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Topic: The Movie Thread

Posts 3,601 to 3,620 of 3,866

DonJorginho

@nessisonett It was truly off the walls nuts but I adored it and even purchased the UHD Bluray which cost me £45 pounds taking in international shipping lol!

And RPatz is becoming one of the best actors of this generation, I really started to take notice of him when he was in that Cosmopolis and I started to look forward to projects with him, whenever I would talk to my friends about how good he was they would laugh at me for thinking that "The guy from Twilight" was a good actor.

And when Good Time came out I felt like my praise for him had been fully paid for by the amazing and powerful raw performance from Rob, and ever since he has just gotten better and better with his films being so interesting.

When you also remember that he is co-starring in a Christopher Nolan film this year in Tenet it really shows his glowup!

And he was responsible for Magdalene? Jesus he may be one of my favourite people ever as that album was perfection.

All we need is him to be cast in a Denis Villeneuve, Martin Scorsese or Noah Baumbach/Greta Gerwig film and he will cement his spot with many as a top top actor.

Edited on by DonJorginho

DonJorginho

Arugula

Watched The Lighthouse. Fascinating film. I didn't love it but I see why it's very highly rated. Startling cinematography and exceptional acting.

Jexi. Very crass but I was chuckling throughout and found it downright hilarious at times.

Arugula

Tjuz

@Arugula I'm glad to see you were able to sit through Gemini Man and get at least something out of it. Personally, I hated it. Easily the very worst movie I had the displeasure of seeing last year. Horrible script (most of all the dialogue), stiff acting (despite me loving MEW in other fare) and highly uninteresting action sequences. The only part of the movie that may have been somewhat enjoyable was the first time the two Will Smiths fought. I'm not the type to walk out on a movie in the cinema, but if I was, this would definitely have been a movie where that was the case!

Tjuz

KALofKRYPTON

Saw 1917 at the weekend.

Decent film, possibly a touch over-hyped but a fine technical achievement and skips the gratuity of the likes of Saving Private Ryan but maintains a realistic incidental depiction of the horrors of the trenches.
Excellent casting for the most part with many a period-appropriate looking face. The 'single shot' illusion works very well, though my partner (who is not a gamer) came out of it and said it felt very 'video gamey' in parts.

I also watched Terminator: Dark Fate. Not the worst film you'll ever see, but we have seen it all before.
While Dark Fate suffers somewhat from the 'go woke, go broke' sentiment (Dani Ramos is possibly the least convincing resistance leader they could have conceived), the biggest issue with the film is what I said first - we've seen all of this before in one shape or form, and better.

Between the 'tech-noir'/horror brilliance of The Terminator, the perfect summer blockbuster sequel of Judgement day and even the immensely flawed but brilliantly ended Rise of the Machines - there was never any more need for Terminator films. Salvation was mostly a missed opportunity for the dark, pink lasered future war we'd glimpsed previously and the less said about Genysys the better.

Dark Fate offers nothing new.
Whether you're appreciative of the lean in to 'strong female archetype' (because we all know male sci-fi fans can't cope with 'strong women'...) or not, the film never ever feels like anything more than a franchise soft reboot developed for financial gain.

Edited on by KALofKRYPTON

PSN: KALofKRYPTON (so you can see how often I don't play anything!)

Twitter: @KALofKRYPTON (at your own risk, I don't care if you're offended)

"Fate: Protects fools, little children, and ships named Enterprise." - Cmdr William T. Riker

Th3solution

@KALofKRYPTON Thanks for your well organized thoughts. I’ve no real interest in Dark Fate, but it sounds like I need to see 1917. I like a good war movie.

The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

KALofKRYPTON

@Th3solution It's more a war movie than say, Jarhead, but less of one than Saving Private Ryan. The intimate shooting style very much emphasises the feeling of being on a journey through a war, rather than watching a war film.

PSN: KALofKRYPTON (so you can see how often I don't play anything!)

Twitter: @KALofKRYPTON (at your own risk, I don't care if you're offended)

"Fate: Protects fools, little children, and ships named Enterprise." - Cmdr William T. Riker

nessisonett

@KALofKRYPTON I agree about you with how forced Dark Fate felt in terms of the female characters. They seem to have entirely forgotten that it was characters like Sarah Connor and Ellen Ripley that were trailblazers, not cardboard cut-out resistance leaders.

Socks before or after trousers, but never socks before pants, that's the rule. Makes a man look scary, like a chicken.

KALofKRYPTON

@nessisonett Grace is a good remnant of Salvation to a point, but her reliance on medication is a bit of a bizarre and also rather lazy bit of artificial stakes-making.

I also forgot to mention how paper-thin the future scenario is left. Given that Kyle Reece explains the original scenario pretty concisely in about 5 lines of dialogue in The Terminator aided by the opening shots, you would think that they have a pretty good template to work from; but in Dark Fate we're given as little information as the writers could think of, as late as possible in the script to differentiate it. Even when questions are asked and natural avenues of exposition present themselves, our time travelling character just keeps avoiding answering, in a way that feels like the writers really didn't know how to spin it out.

PSN: KALofKRYPTON (so you can see how often I don't play anything!)

Twitter: @KALofKRYPTON (at your own risk, I don't care if you're offended)

"Fate: Protects fools, little children, and ships named Enterprise." - Cmdr William T. Riker

Foxy-Goddess-Scotchy

Only just saw that scene you posted @Ralizah from the Happening. That... certainly was something!


I watched Mission Impossible: Fallout over the weekend for the second time.

There's something about this entry that I just don't enjoy and I don't entirely know why. When I originally watched it I thought it may've just been my mood but I wasn't feeling it this time either which is a shame as it's without a doubt a well made flick...

Ghost Protocol is still my favourite of the series overall and I enjoyed the fifth better too.

I also saw Kubo and the Two Strings... In fact I saw it just.

I have to admit I haven't liked any of Laika's previous efforts all that much (Though I haven't seen Paranorman). Well made undeniably but they just really haven't clicked ... So I was pretty glad to finally liked something of theirs!

And I loved everything about it. The cast (Rooney Mara was particularly great as the creepy sisters though Charlize Theron was wonderful too), the tone, the aesthetics... Hell I even liked the end credits song!

Kinda wish I'd seen this on the big screen... That giant stop motion puppet skeleton was seriously impressive to boot!

Ya don't need to save the world to find meaning in life. Sometimes all ya need is something simple, like someone to take care of - Aigis Persona 3

PSN:GoddessFoxy-E

》My No Commentary PS4 Youtube Channel《

JohnnyShoulder

Oh yes Kubo and the Two Strings is fab @Foxy-Goddess-Scotchy. Paranorman is worth a watch, but I'd probably give the latest one a miss, the name for which totally escapes me (and can't be bothered to Google it).

We are now in a world of people being offended for other people who they think should be offended, who arent offended.

There is no longer a good time to release a game. There are only less s**t times to release a game

PSN: JohnnyShoulder

WanderingBullet

Netflix's currently developing The Witcher: Nightmare of the Wolf, a standalone anime movie that is designed to expand the world of the Netflix’s series. It's being developed by Studio Mir, the Korean animation company who made The Legend of Korra and Netflix’s Voltron: Legendary Defender series.

Edited on by WanderingBullet

Huntin' monsters erryday.

Ralizah

Watched two movies recently. The newest Makoto Shinkai film Weathering With You and Sam Mendes' Oscar buzzy 1917.

Weathering With You is... a film I'm conflicted about. On one hand, like all of Shinkai's films (even the short, low-budget ones he made at home), it's beautifully animated. Moreso than any of his previous works, Weathering is a work of pure visual art, making every second of this nearly two-hour film entrancing to look at. The attention to detail in the environments is nearly photorealistic this time around, and simple sequences of, say, rain hitting the neon-lit pavement of dark Tokyo streets (and, good god, will you see a lot of rain in this film) will leave one gawking in wonder at the sheer artistry on display. The soundtrack, prominently featuring songs from indie rock band Radwimps, whose music also featured heavily in Shinkai's previous film, is mostly excellent. The film is filled with realistic, likable personalities, and it's fun to watch them interacting on-screen.

The issues I have relate partially to the concept of the film, partially to the tone, and partially to the structure of it overall. In Weathering, we follow a young runaway named Hodaka who tries to survive on the unforgiving streets of Tokyo before being taken in Keisuke Suga, a man who had saved his life on the trip there and who, we come to find, runs a small publication dedicated to yellow journalism. The city of Tokyo (and, presumably, other parts of the world) is suffering from an endless rainfall (while the actual origin of this phenomenon isn't given much focus in the film, it seems to be some sort of new, abnormal climate phenomenon). After being taken in by Keisuke and helping him to write for the paper, Hodaka comes across a young girl named Hina, a so-called weather maiden or "sunshine girl," who is able to use mysterious powers to temporarily will away the rain. Hodaka convinces Hina, who is struggling to pay the bills for herself and her younger brother after the death of her only parent, to start a business and use her business to help enrich herself.

There's obviously more that happens, but this is the basic setup of the film. Unlike most of the auteur's films, it's a bit of an involved set-up, and it takes awhile to get going. There's too much going on thematically, between the implicit social satire, the weird mythology surrounding weather maidens, the elaborate climate change analogy (an element of the film that's just sort of hand-waved away at the end without much consideration), as well as at least one momentous moral decision made near the end that makes me wish the film had reflected to some degree on its wholesale rejection of utilitarianism.

What's here is certainly interesting, but it doesn't really help the plot. Previous Shinkai films work so well because they're always about people in love who find some sort of overwhelming social or natural force coming between them. That... exists here as well, to some extent, but it's much less totalizing and, as a result, much less impactful.

Which leads me into my biggest issue with the film: it's almost completely lacking in the overwhelming sense of longing and loss that has typified his work since the very beginning. Part of this is, as has been mentioning, the lack of stakes in this film compared to a lot of his other previous work (particular Your Name and Voices of a Distant Star, but also, in a more grounded and perhaps devastating sense, 5 Centimeters Per Second). More generally, though, the sense of 'mono no aware' generally found in his work is almost nowhere to be seen here. The sense of deep loneliness, pain, and longing for connection that forms the emotional core of his work is somewhat muted here (beyond the very beginning of the film, when we find out how tough it is to survive in Tokyo as a runaway with nothing to his name), and the result is that the film's climax doesn't smack you with the same emotional impact as most of his other work (although I can, perhaps, do without something so emotionally potent that it ends up putting me in a melancholic funk for days on end, like after the first time I viewed 5 Centimeters Per Second).

I've tried to avoid mentioning Your Name to this point, but, honestly, the film practically invites invitations to Shinkai's breakout 2016 masterwork. Both films feature plots that mix elements of Eastern mysticism, teen romance, coming-of-age dramas, magical realism, and disaster flicks. Both films feel distinctly YA-oriented. The Radwimps music, which so helped to distinguish Your Name from Shinkai's previous work, also perpetuates the feeling that Weathering is more in line with that film than anything else Shinkai has made in the past. Most importantly, though, Weathering's plot structure is very similar to the basic structure of Your Name, despite the content not really justifying it. I think, despite his amazing success, Shinkai will only wither as a talent if he doesn't allow himself to escape from the influence of his previous film. It also really doesn't help that, as decent as it is (I know my post sounds negative, but I really did quite enjoy my time with this film), Weathering fares poorly when compared to Your Name, which was, in turns, funny, deeply romantic, brilliantly crafted (the mid-film twist was so devastating and well-done), and ultimately far more than the sum of its parts.

This impression sound distinctly negative, but I don't really mean it to. Weathering With You is a beautifully animated and deeply enjoyable little film that I'd recommend to almost anyone. It's better than the vast majority of films released in a given year (and certainly a good deal better than several of Shinkai's own underwhelming mid-career films, which often lacked the sense of identity that made 5 Centimeters and Voices so memorable), and I had a smile on my face almost the entire time I watched it. But, as a fan of Shinkai's work, and especially coming on the heels of one of the greatest animated films of all time, I feel like one was just not quite as good as I was hoping it'd be. Take that less as a condemnation of this particular film and more of a sign of my deep respect for Shinkai as an artist.

As for 1917... look, the film is going to win awards, and I'm cool with that. It's certainly interesting enough. But the film feels gimmicky. For those who don't know, it's a WW1 drama about two English soldiers who are tasked with crossing a large amount of terrain to call off an attack that'll otherwise lead to 1500 or so troops being ambushed and slaughtered by German forces. That's the setup for this film, but it's also the bulk of the plot, if it can even be said to have one. The gimmick behind this film is that the entire thing feels like it's composed of one unbroken shot throughout (like other films that do this, of course, it's actually not, and clever editing is used to hide the seams), sort of like the recent God of War game. I suppose the intention was to immerse the viewer in the immediacy of the setting, which I initially hoped it might, but the effect, instead, was sort of the opposite: the gimmick robbed the film of any sense of potency or reality for me. When characters are forced to travel long distances, you need broken shots to impart a sense of time passing without it happening in real time. As it stands, the main character makes a journey that's supposedly 8 or so hours over the course of less than two real-time hours. The effect of this, between the constantly shifting scenery and the need for stuff to happen in lieu of things like plot or character development (there's a lot of talking in this film, but I left it feeling like these people were still pure strangers to me), is that the film feels like... a live-action Naughty Dog game, maybe? Or a WW1-themed amusement park ride? The film hurriedly shuffles the main character (and the viewer along with him) from set-piece to set-piece. Stuff happens, things blow up, people die, but it all felt supremely staged and artificial to me.

Don't get me wrong: as a technical achievement, it's fairly impressive. The sets, makeup, and whatnot are impressive, and the film is filled with striking imagery. But it all seems a bit hollow by the end. It attempts to top the horrifying, immanent experience of war that was so successfully communciated by Christopher Nolan's excellent Dunkirk, but the impression I had, by the end, was that the director had no understanding of how to get inside the minds of his characters, and, as a result, he left me feeling a bit cold by the conclusion.

@nessisonett

Edited on by Ralizah

Playing depressing games alone in my cold, dark room <3

PSN: Ralizah

nessisonett

@Ralizah It’s a shame that Weathering With You doesn’t seem to have totally lived up the huge expectations after Your Name but I’ll definitely still give it a watch. Great review of 1917 as well, I’ve heard mixed things despite the obvious awards it’ll win.

Socks before or after trousers, but never socks before pants, that's the rule. Makes a man look scary, like a chicken.

AdamantiumClaws

@Ralizah It's disappointing that so many did not appreciate Glass. It had its flaws, sure, but I thought it was an awesome movie. I only really had issue with the ending. For me it was one of the best movies of 2019, and I hope Shyamalan continues the series.

And I'm in the party that thought The Village was quite good.

Even the rocks do not recall.

AdamantiumClaws

I saw Parasite yesterday. I kind of wished I had gathered more information before going in. It was unpleasant, and I left the theater quite depressed. I wouldn't recommend it.

Even the rocks do not recall.

RogerRoger

I'm back to watching movies again after a brief self-imposed exile and, with only a couple days remaining on my friend's NowTV subscription, just saw Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse.

Secretly, despite being a DC fanboy, I've always liked the idea of Spider-Man. Because of a slightly-more-than-passing familiarity with his lore, therefore, there's always been a lingering temptation to delve deeper than the Tobey Maguire trilogy. I came darn close with Marvel's Spider-Man on PS4, and Tom Holland's recent live-action shenanigans have been charming enough, but Into the Spider-Verse might've just (finally) pushed me over the edge. It was phenomenal.

In taking a lifetime's worth of history across multiple formats and mashing it together for less than two hours, Into the Spider-Verse does the impossible by keeping its chaos easy to follow, emotionally accessible and laugh-out-loud funny from beginning to end. Miles Morales is a far more compelling character than Peter Parker ever was, and his origins were much more interesting to explore, even though they consisted of identikit pieces pulled from what has become superhero cliché. Helps that the voice acting was superb across the board, but particular credit to Shameik Moore and Brian Tyree Henry, who worked overtime to sell the relationship between Miles and his father. I'd expected to laugh, but I hadn't expected to cry.

Love the animation style, too. At first it was a little jarring, almost too frenetic to keep pace with, but I settled in soon enough and could appreciate its unique combination of realistic CGI, cel-shaded characters and comic book flair. The only downside was that, because I was streaming, visually-busy shots lost coherence and quality and, well... this is a visually-busy film, like, all the time. As a result, I'm gonna pick up the Blu-Ray later this week and watch it again.

With that done, I've got Bumblebee and The LEGO Movie 2 remaining, but I fear none of them are gonna top Into the Spider-Verse for me. What a joyful triumph of a spectacle. Now, I wonder how much my local GAME is selling the PS4 game for...?

@Th3solution @mookysam @JohnnyShoulder @KALofKRYPTON Tagging you fine folks because you'd said all those nice things about the film; apologies if I've missed anybody else who did so.

PSN ID: GDS_2421
Making It So Since 1987

KALofKRYPTON

@RogerRoger Great. It is such a good film!

Bumblebee is, for one scene - a tiny apology for the Bay films and a small morsel of G1 design Cybertron flashback .
It's perfectly alright. The story is largely a slightly more considered retread of the first Bay film with the fat cut off.

Still haven't seen the LEGO Movie 2. I just imagined it really wouldn't be a patch on the first.

PSN: KALofKRYPTON (so you can see how often I don't play anything!)

Twitter: @KALofKRYPTON (at your own risk, I don't care if you're offended)

"Fate: Protects fools, little children, and ships named Enterprise." - Cmdr William T. Riker

RogerRoger

@KALofKRYPTON Given that I haven't seen the first Transformers, not after the second left me recoiling in horror, it sounds like I'll have a good time with Bumblebee. Cheers!

PSN ID: GDS_2421
Making It So Since 1987

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