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Topic: The Movie Thread

Posts 541 to 560 of 1,091

Gremio108

Yeah, absolutely. It's kind of an Alien clone, but it's a good one.

Good job, Parappa. You can go on to the next stage now.

PSN: Hallodandy

RR529

Watched Sonatine this morning. One of the many Yakuza films Takeshi Kitano has done throughout his career. Definitely worth a look if you're into Japanese films.

BTW, I typically watch anime dubbed, and was wondering if Your Name would still be as highly recommended if I watched it dubbed? (I don't even know if it has one as I haven't looked much into it, but I've heard a lot of good things)

Edited on by RR529

Blog: https://rrblogweb.wordpress.com/

Currently Playing: Hitman GO

Recently Beat: Castle of Illussion: Starring Mickey Mouse, Lara Croft GO, Front Mission Evolved

JohnnyShoulder

Watched Baby Driver the other day. Not a bad film but I think my expectations were a bit high and found it a bit derivative in terms of plot and story. Also thought the scenes in time to music would be better implemented and it came across as a bit gimmicky.

JohnnyShoulder

Th3solution

Just a random note ... in 2018 we are getting a lot of video game related movies. Jumanji, Ready Player One, Tomb Raider, Rampage, Wreck It Ralph 2, ...
Frankly, most of the time Video game movies are garbage, but it seems like there is increasing interest in cross-over projects.

The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

Tasuki

@Th3solution If it's a movie based on a franchise that was originally a video game i.e. Tomb Raider, Rampage, Mortal Kombat I find them to be really bad. Something like Wreck it Ralph where as it's not based on video game per say isn't that bad.

I think it's because we already have an idea on what Tomb Raider is suppose to be like and when it's changed or different for whatever reason it just seems bad or odd if that makes sense at all.

As for Jumanji In wouldn't necessary consider it a video gameovie, heck I didn't consider the original a board game movie 😂 but maybe that's just me.

Push Square Moderator and all around retro gamer.

My Backlog

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Th3solution

@Tasuki I haven’t seen Jumanji yet. (Not a fan of The Rock, actually. I can’t figure out the appeal there.) But I saw the trailer and it looks like they start by finding an old video game and when they play it, they jump into the game and become the characters they chose in the game. But, yeah, I don’t remember there being a Jumanji video game but maybe there was one before my time.

The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

Th3solution

@Tasuki Actually I found this really good article. https://www.forbes.com/sites/erikkain/2017/12/27/jumanji-work...
It talks about not only Jumanji (actually makes me want to see it now) but the author echos almost exactly what you said about why game-to-movie and movie-to-game adaptations fail. It has to do with our preconceived expectations. Evidently Jumanji breaks the mold as it relates to this issue and therefore is more enjoyable, like Wreck it Ralph.

The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

Tasuki

@Th3solution Yeah I don't think there was a Jumanji game before but I can't be certain on that. Jumanji is actual a sequel/remake/reboot of the one that stared Robin Williams from the 90's where Jumanji took the form of a board game so there really wasn't any preconceived ideas before hand as it's not based off of an actual video game.

Edited on by Tasuki

Push Square Moderator and all around retro gamer.

My Backlog

PSN: Tasuki3711

Ralizah

The Shape of Water: A mute woman working as a janitor in a research facility befriends and falls in love with a water monster that was stolen from its home in South America and brought in for testing. A fairly run-of-the-mill "beauty and the beast"-esque fable that dredges up the usual tired cinematic tropes about the oppressive cultural evils of mid-20th century America, toxic masculinity, and whatnot. Guillermo del Toro is going for the same mix of whimsical fantasy and horrifying, grounded violence that defined the unique vibe of his masterpiece, "Pan's Labyrinth," but it all really fell flat for me. The film's villain... the actor performs his role very well, but the actual character is boring beyond words. The film is also periodically interrupted by unnecessary, and often disgusting, sex scenes, which really takes away from the mood it tries so hard to establish with its excellent set design (this has a retro-futuristic aesthetic not unlike Bioshock going for it). Its best trick is to establish the film's tortured monster man on a spectrum of oppression: he seems like a fellow social outcast alongside the African-Americans, homosexuals, and other oppressed people in this setting, which allows for a fairly smooth integration of biting social commentary into the plot. Overall, though, it was a massive disappointment.

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri: The mother of a girl who was violated and murdered rents out billboards in her small and poor Missouri community to taunt and challenge local law enforcement after they fail to find her daughter's killer. It has been a week or two since I saw this, and my thoughts on it still aren't entirely in order. It's a remarkable work of art, mixing absolutely vicious satirical jabs at rural white America, a well-paced plot, complex and very human characters, a savagely funny script, grounded acting, and the feel of a Flannery O'Connor story (there's no way she wasn't a huge inspiration on the writer) together to create something special. The writer was a playwright, and that comes across on screen, because this movie is driven by wonderfully written character exchanges. The ending is inconclusive, but so is life, and a neat story that can be tied up with a pretty bow is not what this film was going for. One of the best films of 2017, and an absolute must see.

Princess Mononoke: A warrior from a small Japanese tribe named Ashitaka is exiled from this home after being cursed by a tainted boar god that attacked his village. He sets out on a quest to lift his curse that eventually lands him right in the middle of a violent conflict between a burdgeoning mining town (led by the ambitious Lady Eboshi) and local animal gods who are fighting back against the destruction of their lands (joined by the titular Princess Mononoke, a spirited girl who was raised by wolves). I've actually seen this before, but it has been many years, so much of it was fresh to me. My memories of it were apparently spot on. This film is still an utter delight! Miyazaki's environmentalism and humanism are quite clearly reflected in this film, but it's much less naively optimistic in this regard than previous films of his that treated similar themes (most notably, Studio Ghibli's first major motion picture, Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind). It's his nuanced exploration of the "man versus nature" theme and its subversion of traditional cinematic tropes that makes it a really special film in his catalogue. The film is hardly hopeless, though, ending with a grounded and fragile hope. This continues to be one of the best animated films I've ever seen.

Edited on by Ralizah

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Feena

^ 3 lovely movies! Though I don't think shape of the water is a masterpiece, it's still worth watching.

Never belligerent but always uncompromising.

Ralizah

@Feena The Shape of Water is certainly a competently produced film, but I fail to see why it has received such critical acclaim. Take out the superior aesthetic design and you have something eerily similar to tripe like Monster Trucks. Not that a movie can't succeed on aesthetics alone (one of my all-time favorite films, Kill Bill: Vol. 1, is arguably nothing but pure style and craftsmanship), but Guillermo del Toro isn't giving us anything transcendentally awesome in form here.

I am seriously toying with the notion of calling Princess Mononoke my favorite Ghibli film. It doesn't have the raw power and craftsmanship of Grave of the Fireflies, but it also doesn't ruin my week when I watch it like the fore-mentioned film (seriously: watching GotF is an exercise in pure masochism unless you have a heart made of tempered steel).

Switch FC: SW-2726-5961-1794

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Feena

@Ralizah kill bill vol.1 is one of my all time favourites!

Regarding Ghibli, I like most of their production but I tend to prefer the movies that aren't directed by Miyazaki - Mononoke is certainly one of his bests, though. I'd pick something like Whisper of the Heart or Only Yesterday as my Ghibli favourite.

Never belligerent but always uncompromising.

themcnoisy

Watched Home Alone 3 with the family last night.

Its actually pretty funny.

Also I miss the time we didnt have mobile phones, life was better somehow.

Forum Best Game of All Time Awards

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Rudy_Manchego

I watched Bladerunner 2049 this week and thought it was truly amazing.

Now I may be an idiot, but there's one thing I am not sir, and that sir, is an idiot

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Ralizah

@Rudy_Manchego My favorite film of 2017. The fact that it flopped in the box office disappoints me to no end.

Switch FC: SW-2726-5961-1794

PSN: Ralizah

JohnnyShoulder

@Ralizah The original was never a hit at the box office iirc. So maybe this one will become gain a but of a cult following too.

JohnnyShoulder

Rudy_Manchego

@Ralizah @JohnnyShoulder Yeah, this film was just great. I am not surprised that it didn't succeed at the box office, long film, slow and deliberate pacing and characterisation, no major action scenes and it makes you think. Sad but true. I agree this is going to become a minor classic in time.

Now I may be an idiot, but there's one thing I am not sir, and that sir, is an idiot

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RR529

Godzilla "2014" (Amazon Video) - I've been in a big Godzilla mood recently, as you'll see reading down this list, so I bought this. I really like how they did this one. Godzilla is actually Godzilla in this one and not some overgrown Iguana, the human characters are effective enough to be worth following, but not powerful enough to resolve things without the big guy, and it's overall a very good blockbuster type film.

Godzilla: Monster Planet (Netflix Original) - The first entry in an anime film trilogy funded by the streaming giant. While it has a fresh take on the franchise (Godzilla has destroyed civilization, and thousands of years later humanity is now back from deep space in an attempt to reclaim the planet), it's just blah. It's visually dull, and despite all the time you spend with them, it never makes you care about the human characters. A few interesting things occured at the film's end however, so I'll probably give the second a chance when it releases.

Mudbound (Netflix Original) - Film chronicalling the intertwined hardships of two families (one white, the other black) in rural 40's Mississippi. It's a well made film, but unbearably depressing & constantly tense. I felt miserable by the end (though it looked like there may have been a positive ending, though I'm not sure).

Shin Godzilla (Amazon Video) - A reboot for the franchise that sees the titular Kaiju returned to metaphor for real life tragedy. This time he represents the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake, and the consequences of the Japanese government's mishandling of the event. There can be a lot going on at times, but I think It's one I'd like to rewatch occasionally to really get it.

Summer Wars (Amazon Video) - I LOVE THIS MOVIE! I'm becoming an old fuddy duddy when it comes to anime. While they can be entertaining, newer efforts like One Punch Man, Attack on Titan, and the like just don't seem to grab me like the series' of my adolescence. However, this movie sure is something special. When I first watched it a few years ago it grabbed me like those franchises of old, and no matter how many times I watch it, it always has that magic to it. Fantastic.

Violent Cop (Amazon Video) - The oldest, and most disappointing Takeshi Kitano film I've watched. It's different from his other films I've seen in that he's an edgy cop rather than a member of the Yakuza, and while it's interesting enough at first, I feel like it drags on (it isn't that long of a film either), and there's no real personal conflict/chemistry between the antagonists & himself, except for maybe the final 20 minutes (and even then I'm not sure if their slight against him was entirely intentional, but rather an unlucky coincidence).

Blog: https://rrblogweb.wordpress.com/

Currently Playing: Hitman GO

Recently Beat: Castle of Illussion: Starring Mickey Mouse, Lara Croft GO, Front Mission Evolved

JohnnyShoulder

Colossal - Bit of an odd one this. Part Kaiju movie and part amiercan indie romance com. What is even weirder is that is not the part of the film that doesn't make sense, but the sudden tonal shifts from some of the characters. And the standard roman com stuff is a bit by the numbers. All the actors are good Anne Hathaway, Jason Sudeikis, Dan Stevens, with only Hathaway being not being that believeable as a drunk the only blot.
Defo worth a watch if you fancy something different. I don't think there will be anything quite like it for awhile.

JohnnyShoulder

JohnnyShoulder

It Comes At Night. Not the horror flick that the marketing and the misleading title wants you think it is. More a psychological thriller about the impact of the unexplained event, the paranoia and solitude that goes with.
Expertly crafted with some neat editing tricks with aspect ratio, and some scenes oozing tension. The cast are excellent too with Joel Edgerton in particular giving a stand out performance.
Unfortunately the story telling is very ambiguous which I don't mind, but it answers hardly anything which leaves an unsatisfying ending.

JohnnyShoulder

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