediatric ward. I lost about an hour of progress there, and had to redo it all. Luckily I was able to get through it faster this time around now that I already explored everything, but it was still an annoying added chore. Finally, [spoiler]it seemed a bit cheap the way they got rid of Sinclair. He was a very interesting character to me all game long, having clearly done some very bad things in his past, but that being balanced with his unconditional helping of you throughout the game. To simply throw him at you as an enemy thanks to Lamb turning him into a Big Daddy felt like a very unsatisfying end to his story, and not very well thought out. I was hoping they'd do something more interesting with him, but at least they didn't copy the first BioShock and go the Atlas route.

So, overall, I quite enjoyed BioShock 2. I don't think this is a franchise I'm ever going to truly love, but it keeps me engaged and wanting more. I'd say the sequel is about an 8/10. Slightly better than the original, but nothing that really amazed me in the broad sense. I'll have to see what I'm going to follow this up with. I have a few games lying in my backlog (Yakuza 0, Batman Arkham, Hellblade, The Council) waiting to be touched, but I'll probably play and finish Minerva's Den first. Not sure I'll immediately move onto Infinite, since it might be good to have a palate cleanser inbetween as to not completely overwhelm myself with BioShock. I do wonder, which in case someone has read this far, feel free to tell me, if Elizabeth will play more of an active role in Infinite. The communication in the first two BioShocks is nice, but impressive cutscenes are really something I've been missing. From everything I've seen of Infinite, it seems to have that in spades. You barely really interact with any characters physically in these first two games, and if that does change in Infinite I'll be a very happy man. I'm also very excited to eventually get to Burial at Sea, which looks like an incredibly interesting piece of DLC. But for now, I shall sign off and do whatever happens next!

Edited on by Tjuz

Tjuz

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