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Topic: The Movie Thread

Posts 761 to 780 of 1,100

Feena

@Th3solution Very interesting thoughts about A quiet place. I am going to see it tomorrow night, I'll keep you posted.

Never belligerent but always uncompromising.

Th3solution

@Feena Thanks. Yeah definitely report back. I’m curious what your take on it might be. And you can go back and read the spoiler tagged items I left and see if you agree.

The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

Th3solution

@KALofKRYPTON I’m not familiar with that book (or movie), A Devil Rides Out. What’s the premise?

Edited on by Th3solution

The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

KALofKRYPTON

@Th3solution Author named Dennis Wheatley. He wrote a small number of occult novels, as well as some war ones based on his national service.

The supernatural ones are excellent, if rather of their time (1930s); there are examples of language and attitudes that are to be expected.

The Devil Rides Out is essentially a story about a group of friends, one of whom falls in with Satanists and the ensuing plot of the Satanists and the efforts of the group to rescue their friend.

The film is by the Hammer House of Horror, made in '68. If you're not sure about who Hammer are - pretty much any British supernatural film you've seen with Christopher Lee, Peter Cushing and their contemporaries was probably made by Hammer. Often low budget, often of questionable quality - but absolutely endearing.

The adaptation of The Devil Rides Out is, barring one scene, note for note identical to the book.

I'd highly recommend reading Wheatley's supernatural books (The military ones are are rather dry). As far as horror goes, it's all rather twee feeling by modern standards - but he did so very much research.

He wrote a non-fiction book called The Satanist using his years of research and even time living as a Satanist for research.
It's all very bonkers, but incredible to think of what was going on in tiny English hamlets in the pre and post WW2 years.

Edited on by KALofKRYPTON

KALofKRYPTON

Kidfried

@KALofKRYPTON Definitely going to watch this. Sounds great, a bit like a British Rosemary's Baby.

Thanks for recommending.

Regard my dear
It's all downhill from here

KALofKRYPTON

@Kidfried
Let me know what you think.
Hammer really made some great films, but mileage may vary on how accepting you are of low budgets and questionable effects work.
Some of their best are:
The Gorgon
The Hound of the Baskervilles
Horror of Dracula
The Curse of Frankenstein
Curse of the Warewolf
Plague of Zombies
The Quatermass trilogy
Twins of Evil
Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed
Dracula Prince of Darkness

There are a few Hammer films I haven't seen. But most made it to DVD. I occasionally pick one up if I'm passing CEX.

EDIT: I totally forgot to mention The Woman In Black!
Hammer made a return to production with The Woman In Black starring Harry Potter himself, Daniel Radcliffe. It's a really good film actually - and Radcliffe is surprisingly watchable given his Hey Presto past.

He's also great in Horns in case you haven't seen that.

Edited on by KALofKRYPTON

KALofKRYPTON

RogerRoger

@Th3solution Thanks for the in-depth response about A Quiet Place and I agree, I'm curious to see what @Feena thinks of the film, too!

I agree; when she woke up in the flooded room, I half-expected it to be a dream / nightmare sequence, because I didn't think it'd flood that quickly, nor did I think the script could be that cruel. All of the other questions you raise are totally valid; the best answer I can come up with (even somebody like me, who's used to defending poor writing) is that it helped the tension and created the final sequences, especially the "don't go into the basement" rule.

That's always a problem when writing fiction. If you have specific scenes you want to end up at, writing backwards to arrive at them can sometimes create fuzzy logic. I have a feeling that the final scene was either written first, or written pretty close to the beginning of the whole process. Also, trains of thought like "We've got to have a bit more tension... so she should step on a nail. How's she gonna step on the nail? Make them all walk without shoes. Okay, done... I mean, we'll have to introduce that element sooner, but that's okay, it'll make sense eventually!" can be commonplace. It doesn't matter that I spent most of the film wondering why they weren't all wearing tennis shoes, because I spent the key thirty seconds of nail-stepping action squirming in my seat.

"Another happy landing."

Ralizah

Saw A Quiet Place last night. I have my issues with it, but it's overall an incredible achievement in focused direction and effective use of sound to build an atmosphere of tension and paranoia. It's nice to see a deliberately artistic, and not mainstream-by-design at all sort of film achieve this kind of success. Seeing this in a theater is a must. My heart jumped in my throat every time a sound distinct enough from the quiet pitter-patter of feet exploded from the speakers, no matter how unnoticeable it would have been in other films. The acting was pretty great as well, and the Clicker-esque monsters were pretty scary. I'm glad the wisely decided to keep them mostly hidden until near the end of the film.

I'm pretty sure the idea didn't come from TLOU, though: it's not like Naughty Dog invented the concept of a monster that navigates by sound.

I really have to question the logic of a world that didn't IMMEDIATELY think to utilize some sort of sonic weapon against these creatures once they realized they navigated the world almost entirely by sound, though. Like... we already have these weapons. Nobody thought to use them? That was some bafflingly stupid writing.

Also, sanctity of life be damned: shame on those people for going through with a pregnancy in a world like that! Were they planning on keeping the baby in that little coffin every time it made a noise, as babies are wont to do? I'd call this more bad writing, but I'm pretty sure I know some people who would be exactly this stupid, so I'll give it a pass.

Pretty good movie otherwise, though. It's always nice when these horror movies come along every few years and seem to redeem the existence of a genre that is dominated by terrible direct-to-video releases.

@Th3solution Great thoughts! I shared a similar experience in terms of the deathly silent theater. The film's incredibly spare sound design makes it where you gain a heightened sense of EVERYTHING around you, and it makes you nervous to cough, adjust your seat, or reach for a bag of snacks. It really is a brilliant parallel to the way the characters in the film had to be incredibly mindful of the sounds they were making. If you think about it, it's an emergent, incredibly context-specific experience that relies on seeing that exact movie in a dark theater, surrounded by other people. Seeing it at home would be an almost entirely different experience. It's experiences like this, I think, that still justify the expense and inconvenience of having to go on a pilgrimage to the cinemas.

Edited on by Ralizah

Switch FC: SW-2726-5961-1794

PSN: Ralizah

Feena

Saw "A quiet place" last night and I agree with all the comments that have been made here.
As you guys pointed out the theatre was incredibly still to the point were I couldn't physically take bite of the cookies I brought with me.

The premise is very ingenious and I liked the direction, though you could imagine the director being pretty green at times. It was a tense and ultimately satisfying creature film but I think the film could have done a lot more by showing us a lot less of our monsters. Nothing is as scary as our imagination running wild. I also thought it finished a bit too soon...I see what they did with the ending but it's somehow unsatisfying.

And yes as @Ralizah pointed out, the fact nobody thought of a sonic kind of weapon is rather strange.

Never belligerent but always uncompromising.

Ralizah

@Feena My mother audibly yelled at the screen: "That's it?!" when the credits started rolling. I didn't mind the ending, but I actually tend to like abrupt endings when they end on an exclamation point like this film did.

The monsters, once we got a good look at them, reminded me of the creature from Cloverfield.

Untitled

Edited on by Ralizah

Switch FC: SW-2726-5961-1794

PSN: Ralizah

Jaz007

I watched Ready Player One. It was a great movie. It had so many awesome references and Easter eggs, and I know there were even more than I saw. I loved the art style they had for the Oasis, it was the perfect blend of realism and fantasy/cartoon. The story was pretty good and I quite liked the casting for the characters. Samantha is particular because I liked how she was pretty, but not freakin gorgeous.
I’ve never read the book nor know anything about it.
All in all I think it could only use a few improvements. It should have had more social commentary, as I really liked the stuff that was there from being in the real world too to the 80% ads without seizures. Also, it needed Nintendo and Sony characters in it, as I don’t think I saw any of them.
Also, Mechagodzilla Vs. Gundam was the best thing ever, I was so excited when that happened. It was the best scene in the movie probably. I’m tided over until King Kong Vs. Godzilla comes out.
Also, that permadeath mechanic would never fly in a real MMO. It worked well for the movie, but could never exist in reality. People like PvP too much.

Backkoggery ID: Jaz007

Gremio108

Sorry to bring up this one again, but I finally got round to watching The Last Jedi. It passed a couple of hours on, but what a strange film. It felt like it had been made by about twelve different people, each with a different idea of what a Star Wars film should be. And it looked like it had been edited by a kid with ADHD. It wasn't that I didn't enjoy it as such, it was just so strange.

Also, I could have done without the milk bit. That was easily the most disturbing scene in any film I have watched recently, and I saw Bone Tomahawk the other day.

Good job, Parappa. You can go on to the next stage now.

PSN: Hallodandy

Th3solution

@Ralizah @RogerRoger @Feena Pretty much all in agreement here about A Quiet Place. It is one of those films that is fun to talk about and I’ve been recommending to all my friends and coworkers, despite its flaws.

The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

RogerRoger

@Th3solution @Ralizah @Feena I had a conversation with one of our group upon leaving the cinema about why the governments of each nation didn't just turn on every single television and radio in a city, wait for all the aliens to descend upon it, and then nuke it.

Even that would've been preferrable to the implied extinction-level event presented in the film. The reply was "Maybe they didn't have time?" to which I pointed out that everybody seemed to have time to print and distribute newspapers tracking the invasion and discovering the aliens' use of sound to kill, and that I'd love to see the silent printing press they'd used for the necessary days / weeks to achieve such a task (I'm always the fun one at parties, in case you were wondering).

It's definitely fun to discuss and pick apart a little, but none of that really matters when it made an entire audience terrified and had great music. Addressing the points we've raised would've steered it more towards a CGI-overloaded action blockbuster than the intimite thriller-horror it ultimately was; it's up to our imaginations to fill in the gaps.

Since watching it last week, I've been thinking a lot about how much sound we make on average. I've got man-flu this week; with this cough, I'd be screwed.

@Gremio108 No need to apologise; we're in complete agreement about the editing (and the milk bit). I've been thinking of trying to watch it again, because I've spoken to a friend who loved it and read a lot more of the comments in this topic now, and think my opinion could be tweaked by a second viewing, but every time I go to try, I think of something else I'd rather be doing... never a good sign.

"Another happy landing."

Th3solution

@RogerRoger Lol. Good points. Yeah, I was thinking all the nighttime snorers were weeded our first. Darwinian natural selection accelerated.

The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

RogerRoger

@Th3solution And that space shuttle toy at the beginning looked so cool. I don't know if I'd be able to restrain myself now, let alone when I was a kid.

So, who's this Darwin guy you're talking about?

"Another happy landing."

Feena

Did anyone else watch Ghost Stories yet?
I really enjoyed the movie even though some of the elements didn't fall into place as well as I hoped -<nd writing that just now I realised it's really hard to talk about the movie without spoiling.
Anyway, it's a little more than just an anthology of horror tales and I do recommend it to cinephiles and horror buffs. It's not anything shockingly new but it is extremely well done and it has a nice, unique pace and some quirky storytelling choices. I am very curious to read your comments about this one.

Never belligerent but always uncompromising.

Star-Lord

I'm so excited for Avengers: Infinity War! 😀

Star-Lord

PSN: Drax-UK

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