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Topic: Team [404 - Team Name Not Found] Deliberation Station

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RogerRoger

@Jaz007 @Th3solution @Frigate @themcnoisy @TowaHerschel7

Comrades, I reckon @themcnoisy is absolutely right in his comment about the LEGO games; namely that if you're a fan of the franchise they're representing, they're great and if you're not, they're kinda not. There have been incremental improvements and examples of growth, however, when you look beyond the fan service. I'm gonna do a rundown of the ones I've actually played and talk about the reasons why I'd rank them accordingly, but if you feel at any time that I'm being less than objective, step in and say so, please.

For the record, I'm a huge fan of Batman, Indiana Jones and Star Wars, and I like Jurassic Park (although to a much lesser degree). The other franchises represented I'm pretty cool towards, even if I have ended up playing the associated LEGO game for a while anyway.

PSN ID: GDS_2421
Making It So Since 1987

RogerRoger

First up, though...

L.A. Noire is an underrated gem. Granted, I've only played the PS4 remaster and I understand that the PS3 version caused a lot of consoles to overheat at launch (particularly PS3 Slims) but the groundbreaking facial capture technology deserves a huge nod, even if its implementation in the gameplay was a little wonky and therefore tough to "get right" when interrogating a suspect. For having a stellar cast and delivering authenticity, I'd praise it, but a relatively-empty Los Angeles and rough edges limit that praise. I'd call it a low Important but if anybody wants to categorise it as Existing, that'd be fine with me.

Okay, LEGO time!

Never played the first LEGO Batman game. I'll do some research on it (and all the other games on the list I haven't played) and come back to you tomorrow.

LEGO Batman 2: DC Super-Heroes was the first LEGO game to include an original script with full voice-acting. Whilst this may seem like a small thing, it opened the door for the LEGO games to be more creative in their storytelling (up until then, everything had been dialogue-free grunts, sighs and laughs, which had its own charm but had peaked with LEGO Star Wars III: The Clone Wars). The game's funny, well-paced cutscenes were polished up and released on DVD and Blu-Ray, the huge popularity of which paved the way for Batman's inclusion in The LEGO Movie and ultimately his own spin-off film. This originality bled into the gameplay, leading to some spectacular and imaginative levels that weren't constrained by "but we have to replicate what happened in the movie". It's a big, bold sandbox with a lot of detail, released right at the height of the franchise's popularity (because yeah, after this, things started to go downhill on a regular basis). I'd call it Important.

I played LEGO Batman 3: Beyond Gotham on PS4, but did sample the PS3 version at a friend's house and so, in terms of technical performance, there were some drawbacks; the framerate is less stable, load times are longer, pop-in can be frequent. It also isn't as coherent as its predecessor. The Watchtower hub feels claustrophobic and a little confusing, and there are also the seven Lantern Worlds which are cute but crowded. The once-simple abilities of different characters have started to feel overloaded and there's a lot of stop-start to the gameplay, as you frantically switch between multiple versions of multiple characters to find that one thing you need to proceed. The story (once again an original effort) is still decent, but anti-climactic and not a patch on what came before. It's perhaps the greatest for fan service, not least because the late Adam West is given a beautiful starring role and his own hilarious Batman '66 level, but that can only do so much of the heavy lifting. Not Important for this one, I'm afraid.

I've never played LEGO Dimensions, nor the LEGO Harry Potter games. Skip!

Alas, I got the first LEGO Indiana Jones game on Nintendo DS and so never felt the urge to get it on a main console; I'll research that one later. LEGO Indiana Jones 2: The Adventure Continues, meanwhile, tries to do a few new things but doesn't quite stick the landing. It's the first licenced LEGO game to offer a level builder, where you actually place LEGO bricks and construct a simple platforming challenge to overcome... but the mode is limited, and too fiddly to really be enjoyable. In fact, that's this game all over, really. Levels are short, stop-start affairs (because they rehash the original trilogy, which had gotten a full game the year before; they've only added in Kingdom of the Crystal Skull but they had to follow the pattern established, so it's all broken up into bits) and the hub worlds are compressed and difficult to get your bearing in. It's all perfectly fine, but nothing more. If this is the only LEGO game you've played, then you have chosen poorly. Not Important (a boost for at least remembering the point of LEGO and trying to let you build with it).

LEGO Jurassic World is another which I played on PS4, but got to see the PS3 version elsewhere, so same again; increase the loading times, decrease the framerate. It's also one of the first LEGO games I played where it was developed by the "B Team" from Traveller's Tales (to meet demand, the summer LEGO game is usually pushed out whilst the core developers work on the Christmas release, and that year it was LEGO Dimensions). Unfortunately, this difference in development team really shows with Jurassic World. More than half the voice clips are samples ripped from the original films, and there are very few new gameplay ideas on display. It does the job as a cute, playable take on the franchise, but doesn't make any extra effort or innovation and therefore feels like a cash-in. This is the first where I'd agree with @Jaz007 in calling it "very stale" and so yeah, I'm gonna have to categorise it as Pointless ("Don't you mean extinct?"). Huge fans of dinosaurs can boost that if they like.

Only played The LEGO Movie Videogame on PS Vita and it's a totally different game, so will have to look into that one properly tomorrow. Have never played LEGO Lord of the Rings or LEGO Marvel's Avengers, either, so they join the research pile for now.

Gonna break this into two posts, just in case I overload something.

Edited on by RogerRoger

PSN ID: GDS_2421
Making It So Since 1987

RogerRoger

LEGO Marvel Super-Heroes is a game I never thought I'd play or like, because I'm not really a fan of the Marvel property, but my friend is and so we spent a long weekend playing the PS3 version. I've gotta admit, as somebody who doesn't know his Spider-Men from his Ant Men, it's a really good game. The hub is vast but accessible and the original script, just like LEGO Batman 2, is imaginative and genuinely funny. It does start to suffer from that aforementioned "ability overload" (where you have to stop and search through your party for the one character that can do the one specific thing you need; gone are the simple days of "this guy jumps high, this guy uses the Force and this guy is small, so can fit through vents... and that's pretty much it, go nuts") because they're desperate to represent every superhero's powers, but it never felt too intrusive. Whilst I'm certain it'd be a smoother experience on PS4, the PS3 version held up really well and was hugely enjoyable. The only thing is, unless you're a die-hard Marvel fan who refuses to play anything but Marvel games, you can pretty much replicate the gameplay experience in several other LEGO contemporaries. For all my praise, therefore, there's little to call this game unique beyond the franchise itself, so I'd call it Existing.

LEGO Pirates of the Caribbean and LEGO Rock Band? Skip!

LEGO Star Wars: The Complete Saga is the game which started it all... well, at least half of it is. Combining the original LEGO Star Wars (which translated the prequel trilogy into brick form) and the sequel, LEGO Star Wars II: The Original Trilogy, it adds in a few new bonus features and restores levels that were cut for time / budget, like Anakin Skywalker's assault on the Droid Control Ship from Episode I and the Coruscant speeder chase from Episode II. It also returns to the prequel vehicle levels and tweaks them with new controls and better layouts. The gameplay is the purest form of LEGO platforming; none of it is confusing or sprawling, and whilst there's replay value in all the usual forms (Free Play, Red Bricks, Minikits, etc.) everything is still quite slow-paced, even moreso by today's standards. So being honest? This is a remastered re-release. It's a good one, with some thought and care put into it, but it's still the second or third chance folks had to play it. Feel free to disagree, but I'd call it Existing.

LEGO Star Wars: The Force Awakens reeks of trying to make a quick buck. Released after only one new Star Wars film, and therefore stretching sequences out to their absolute limit to justify deserving a twenty-minute level, it's a bit of a slog. In your downtime, you'll fly between large and confusing hub worlds to roam around, taking note of things you can't do yet because you haven't unlocked the right character with the right ability. The DLC was pretty good, adapting canon comic books to give the core story more context, but some of it falls way beyond fan service and plummets into obscurity (or doesn't explain itself well enough to make sense to casual players). The new film simply wasn't established enough to make it iconic, and so LEGO didn't have much to work with. The one new gameplay idea is essentially a "Baby's First Gears of War" cover-based shooting gallery mechanic which does little to advance the imagination LEGO could potentially offer. At least they got Harrison Ford in a recording booth to say "Wookiee Cookies", even if a lot of the other dialogue is lazily ripped from the film. I'm heading towards calling this one Pointless, I'm sorry to say.

Save the best 'til last, though.

LEGO Star Wars III: The Clone Wars isn't just an excellent LEGO game, it's an excellent game, period. Adapting the first two seasons of the animated show, the episodic structure provides truckloads of variety which the game takes full advantage of. Gameplay is evolved in multiple key ways, all of which work brilliantly. There are sprawling tactical land battles reminiscent of Command & Conquer, with hundreds of LEGO figures in play at once to encourage strategic thinking. Space combat levels invariably have you landing on capital ships, mixing things up with some excellent pacing and seamless transitions. Even the traditional on-foot platforming levels occasionally ask you to not only switch characters, but to switch to characters in entirely different locations, giving you picture-in-picture monitoring to achieve your objectives simultaneously. Unlike later LEGO games, none of this is confusing; everything was built upon to a point where it was impressive and accessible, but not overwhelming. That's thanks to a fluid progression system via Gold Bricks, meaning you can't unlock new areas of the (absolutely stunning) hub world until you've completed enough of the story, ensuring that whatever's beyond the door will make sense when you see it. Whilst this was also one of the last "mute" LEGO games, the entire voice cast of The Clone Wars records original grunts, sighs and laughs for their characters, and the cartoonish nature of the source material makes that traditional LEGO humour a perfect fit.

I'm forever frustrated that the gameplay advances demonstrated in LEGO Star Wars III were all-but-abandoned in future releases, and that LEGO has settled into repetitive mediocrity for its licenced titles (one or two exceptions notwithstanding). Now, I'm gonna personally rank LEGO Star Wars III as Very Important because of what it could've represented and what it should've done for the reputation of LEGO games. If anybody feels like that isn't working to the criteria, then I'll lower that down to Important.

Phew!

Edited on by RogerRoger

PSN ID: GDS_2421
Making It So Since 1987

RogerRoger

So, all that means my initial hot take on this new list is as follows...

***

Just Dance 2015
Just Dance 2016
Just Dance 2017
Just Dance 2018
Kung Fu Rider
🎮 L.A. Noire - Important
Lair
Last Rebellion
Legendary
Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole
The Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel - Very Important
The Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel 2 - Very Important
The Legend of Spyro: Dawn of the Dragon
Legends of War: Patton
Lego Batman: The Videogame
🎮 Lego Batman 2: DC Super Heroes - Important
🎮 Lego Batman 3: Beyond Gotham - Not Important
LEGO Dimensions Starter Pack
Lego Harry Potter: Years 1–4
Lego Harry Potter: Years 5-7
Lego Indiana Jones: The Original Adventures
🎮 Lego Indiana Jones 2: The Adventure Continues - Not Important
🎮 LEGO Jurassic World - Pointless
The LEGO Movie Videogame
LEGO Lord Of The Rings
LEGO Marvel's Avengers
🎮 Lego Marvel Super Heroes - Existing
Lego Pirates of the Caribbean: The Video Game
Lego Rock Band
🎮 Lego Star Wars: The Complete Saga - Existing
🎮 Lego Star Wars: The Force Awakens - Pointless
🎮 Lego Star Wars III: The Clone Wars - Very Important

***

Thanks to @TowaHerschel7 for your input on the Legend of Heroes games. Despite having never played them myself, I'll support your rankings.

PSN ID: GDS_2421
Making It So Since 1987

Foxy-Goddess-Scotchy

I've played Lego Batman one... The PS2 version though and it's been forever so I'm quite foggy on the details

All the levels are new (not inspired by a film's events basically) with there being a hero campaign and a villain campaign (You have to play the hero version first to get the villain version... The villain levels I think being how the hero version of the level's events are set up?)

It uses the mime set up of the original lego star wars games and such though with no voice acting.

I'd say an existing I guess? sorry really don't remember it all that much probably best if you do some additional research @RogerRoger

You don't need to save the world to find meaning in life. Sometimes all you need is something simple, like someone to take care of - Aigis, Persona 3

"No cost too great. No mind to think. No will to break. No voice to cry suffering" - Hollow Knight

Th3solution

@RogerRoger Wonderful contribution there, my friend! Thank you so much! That’s exactly what we needed and your thoughts seem on target and well supported. Having never played more than a couple minutes of a LEGO game in a demo or at a friends place, I am inclined to trust your well thought-out expertise here.

@Jaz007 @themcnoisy @TowaHerschel7 @Frigate
As for myself, the only game on our list so far that I’ve played is the Legends of Cold Steel I, and I’ve only played the first 10 or so hours and probably shouldn’t even give myself a 🎮 credit on it per our criteria. With the small amount I’ve played, coupled with the fact that the game clearly spawned the sequel and a soon to be released third game on current gen consoles, I can get behind the ‘very important’ classification. Additionally, I think Trails is a pretty large franchise in Japan, but I’m not sure if we are supposed to really try to take that into consideration as it does open up a whole other can of worms to try to account to global influence since some games that Westerners would call ‘not important’ or ‘pointless’ would be quite important in the East. I think it best to keep within our own cultural perspective unless there is clear objective evidence to support a game’s influence (such as large sales) in Asia.
Nevertheless, Japanese success notwithstanding, ToCS is an impressive contribution and perhaps a little under-appreciated in the West when compared to what I would consider its counterpart— the Persona games. Despite following a lot of JRPG conventions and having a mixture of turn-based combat dungeon crawling along with social simulation relationship building like Persona, it has its own nuance and strong story telling. It really is quite an accomplishment. My only reservation would be that it didn’t seem to influence the gaming culture to the extent of Persona 3 or 4, even if the overall quality is on par. Alas, the high technical achievement, art, and personal reception is profound enough to stick with ‘very important’ imo.

Edited on by Th3solution

The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

mookysam

The first LEGO Batman (autocorrected as Barman) is really good fun. I loved the locations, huge cast of characters and humour. Gameplay wise it's LEGO, so not a whole lot to say on that front; basically you bash everything in sight. One boss battle I remember being a pain in the bum is Mr. Freeze. Certainly an existing.

mookysam

PSN: mookysam

themcnoisy

LEGO Dimensions Starter Pack - Existing.

I really dislike dimensions though. I have the portal and the Simpson mini figures. The levels don't make any sense, graphically poor and it's a haphazard game in every sense.

Lego Marvel Super Heroes - Very Important

Probably the last best game from Telltale before it became regurgitated beyond sense. Brought in an open world hub and loads of characters. This was pre 'paying for extra characters' and you could unlock everything in game.

@RogerRoger I agree with these scores for sure

🎮 Lego Indiana Jones 2: The Adventure Continues - Not Important
🎮 LEGO Jurassic World - Pointless
🎮 Lego Star Wars: The Force Awakens - Pointless

I would bump this one up
🎮 Lego Star Wars: The Complete Saga - Important

However I never played this version and am primarily basing my score on the original games. Which set the whole thing off. Existing is probably more apt.

Forum Best Game of All Time Awards

Multiplat 2018: Horizon Zero Dawn
Nintendo 2017: Super Mario Bros 3
Playstation 2016: Uncharted 2
Multiplat 2015: Final Fantasy 7

PSN: mc_noisy

RogerRoger

@Foxy-Goddess-Scotchy @mookysam Every little helps, thank you both! I think I may have played a demo of it at some point, actually, maybe on PS2. It's an early one so would've definitely just been "punch things made of LEGO and run around" in terms of gameplay; I think it was LEGO Batman 2 that started to get really nuts with the different ability-based bat-suits, although they may have started out in the first game (I seem to recall a Robin with magnetic feet who could walk up walls).

Since you've both indicated Existing then that's probably where I'll end up. I might do a bit of research just to confirm that memory of the demo.

@Th3solution Happy to help! I'm just sorry that I haven't played more, but given the sheer volume of LEGO games I've always felt it best to spread them out across different systems when there's potential of a pile-up (for example, when The LEGO Movie came out, I'd just finished playing a previous LEGO game on console, so the smaller PS Vita version was the natural fit).

They're great when you play one every year / eighteen months, and it obviously helps if you like the source material; I think a lot of people's LEGO fatigue comes from trying to play them all. There's no way in heck I could do that (I did go through a phase of getting the main console version AND the handheld version of each new release, but by the time I was halfway through the latter I was invariably kinda bored, with the exception of LEGO Star Wars III: The Clone Wars on PSP). If you're looking for something simple and funny, though, and you like one of the franchises represented, you can't go wrong for a tenner.

@themcnoisy Thanks for balancing out LEGO Marvel Super-Heroes with such strong support. As I said, it really is a heck of a lot of fun and you're right, probably the last hurrah of the traditional "all in the box" approach. I'll likely stick with my ranking of Existing if you're gonna vote it so high, so it'll likely settle into a well-earned Important classification.

If you wanna bump up LEGO Star Wars: The Complete Saga, go right ahead. The legacy of the previous two games is pretty huge and as I said, it's a well-handled remaster with a lot of extra care and attention which made it a worthwhile purchase even if, like me, you had both of the original PS2 games on your shelf already. Given that it was such an early PS3 game as well (no trophies, alas) it might've been a lot of people's first exposure to a LEGO game. I'm happy wherever it ends up between the two rankings.

Otherwise, thanks for agreeing with my analysis! And yeah, Dimensions never grabbed me. There's a lot about it I should love (Batman! Sonic! Doctor Who!) but the fact I've never gotten around to it speaks volumes. Glad to hear I wasn't missing out on much.

Totally got the little Sonic minifigure, though. He's adorable!

PSN ID: GDS_2421
Making It So Since 1987

themcnoisy

I had forgotten about Lego Avengers. Its one of the weaker efforts. It was also the last Lego game I played with my youngest Son.

Not Important imo. Underwhelming.


Legendary - run of the mill fps with bad presentation and on the PS3 bad performance. I had this on the xbox and found it fun for a night. I would rate it as not important.

Kung Fu Rider - a launch ps3 move game which has a brilliant original idea. You ride down streets on a chair, very original. However it's one of the most unresponsive games using move and gets boring very quickly. This has to go in the pointless category and one of the main candidates for worst game on ps3.

Forum Best Game of All Time Awards

Multiplat 2018: Horizon Zero Dawn
Nintendo 2017: Super Mario Bros 3
Playstation 2016: Uncharted 2
Multiplat 2015: Final Fantasy 7

PSN: mc_noisy

Gremio108

@Th3solution Just catching up on an extended weekend's worth of threads. There are lots of good debates across the message boards, a lot of great points made. But when taken out of context, "Hannah Montana isn’t splitting the atom" is one of my personal favourite Push Square quotes of all time.

Good job, Parappa. You can go on to the next stage now.

PSN: Hallodandy

Th3solution

@Gremio108 Lol, yeah, well... the best quotes are always unintentional. 😂
It does sound pretty funny when you take it out of context.

The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

KALofKRYPTON

@Th3solution @Gremio108 @themcnoisy @RogerRoger @Foxy-Goddess-Scotchy
Right then Lair!

Factor 5’s much maligned dragon ‘em up and for me, one the most lazily reviewed games I ever had the pleasure of playing.

First things first - this is a Factor 5 game and I think, was in immediate development after the not-that-great Rebel Strike on the GameCube and using what appeared to be the same engine.

Following the stunning trailers for the game, Lair was met with a decidedly hostile reception from the majority of reviewers. While I would say that the same basic design principles carried over from the Rogue Squadron games and the engine struggling to perform are open for legitimate criticism - the ire of most reviewers was pointed at the mandatory Sixaxis motion controls. The knock on effect of this was detrimental to the game and, as I mentioned earlier seemed wholly down to lazy reviewers.

As with the Rogue games, Lair is a fairly straightforward proposition - you ride dragons and shoot and maul air and ground targets as the story (I'll speak more about that later) progresses. All well and good really, apart from the motion controls for some.
The DualShock 3 set up used the majority of the face and shoulder buttons in game, but flight direction was handled by tilting the controller as you would a flight stick. Criticism of this generally centered on a lack of precision and reviewers feeling frustrated that they weren't very good at it - blaming the set up and the game for their lack of skill.
It wasn't an easy pick up and play for sure, but it always struck me as being in control of an animal, like riding a horse (which admittedly, I've only done a couple of times). When you're riding a horse, you can't stop immediately, you can't spin on a sixpence at full speed and take off in another direction. You convey your wishes to the animal through your body movement and the reins. So with Lair, the movement of your dragon felt like being in control of a living thing; not the stick precision of piloting an X-Wing in the vacuum of space, but the partnership of guiding a giant beast through the air. And when that gelled, it was sublime.

It wasn't perfect however. Some of the motion control choices were mildly annoying; a mid-air-melee-mini-game that required you to shunt an opposing dragon with a quick slam of the pad left or right just wasn't fun and the yank up for a 180 turn wasn't the best either. But none of this was the broken mess reviewers made it out to be.
In fact, just the flying alone made it worth the purchase. A later patch for the game enabled the option for analogue control, which was unfortunately too late to help things commercially. It was already possible before the update to enable analogue control through an exploit however, but it really didn't add anything to the game, and possibly exposed how weak a proposition it was as it really did just become Rogue Squadron Dragons.

The engine struggled; and at times it felt rather ‘last gen’, with regular frame drops and the basic gameplay tropes.
At times Lair looked fantastic. Explosions and ground units weren't all that, but the player dragon, the enemy dragons and vistas were rather enthralling.

The story for Lair was actually rather good. It had a unique fantasy setting and there was politics, religion, friendships and betrayals. A shame then that the well acted and conceived narrative was intertwined with what amounted to a rather sloppy mission structure that you would be very familiar with having played any of the Rogue Squadron (or similar) games.

Accompanying the satisfying narrative was another criminally overlooked PS3 score. John Debney’s score for Lair is an equally satisfying, if unsurprising fantasy romp. Initially, I had written more on the power and suitability of the music in Lair, but it had a more important role to play for the future of PlayStation that merits a better than ‘Existing’ rating…

… and that is: Remote Play! Yep, Lair was the first game that properly ran Remote Play. From the PS3 to the PSP no less - and it worked, really well.
It was mostly a curiosity for me, a show off piece for my many RROD suffering 360 mates - and it lead me to the aforementioned analogue control exploit (the PSP was assigned to controller 2 and allowed for analogue flight control, which worked the same with just connecting a second DualShock and playing with that).

Lair proved that Remote Play, the basic principle and functionality was viable. That screen mirroring wasn't just the playground of the ‘PC Master Race’, that combining the PSP and later the Vita to the PS3 could have incredible results and provide worthwhile experiences (apart from that MvC Ultimate Controller thing… 😂).

From Vitas, Xperias, PSTVs, work laptops and now even iOS *spits like the old woman in Allo, Allo - Remote Play started with Lair - test bed for what has become a banner feature for the PlayStation platform. ‘IMPORTANT’.

Edited on by KALofKRYPTON

PSN: KALofKRYPTON (so you can see how often I don't play anything!)

Twitter: @KALofKRYPTON (at your own risk, I don't care if you're offended)

"Fate: Protects fools, little children, and ships named Enterprise." - Cmdr William T. Riker

Th3solution

@KALofKRYPTON Wow. Thanks for that! I would have never given Lair much credit, so it’s nice to see someone who really played it with an open mind extol it’s virtues. Right on!

The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

Frigate

Just Dance 2015 Ubisoft Paris Not Important
Just Dance 2016 Ubisoft Paris Not Important
Just Dance 2017 Ubisoft Paris Not Important
Just Dance 2018 Ubisoft Paris Not Important
Kung Fu Rider SCE Studios Japan Existing
🎮L.A. Noire Team Bondi Important
Lair Factor 5 Existing
Last Rebellion Hit Maker Existing
Legendary Spark Unlimited Existing
Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole Krome Studios Pointless
The Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel Nihon Falcom Corp Important
The Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel 2 Nihon Falcom Corp Important
The Legend of Spyro: Dawn of the Dragon Étranges Libellules Existing
Legends of War: Patton Enigma Pointless
Lego Batman: The Videogame Traveller's Tales Important
Lego Batman 2: DC Super Heroes Traveller's Tales Existing
Lego Batman 3: Beyond Gotham Traveller's Tales Existing
LEGO Dimensions Starter Pack Traveller's Tales Existing
Lego Harry Potter: Years 1–4 Traveller's Tales Existing
Lego Harry Potter: Years 5-7 Traveller's Tales Existing
Lego Indiana Jones: The Original Adventures Traveller's Tales Existing
Lego Indiana Jones 2: The Adventure Continues Traveller's Tales Not Important
LEGO Jurassic World Traveller's Tales Not Important
The LEGO Movie Videogame Traveller's Tales Existing
LEGO Lord Of The Rings Traveller's Tales Existing
LEGO Marvel's Avengers Traveller's Tales Existing
Lego Marvel Super Heroes Traveller's Tales Not Important
Lego Pirates of the Caribbean: The Video Game Traveller's Tales Existing
Lego Rock Band Harmonix / Traveller's Tales Pointless
Lego Star Wars: The Complete Saga Traveller's Tales Important
Lego Star Wars: The Force Awakens Traveller's Tales Existing
Lego Star Wars III: The Clone Wars Traveller's Tales Not Important

I'm done here. Locked.

Frigate

Jaz007

I’ve also played Lair and feel like labeling it important. The reviewers were just closed minded and it felt like it controlled like it should. It was so unique to use the motion controls and showed the possibilities it had. I had no problem with it whatsoever. Beyond flying, there was a shake it up and down to rip turrets out and it gave me a headache. Other than that motion controls were great. The graphics were also pretty good and that was the best reviewed part do the game. It has a lot of technical achievement and missed future opportunity with it. I don’t like arcade plane games much, but this brought something new to the table. Story was an okay, but forgettable affair. I also tried out the analog stick cottons. They felt terrible and ruined the game and it’s spirit.

Backkoggery ID: Jaz007

RogerRoger

@KALofKRYPTON I'm sold. Thanks for your thoughts, nicely backed up by Captain @Jaz007 there so yeah, I'll happily add another "Important" ranking to the Lair pile.

PSN ID: GDS_2421
Making It So Since 1987

KALofKRYPTON

@Th3solution @Jaz007 @RogerRoger
No worries 🤘🏽

PSN: KALofKRYPTON (so you can see how often I don't play anything!)

Twitter: @KALofKRYPTON (at your own risk, I don't care if you're offended)

"Fate: Protects fools, little children, and ships named Enterprise." - Cmdr William T. Riker

RogerRoger

I'm afraid the rest of my week looks rather busy, so I've done some rapid-fire research on the remaining games I've yet to rank, to provide an early locked list.

Whilst I'd normally give blind support to any comrade when stuck like this, and there is a list of rankings above from @Frigate which I could use, our difference of opinion on some of the LEGO games previously mentioned seems rather vast, so I'm not quite sure we'd be on the same page enough for me to do that, alas. Hurrah for democracy and balance, I guess!

So, with brief elaboration beneath it, here's my final list for this week.

***

Just Dance 2015 - Existing
Just Dance 2016 - Not Important
Just Dance 2017 - Not Important
Just Dance 2018 - Not Important
Kung Fu Rider - Pointless
🎮 L.A. Noire - Important
Lair - Important
Last Rebellion - Pointless
Legendary - Not Important
Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole - Not Important
The Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel - Very Important
The Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel 2 - Very Important
The Legend of Spyro: Dawn of the Dragon - Not Important
Legends of War: Patton - Existing
Lego Batman: The Videogame - Existing
🎮 Lego Batman 2: DC Super Heroes - Important
🎮 Lego Batman 3: Beyond Gotham - Not Important
LEGO Dimensions Starter Pack - Existing
Lego Harry Potter: Years 1–4 - Existing
Lego Harry Potter: Years 5-7 - Existing
Lego Indiana Jones: The Original Adventures - Existing
🎮 Lego Indiana Jones 2: The Adventure Continues - Not Important
🎮 LEGO Jurassic World - Pointless
The LEGO Movie Videogame - Not Important
LEGO Lord Of The Rings - Pointless
LEGO Marvel's Avengers - Not Important
🎮 Lego Marvel Super Heroes - Existing
Lego Pirates of the Caribbean: The Video Game - Not Important
Lego Rock Band - Not Important
🎮 Lego Star Wars: The Complete Saga - Existing
🎮 Lego Star Wars: The Force Awakens - Pointless
🎮 Lego Star Wars III: The Clone Wars - Very Important

***

A quick scan of the Just Dance games reveals that 2015 was seen by some as a "reinvigoration" of the flagging franchise, whereas 2016 was not (although it won a Kid's Choice Award, showing its target audience a bit too blatantly there; did the same in 2017, too). Apparently, 2017 was a slight improvement, but by this stage I'm not seeing any innovation or real achievement to reflect that in a higher ranking, despite its huge popularity with kids. Also, wow, the PS3 got Just Dance 2018, eh? That says something about that aforementioned popularity, to still be releasing so late on the last generation.

Last Rebellion made me chuckle when I looked it up, because President of NIS America Haru Akenaga has gone on record saying that he felt "really sorry for our customers because we released that title" and that... well, that says it all, really.

By all accounts, the Owl game (hey, I said I was rushing) was a family-friendly film tie-in that didn't offend anybody, even if it didn't amaze them either. I think "Not Important" is fair.

The Legend of Spyro: Dawn of the Dragon was an unfortunate fall from grace for our purple pal, especially considering it was rounding out a reboot trilogy that didn't start on PS3 and hadn't lit the world on fire like the developers had hoped. If anybody was still playing by this point, they were treated to a supremely average affair by all accounts. Spyro deserves better, and got better a generation later with his recent remasters. Move along; nothing to see here.

I could only find two professional reviews for Legends of War: Patton but something one of them said stuck in my head; specifically, that the strategy genre wasn't hugely well-represented on PS3. Combining those two firm-but-fair reviews with some YouTube footage, I'm probably being a tad generous with an "Existing" ranking but hey, it's where my gut has landed.

Turns out praise for LEGO Harry Potter (both games) was pretty solid, with only a few passing comments about the lack of LEGO gameplay innovation countered by others saying that it was a good evolution of the template. So there we go.

LEGO Indiana Jones: The Original Adventures was new enough in the LEGO cycle for folks not to be bored yet, and the minor tweaks in the gameplay mechanics worked well in the context of all that fortune and glory... however, I still get the feeling that a lot of reviews are written by Indy fans (because hey, who isn't a fan?!) and can sense that they're heaping praise on because they like the source material more than the game itself. It's taking a lot of self-control not to rank it higher!

I'm giving a lower rank to The LEGO Movie Videogame because whilst the PS3 version was quite highly rated, almost everybody acknowledges that the game is both "more of the same" LEGO gameplay and quite unstable from a technical perspective, riddled with bugs and glitches. I can only imagine these would be more prevalent on the older console.

LEGO Lord of the Rings was the first LEGO game to start lazily ripping dialogue straight from the source material. It was also the first to come with DLC expansions. The rot begins.

All the reviews for LEGO Pirates of the Caribbean complain that it doesn't advance the LEGO series "as the Clone Wars game did a few months back" (nudge nudge). Scores across the board were actually pretty low. I watched a little bit of gameplay and yeah, I think they're right.

LEGO Rock Band seems like a total disaster to me, merging Rock Band with customisable LEGO band members and instruments. Many noted at the time that the musical selection included in the game is at odds with the kid-friendly presentation, but it included a Super Easy Mode to help corrupt young minds even earlier than the main Rock Band games would (and yes, I can see that bias flare you just sent up; it's late and I'm tired). Long story short? Yet another average LEGO experience.

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And that's all I got, so it just remains for me to wish the rest of the team luck in getting these locked down before I'm back, and to remind you all that if you don't elevate LEGO Star Wars III: The Clone Wars to ultimate supremacy, I'll be mildly vexed for, like, a good thirty seconds.

PSN ID: GDS_2421
Making It So Since 1987

Frigate

@RogerRoger My opinions of the Lego games are based off years of watching my wife play pretty much every Lego game ever made and her varying opinions at the time which are largely personal opinion.

I'd be inclined to push forward your ( mostly impartial ) view.

Frigate

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