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Topic: The Creative Writing/Literature Topic

Posts 61 to 70 of 70

Ralizah

@Solea
I've gifted copies of Finnegans Wake... as a joke. I still keep a copy on my desk at work, so that, when unwary passersby ask me what it's about, I can tell them: "Just read a paragraph... any page," and then watch their increasingly puzzled faces with an adolescent prankster's sense of self-amusement.

Playing depressing games alone in my cold, dark room <3

PSN: Ralizah

Draco_V_Ecliptic

@Ralizah Have you read Ulysses? If so, what did you think? (Apart from it being readable obviously)

Russia, Russia, where are you heading? On, on, like the whirlwind!

PSN: Draco_V_Ecliptic

Draco_V_Ecliptic

Any Henry Miller fans on here? I've read most of Tropic of Capricorn and I've read Nexus, Plexus etc. and I think he was a very talented writer, his attitude towards women aside, I think he was very interested in creativity and art. Two things I am very interested in, as well.

Russia, Russia, where are you heading? On, on, like the whirlwind!

PSN: Draco_V_Ecliptic

RogerRoger

@Draco_V_Ecliptic Unfortunately, no. I don't read half as much as I should... heck, I kinda don't read!

But it's always good to store a name away for the day I do get the urge, so thanks for the question all the same, and I'll keep his name in mind.

PSN ID: GDS_2421
Making It So Since 1987

Ralizah

@Draco_V_Ecliptic Sorry. I didn't get a notification about your post, for whatever reason. I wasn't just ignoring you.

When it comes to Ulysses... it's another book you don't really 'read.' Not in the conventional way. While it's actually comprehensible (for the most part; that chapter that's pages and pages of two or three giant, run-on sentences without spacing or punctuation can go burn in a fire), it's so overwritten that it can't really be enjoyed in any conventional sense. Literature nerds often love it, of course, because it gives them the opportunity to show off their range of knowledge about the various allusions to mythology and modernist motifs that permeate the work, but I think it's an aggressively pretentious work of fiction that is basically only remarkable because of the obscenity trial that popped up around it.

IMO, the best work of fiction Joyce ever turned out was his short fiction collection Dubliners, which avoids pretentious literary experimentation in favor of clever writing that alludes to inner realizations and transformations that we never really see.

Edited on by Ralizah

Playing depressing games alone in my cold, dark room <3

PSN: Ralizah

DonJorginho

I don't know if this is the right forum to post this in, but I just thought it would be nice to announce that I am currently working on the first rough draft of my first screenplay called Family Ties!

Films are my biggest passion alongside writing my own stories, so have decided to put two and two together and am currently writing a deep drama/thriller which I am taking heavy inspiration off the vibes of films such as Good Time, The Departed and Blue Story.

I will post updates when available on this thread and will post up short sections of scenes.

Edited on by DonJorginho

DonJorginho

RogerRoger

@DonJorginho Sounds great! Best of luck with it, and would love to see some as / when you're prepared to post it (although remember that this is a public forum and so, if you're hoping to sell an original screenplay for production someday, be careful about how much you freely share).

PSN ID: GDS_2421
Making It So Since 1987

Draco_V_Ecliptic

@Ralizah Yeah, I am a bit of a literature nerd I must confess so the deft craftsmanship of Ulysses impresses me. However, you say Dubliners is better, so, I'll give it a go.
I'm currently reading Hidden Faces by Dali, a literature nerd's best novel of the year (Literature nerd on Youtube). It's the only novel he wrote, based on what I've read, it's really good, artistic, just as much as you'd expect.

Russia, Russia, where are you heading? On, on, like the whirlwind!

PSN: Draco_V_Ecliptic

Ralizah

@Draco_V_Ecliptic If you haven't already, I'd recommend looking into Joseph Campbell and Henry Morton Robinson's interesting analysis of Finnegans Wake. It doesn't improve the novel as a piece of entertainment, but it does provide valuable insight into the mythic themes and symbolism employed throughout it.

I actually had no idea that Salvador Dali every wrote a novel! Thanks for the heads up. Probably haven't thought about the man since a low-res rip of Un Chien Andalou that I downloaded from Napster as a teenager introduced me to the world of surrealist cinema.

Playing depressing games alone in my cold, dark room <3

PSN: Ralizah

Draco_V_Ecliptic

@Ralizah I just finished Hidden Faces (Dali's novel). Hope you enjoy it if you do pick it up. I especially liked the character of the Count de Grandsailles, detestable though he proved himself to be. Is Un Chien Andalou any good? I might watch it. I am just starting The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings series of books as I've never read them, and The Hero with a Thousand Faces by Campbell is also on my to-read list. Thanks for the Finnegans Wake recommendation.

Edited on by Draco_V_Ecliptic

Russia, Russia, where are you heading? On, on, like the whirlwind!

PSN: Draco_V_Ecliptic

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